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Fidelity of yellowfin tuna to seamount and island foraging grounds in the central South Atlantic Ocean

first_imgThe yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is a widely distributed, migratory species that supports valuable commercial fisheries throughout their range. Management of migratory species requires knowledge of movement, mixing and key life history parameters such as growth rate, natural and fisheries mortality. Current management is based on the assumptions that the species is highly migratory and populations are well mixed, but these assumptions have been questioned by recent studies. Since November 2015, yellowfin tuna have been tagged with conventional, archival and pop-up satellite tags (PSAT) in the South Atlantic Ocean around St Helena, with the goal of better understanding their movement patterns and ecology in this region. Conventional tags were attached to 4049 yellowfin tuna (size range 24–158 cm fork length, FL), PSAT tags were deployed on 15 yellowfin in inshore St Helena waters (size range 95–138 cm FL) and 7 yellowfin (size range 125–140 cm FL) at Cardno Seamount, and archival tags were deployed on 48 yellowfin tuna in inshore St Helena waters (size range 69–111 cm FL). Most yellowfin tuna remained within 70 km of their release location, suggesting a degree of retention to the region. Although displacement of yellowfin was generally low, the furthest distance travelled between release and recapture location was 2755 km, with other tuna also displaying large-scale movements. Tagging revealed connections between inshore regions and seamounts, as well as links between St Helena waters and key fishing regions and putative spawning grounds in the Gulf of Guinea.last_img read more

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Glenfarne Group completes acquisition of Magnolia LNG project

first_imgMagnolia LNG is an 8mtpa LNG export terminal development project located on the Industrial Canal near Lake Charles in Southwest Louisiana Glenfarne Group completes acquisition of Magnolia LNG project. (Credit: Pixabay/Gerd Altmann) US-based energy and infrastructure development and management firm, Glenfarne Group has acquired Magnolia LNG through Glenfarne’s newly formed subsidiary Magnolia LNG.Magnolia LNG is an eight million tonnes per annum (mtpa) LNG export terminal development project in Louisiana, US that has already secured Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval.Situated on the Industrial Canal near Lake Charles in Southwest Louisiana, the 115-acre project has a long-term Lease Option Agreement in place with the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District.It also has permission to receive natural gas from the existing Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline (KMLP) and will pretreat, liquefy and store the LNG onsite for export and domestic purpose.KMLP is interconnected with several pipeline systems, including the ANR, Transco, Columbia Gulf, TETCO, Texas Gas, and Pine Prairie pipelines to procure gas from the US Gulf Coast states.The acquisition increases Glenfarne’s LNG export capacity to about 12 mtpaUnder the transaction, Glenfarne has also acquired Magnolia LNG’s patented optimised single mixed refrigerant (OSMR) liquefaction technology.The technology is a low-cost, highly efficient process which is configured to generate lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to other conventional LNG processes.Glenfarne founder and managing partner Brendan Duval said: “Magnolia LNG is a well-known and high-quality project to which Glenfarne brings its funding, marketing, development and construction expertise to take it to Final Investment Decision, and then construct and operate the asset.“We believe in the essential role that natural gas plays in the transition to a lower carbon world. The facility will provide clean, low-cost and reliable energy globally, and we are proud to support this critical infrastructure project.”The firm said that the acquisition increases Glenfarne’s LNG export capacity to about 12 mtpa, of which 4mtpa will come from Texas LNG Brownsville, which is a late-stage LNG export development project in Brownsville, Texas.last_img read more

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Sultan’s honorary doctorate upheld despite objections

first_imgInternational law also prohibits the criminalisation of consensual relations betwen adults in private, which violates the rights to privacy, quality and freedom from arbitrary arrest and detention.The news of the University’s refusal to reconsider the honour in response to questions from PinkNews prompted swift reaction from students.An emergency motion was put to OUSU Council on Wednesday, proposed by Dan Templeton, LGBTQ Officer for the student union, mandating the LGBTQ Campaign to write a letter to the relevant authorities, explaining the situation for LGBTQ people in Brunei, and asking the University to clarify the reasons for its decision and to strip the Sultan of his honorary degree.The motion also mandates the campaign to ask the University to reveal any funding it has received from the Sultan of Brunei. It passed quickly and by unanimous decision.Dan Templeton told Cherwell, “The current lack of action by the University is highly disappointing and shows a serious lack of regard for LGBTQ students in Oxford. The fact that OUSU passed a unanimous motion to condemn the Sultan of Brunei’s honorary degree and call for its revocation demonstrates the anger felt by Oxford students. “We hope that Oxford University will reconsider its position regarding the Sultan’s degree and look forward to working with the student unions in King’s College London and Aberdeen to achieve the same; only then can these institutions claim that they support LGBTQ rights.”The Sultan of Brunei, Hassanal Bolkiah, became Sultan in 1967, at the age of 21.His 1,800-room palace, the Istana Nurul Iman, is the largest private residence in the world, and his family’s fortune is estimated to be £7.75 billion.Since Brunei gained independence from the UK in 1984, the Sultan has been awarded an honorary knighthood by the Queen in 1992 and honorary degrees from other universities, including the University of Aberdeen and King’s College London, where the Sultan holds an Honorary Law Doctorate awarded to him in 2011.All of these institutions have so far refused to reconsider their initial decision to uphold the honorary degrees. Students have reacted with outrage to news that the University has refused to rescind the Sultan of Brunei’s Honorary Doctorate in Law after he revised the country’s laws earlier this year to make same-sex sexual activity punishable by stoning to death.To be publicly LGBTQ in Brunei was previously punishable by a 10-year prison sentence, but following a number of changes this year, the death penalty has been introduced. Any person who declares him or herself to be a non-Muslim is liable to face the same penalty.The Sultan, however, currently holds an Honorary Doctorate from the University, and sponsors a fellowship at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (OCIS).Both the University and OCIS have refused to review this situation in the light of this news. A University spokesman told Cherwell, “At present, the University will not be rescinding the Sultan of Brunei’s 1993 Honorary Degree of Civil Law by Diploma. We have no further comment at this time.”A spokesman for OCIS said, “The fellowship was endowed a number of years ago and all due procedure followed at that time. We do not think it would be appropriate to revisit the matter, or make any further comment.”OCIS has accepted donations from a range of further controversial figures. Another fellowship is sponsored by Sultan bin Abdulaziz, former Sultan of Saudi Arabia, whose £2 million donation to the Ashmolean Museum in 2005 prompted criticism in national news.The Sultan of Brunei was condemned by the United Nations when the laws were first passed on April of this year.Speaking to LGBT news site PinkNews at the time, a spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights remarked, “Application of the death penalty for such a broad range of offenses contravenes international law.”He added, “Under international law, stoning people to death constitutes torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and is thus clearly prohibited.”last_img read more

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Halloween in Bayonne Photos by Rory Pasquariello

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Apprenticeship consultation

first_imgImprove, the sector skills council for food and drink, has started consultation with employers on plans for a new framework for apprenticeship programmes.”This will be a crucial reform,” said Jack Matthews, Improve’s chief executive, who added that completed apprenticeships in food and drink manufacturing subjects at Level 2 have more than doubled in the last two years from 332 to 668.But the numbers remain disappointingly small compared to other industries, where people complete apprenticeships in their thousands every year.At present, apprenticeships are available only in bakery, general food and drink manufacturing, and meat and poultry processing. The new proposals are to introduce one flexible framework, which can be adapted to meet the specific needs of any of the 10 sub-sectors within food and drink manufacturing, from dairy to brewing.Development work on the new apprenticeship framework will continue until September. .last_img read more

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Granting a golden opportunity?

first_imgThere are many times when a business may need money and advice and it’s estimated there are around £5 billion-worth of support grants and programmes you could tap into.However, each programme will have its own strict terms and conditions that apply to all applicants. These govern, for example, the use of the monies, what happens if the business stops trading and, if repayments are due, when they are to be paid. Expect demands for immediate repayment if the rules aren’t followed and you need to know that government grants are normally for projects that are at planning stage only.You may only get part of the money you need, as the organisation behind the assistance expects you to be able to match its commitment with your own money. The proportion you get will vary according to the funding programme.SourcesGrants and assistance programmes are made available by the government through the various departments, the European Union, various Regional Development Agencies throughout the UK, local authorities, local development agencies, Business Links, Chambers of Commerce and County Enterprise Boards. Some funding is also distributed through colleges and the Learning and Skills Council.There are 13 different types of grant and help available, inclu-ding cash, repayable grants, consultancy, subsidies, technology help and advice and information. The grants are channelled in various ways: some encourage investment in innovation, research and development and some are there to specifically help small businesses.Others help with training and skills through the Learning and Skills Council as well as the Business Links. If you want to employ New Deal candidates or training of young people, you may be able to get help from Jobcentre Plus.Age and inexperience needn’t be a barrier. Indeed, assistance and funds are available from The Prince’s Trust to those who may be unemployed, or employed in a part-time or low-paid job, are aged 18-30 and have a business idea.Grants are meant to stimulate business activity and this is the reason why a business based in an ’assisted area’ may be able to get extra grants if they can help with regional development, urban regeneration or an improvement in prospects for local employment.Find the grantsYou can find out much of the information online for nothing. However, some information is chargeable.Through the Business Links website, you can search through the Grants and Support Directory for nothing. There are several thousand national and local programmes available, at all levels, depending on what you want, where you are and so on.But there are also private sector agencies that provide information on available grants and can give assistance in applying for them. However, it is worthwhile searching online and comparing a few different agencies. Many of them charge a fee or subscription, but remember, none of them can guarantee success in getting funding for you.To find them, just go online and search for “support and grants”.The application processAssuming you have gone through the process of finding the grant you want to apply for, and making sure you qualify, you will want to make your proposal. But before you do, it might be worth making personal contact with the provider – you might pick up some tips. Remembering that you may have to put some of your own money up, you need to be able to show the specific purpose for the grant. Don’t start work before you’ve been given the green light on funding, as you’ll exclude yourself if you do. Also, heed any deadlines.If you need any advice when preparing your proposal, consider speaking to an adviser at a Business Link.You will have to provide a detailed description of the reason for the application, give an explanation of the benefits of the project, detail the plan and provide full financial data, provide details of your own experience and that of your (senior) colleagues, complete the application form and submit a business plan. The decision is not always quick and could take many months.Dealing with rejectionMany fail with their application the first time around. Asking the organisation concerned why you’ve been rejected will help you when you re-apply.Typically, the reasons why applications are turned down include:? the failure to prove the need for the money? providing information that is out of date? a failure to show that own funds are available? submitting a plan that is poorly written and produced? failure to show how the research you have done will turn into concrete working business? quoting any facts that are fanciful or unbacked? failure to show the importance of receiving funding; and that the application has been made to the wrong organisation.If you cannot get a grant, you may have to resort to other forms of finance, such as the traditional bank loan. Alternatively, you may want to consider selling shares in your business.Grant eligibilitySeveral points count towards eligi- bility for grants:? Location. Through regional economic variations, social and financial needs, businesses in some parts of the UK get extra grants. Further, to attract businesses or maintain employment in the local economy, some local authorities offer their own grants.? Size of business. The size of your business, in terms of either number of employees or turnover, may have a bearing on eligibility. A lot of grants are deliberately limited to small or medium- sized enterprises.? Type of industry. It shouldn’t be a surprise to know that government and local authorities wish to encourage certain industry sectors, while they feel others do not need any assistance. Also, the European Commission places limits and checks on the help that some sectors receive.? Purpose. Grants are invariably awarded for a specific purpose, such as buying plant and equipment, improving work areas or developing export markets. Other uses will be barred. nlast_img read more

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Toward a better screen

first_img New technique can extend the flying time of microrobots RoboBees can perch to save energy Aspuru-Guzik and his team sought to replace these organometallic systems with entirely organic molecules.The team began by building libraries of more than 1.6 million candidate molecules. Then, to narrow the field, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), led by Ryan Adams, assistant professor of computer science, developed new machine-learning algorithms to predict which molecules were likely to have good outcomes, and prioritize those to be virtually tested. This effectively reduced the computational cost of the search by at least a factor of 10.“This was a natural collaboration between chemistry and machine learning,” said David Duvenaud, a postdoctoral fellow in the Adams lab and co-author of the paper. “Since the early stages of our chemical design process starts with millions of possible candidates, there’s no way for a human to evaluate and prioritize all of them. So, we used neural networks to quickly prioritize the candidates based on all the molecules already evaluated.”“Machine-learning tools are really coming of age and starting to see applications in a lot of scientific domains,” said Adams. “This collaboration was a wonderful opportunity to push the state of the art in computer science, while also developing completely new materials with many practical applications. It was incredibly rewarding to see these designs go from machine-learning predictions to devices that you can hold in your hand.”“We were able to model these molecules in a way that was really predictive,” said Rafael Gómez-Bombarelli, a postdoctoral fellow in the Aspuru-Guzik lab and first author of the paper. “We could predict the color and the brightness of the molecules from a simple quantum chemical calculation and about 12 hours of computing per molecule. We were charting chemical space and finding the frontier of what a molecule can do by running virtual experiments.”“Molecules are like athletes,” Aspuru-Guzik said. “It’s easy to find a runner, it’s easy to find a swimmer, it’s easy to find a cyclist, but it’s hard to find all three. Our molecules have to be triathletes. They have to be blue, stable, and bright.”Still, finding these super molecules takes more than computing power — it takes human intuition, said Tim Hirzel, a senior software engineer in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and co-author of the paper.To help bridge the gap between theoretical modeling and experimental practice, Hirzel and the team built a Web application for collaborators to explore the results of more than half a million quantum chemistry simulations.Every month, Gómez-Bombarelli and Jorge Aguilera-Iparraguirre, another co-author and postdoctoral fellow in the Aspuru-Guzik lab, selected the most promising molecules and used their software to create “baseball cards,” profiles containing important information about each molecule. This process identified 2,500 molecules worth a closer look. The team’s experimental collaborators at Samsung and MIT then voted on which molecules were most promising for application. The team nicknamed the voting tool “molecular Tinder” after the popular online dating app.“We facilitated the social aspect of the science in a very deliberate way,” said Hirzel.“The computer models do a lot, but the spark of genius is still coming from people,” said Gómez-Bombarelli.“The success of this effort stems from its multidisciplinary nature,” said Aspuru-Guzik. “Our collaborators at MIT and Samsung provided critical feedback regarding the requirements for the molecular structures.”“The high-throughput screening technique pioneered by the Harvard team significantly reduced the need for synthesis, experimental characterization, and optimization,” said Marc Baldo, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT and co-author of the paper. “It shows the industry how to advance OLED technology faster and more efficiently.”After this accelerated design cycle, the team was left with hundreds of molecules that perform as well as, if not better than, state-of-the-art metal-free OLEDs. Applications of this type of molecular screening also extend far beyond OLEDs.“This research is an intermediate stop in a trajectory toward more and more advanced organic molecules that could be used in flow batteries, solar cells, organic lasers, and more,” said Aspuru-Guzik. “The future of accelerated molecular design is really, really exciting.”In addition to the authors mentioned, the manuscript was co-authored by Dougal Maclaurin, Martin A. Blood-Forsythe, Hyun Sik Chae, Markus Einzinger, Dong-Gwang Ha, Tony Wu, Georgios Markopoulos, Soonok Jeon, Hosuk Kang, Hiroshi Miyazaki, Masaki Numata, Sunghan Kim, Wenliang Huang, and Seong Ik Hong.The research was supported by the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology. Harvard University researchers have designed more than 1,000 new blue-light-emitting molecules for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) that could dramatically improve displays for televisions, phones, tablets, and more.OLED screens use organic molecules that emit light when an electric current is applied. Unlike the ubiquitous liquid crystal displays (LCDs), OLED screens don’t require a backlight, meaning the display can be as thin and flexible as a sheet of plastic. Individual pixels can be switched on or off, dramatically improving the screen’s color contrast and energy consumption. OLEDs are already replacing LCDs in high-end consumer devices, but a lack of stable and efficient blue materials has made them less competitive in large displays such as televisions.The interdisciplinary team of Harvard researchers, in collaboration with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Samsung, developed a large-scale, computer-driven screening process called the Molecular Space Shuttle that incorporates theoretical and experimental chemistry, machine learning, and cheminformatics to quickly identify new OLED molecules that perform as well as, or better than, industry standards.“People once believed that this family of organic light-emitting molecules was restricted to a small region of molecular space,” said Alán Aspuru-Guzik, professor of chemistry and chemical biology, who led the research. “But by developing a sophisticated molecular builder, using state-of-the art machine learning, and drawing on the expertise of experimentalists, we discovered a large set of high-performing blue OLED materials.”The research is described in the current issue of Nature Materials.The biggest challenge in manufacturing affordable OLEDs is emission of the color blue. Like LCDs, OLEDs rely on green, red, and blue sub-pixels to produce every color on screen. But it has been difficult to find organic molecules that efficiently emit blue light. To improve efficiency, OLED producers have created organometallic molecules with expensive transition metals such as iridium to enhance the molecule through phosphorescence. This solution is expensive and it has yet to achieve a stable blue color. Relatedlast_img read more

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Priscilla Lopez Begins Performances as Pippin’s Flying Granny

first_img Pippin Related Shows Pippin features music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Roger O. Hirson and tells the story of a young prince searching for his corner of the sky. The current cast also includes Kyle Dean Massey as Pippin, Ciara Renee as Leading Player, John Rubinstein as Charles, Charlotte d’Amboise as Fastrada and Rachel Bay Jones as Catherine. Pippin received four 2013 Tony awards included Best Revival. Priscilla Lopez takes over from Annie Potts as Berthe in Pippin at Broadway’s Music Box Theatre on July 22. The Tony winner will play a limited engagement through August 27. Lopez appeared in the original cast of A Chorus Line and was also a replacement for the role of Fastrada in the original production of Pippin in 1973. She received the Tony for her performance in A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine. Her other Broadway credits include In the Heights, Anna in the Tropics, Nine and Company. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

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London’s Forbidden Broadway Extends

first_img The current London incarnation of Forbidden Broadway stars returning alums Anna-Jane Casey and Sophie-Louise Dann, alongside Damian Humbley and Ben Lewis. Duck and cover! London’s Forbidden Broadway is sticking around. Originally scheduled to run through August 16, the comedy revue by Gerard Alessandrini will now play its final performance on August 30. The show celebrated its opening night at the Menier Chocolate Factory on July 2. View Commentscenter_img Directed by Phillip George, Forbidden Broadway lampoons the best of Broadway and the West End, spoofing hit shows including The Book of Mormon, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Once, Matilda and Miss Saigon.last_img

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Chris Noth-Led Doctor Faustus Extends Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on July 12, 2015 You’ve now got a little longer to make that pact with off-Broadway! Classic Stage Company’s production of Doctor Faustus, starring Chris Noth and Tony nominee Zach Grenier, has extended through July 12; the show had been set to shutter on July 2. Performances will also now begin on June 2 instead of the previously announced May 29. Opening night remains June 18.The production features an adaptation of the Christopher Marlowe play by David Bridel and Belgrader. It’s the familiar story of pacts with the devil and the gratification and consequences that follow.Joining Noth and Grenier will be Jeff Binder, Ken Cheeseman, Carmen M. Herlihy, Walker Jones, Geoffrey Owens and Lucas Caleb Rooney.Andrei Belgrader will direct. Doctor Faustus Related Showslast_img read more

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