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Savills reports 10% rise in revenue for 2019

first_imgHigh-end international property group Savills has reported a 10% rise in revenue for the 2019 financial year, with profits before tax stable at £143.4m.The company also reported a strong first two months to 2020, but expressed concerns for the outlook because of the Coronavirus outbreak.The company’s annual report said performance had been “resilient” through 2019 thanks to its global spread of business operations.Group revenue was up 10% to £1.93bn, compared with £1.76bn in 2018, driven by a strong increase of 16% in non-sales business such as property management, which represented 57% of annual revenue.Underlying profit before tax was £143.4m, down by £300,000 compared with 2018. However the figure included a £3.5m cut in profit from the implementation of the IFRS 16 accounting standard, which changes the way leases are accounted for on the balance sheet.Statutory profit before tax increased by 6% to £115.6m compared with £109.4m in 2018.Underlying basic earnings per share are 78.0p, up from 77.8p in 2018. Statutory basic earnings per share increased 8% to 60.6p from 56.2p.Final ordinary and supplementary interim dividends are up 3% to total 32.0p per share from 31.2p.Operating highlightsTransaction advisory revenue grew by 2%, led by North America, Europe and the Middle East.Property and facilities management revenue was up 17% while consultancy revenue grew 15%.UK profits increased by 7% to £81.9m, led by property management and consultancy.Savills UK residential arm grew revenues by 6%, outperforming the decline in UK market volumes.Meanwhile continued growth in North America, driven by residential sales, saw revenue up 11% and underlying profit up 35% to £17.3m.Savills Investment Management reported a record year with revenue up 19%, profits up 65% to £18.1m and assets under management up 8% to £17.7bn. There was an increase of £3.1bn in inflows, up 29% on 2018 (£2.4bn). savills full year results Savills estate agents March 13, 2020Richard ReedWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Savills reports 10% rise in revenue for 2019 previous nextAgencies & PeopleSavills reports 10% rise in revenue for 2019Profits are stable at the blue-chip estate agency after a ‘resilient’ performance in 2019 – but fears grow over Coronavirus.Richard Reed13th March 20200821 Viewslast_img read more

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NHS cuts cause fears for student welfare

first_imgOxfordshire’s mental health services have announced cuts in their psychiatric department, leading to criticism by a University psychiatric expert amid concern that this could lead to an increase in suicides across the county.Oxfordshire Mental Health National Health Service Trust has proposed plans to axe Barnes Unit’s psychiatric accident and emergency service, located at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Headington, as well as cut back on 23% of its junior doctors and 12% of its consultants. Such cutbacks are part of the trust’s plan to save £6m, 10% of its budget. Professor Keith Hawton, the director of Oxford University’s Centre for Suicide Research, has said “this will undermine care for some of Oxfordshire’s most vulnerable people. There is potential risk for an increase in suicides.”The Barnes Unit cares for approximately 1,765 people a year who arrive at the John Radcliffe Hospital after self-harming or attempted suicide. Psychologists and medical staff at the unit provide specialist assessments, treatment and follow-up advice. Professor Hawton believes that students at Oxford will be particularly vulnerable to the cutbacks. “I think this could have major consequences for the service for students who are presented to hospital following self-harm.” Suicide is a particularly prominant issue affecting students of the University. In August of this year, a verdict of suicide was declared for a prospective student who was due to have come up last academic year, but was found drowned off Beachy Head just days before the start of term.Hawton took part in an influencial study published in 1995 which found that there was a significantly higher rate of suicide amongst eighteen to twenty-five year olds, compared to the general population over a fourteen year period. If the unit is axed, some of the services will be transferred to the Crisis Resolution Team based at Littlemore Hospital, which is located further out of the city centre, close to the Blackbird Leys area. Professor Hawton said of the transfer to Littlemore “I think it unlikely that any substitute clinical service which already has major commitments elsewhere will be able to give the time necessary.” Oxford University Student Union Vice-President (Welfare), Aidan Randle-Conde, expressed his concerns about the trust’s proposals stating that “with many students experiencing issues of self-harm and suicidal feelings the cutbacks will create major problems across the University.”ARCHIVE: 1st week MT 2005last_img read more

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Gaza scholarship

first_imgA meeting was held at Jesus College this week to solidify plans for a scholarship for students from the Gaza strip in Palestine.The College plans to raise funding for  a scholarship which would enable one student a year from the Islamic University in Gaza to study at Oxford.The Gazan university was partially destroyed in attacks near the end of the 2008-2009 Gaza War. Science, engineering, and medical facilities were the worst affected.At the time, Oxford’s Senior Proctor declared that “efforts to attract endowments to fund scholarships at Oxford for the most academically talented Palestinian students, to help lessen some of the obstacles to education that now prevail, would be welcome.”A similar scholarship to was set up in 2009 at St. Edmund Hall, and there is now a Palestinian scholar reading Engineering.Last term students at Jesus sought to emulate Teddy Hall. Motions were passed in both the JCR and MCR to provide the scholarship fund.Student Emily Dreyfus set up the Jesus College Scholarship Committee, which is working to find sources for funding the leftover expenses and also speaking to tutors in the pertinent fields for the purposes of the scholarship.A portion of the scholarship is funded by members of the JCR and MCR at £5 per student per term and a charitable foundation, and the rest funded through a fees waiver.“There was some opposition from the members of the Common Rooms,” said Dreyfus. “Most of it involved questions of, ‘Why Gaza?’”In response, last Thursday a discussion was held at Jesus where speakers delivered presentations on the situation in Gaza was and a Q&A session was held to answer any questions concerning the scholarship.Attendees included Dr. Swee Ang, co-founder of Medical Aid for Palestinians, as well as Dr. Karma Nabulsi, University Lecturer in International Relations and Fellow in Politics at St. Edmund Hall.Ang shared a slideshow presentation of her time spent working for Red Crescent after the 1982 invasion of Lebanon, and her subsequent visits during the Gaza War.Nabulsi spoke of her personal history in Palestine and her current involvement with the organisers of the scholarship at Jesus.She expressed her hope that the initiatives to fund these types of scholarships occur in “one JCR after another so that it becomes institutionalised.”Tracing the success of the push for these scholarships back to the occupation of the Clarendon building in January 2009, Nabulsi said, “The students who occupied the libraries made simple demands. They demanded we make connections.”last_img read more

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White House Reporter, Author April Ryan To Keynote 2020 USI Martin Luther King, Jr….

first_imgApril Ryan, journalist, political correspondent and award-winning author, will provide the keynote address at the University of Southern Indiana’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Monday, January 20, 2020 in Carter Hall located in University Center West on the USI campus.Since 1997, Ryan has served as the only black female White House correspondent, covering four presidential administrations for American Urban Radio Networks as their Washington D.C. bureau chief. She was named the recipient of the Freedom of the Press Award by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in 2019, and Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists in 2017. Ryan is one of only three African Americans in the White House Correspondents Association’s over 100-year history to serve on its board and is also an esteemed member of the National Press Club.Ryan’s first book, The Presidency in Black and White: My Up-Close View of Three Presidents and Race in America (2015), received an Image Award from the NAACP. Her latest book, Under Fire: Reporting from the Front Lines of the Trump White House, was published in 2018, and details her experience as a presidential reporter in the current administration. She joined CNN as a political analyst in 2017, and regularly posts on her personal blog, Fabric of America. Ryan has a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Morgan State University in her hometown of Baltimore, Maryland.Tickets are now available for USI students and employees and will be available for the general public beginning Monday, December 16. All tickets may be purchased online on the USI website beginning on Monday, December 16 or in person at the USI Multicultural Center, located at Room 1224 in University Center East. Tickets are $5 for USI students, $15 for USI employees and $20 for the general public.The annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Luncheon features a prominent, successful African American keynote speaker and attracts a large crowd from throughout the community. The luncheon encourages and inspires attendees to continue working for the cause of racial equality, for which King gave his life. The event is sponsored by the USI Foundation and the USI Multicultural Center and will include entertainment by student and community groups.For more information, contact the USI Multicultural Center at 812-465-7188 or at USI.edu/mcc.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Ocean City Crew Boosters is sponsoring a Beef & Beverage at Sketties on Friday,…

first_imgSketties is located at 301 Roosevelt Blvd | Marmora, NJ Ocean City Crew Boosters is sponsoring a Beef & Beverage at Sketties (Roosevelt Boulevard, Marmora) on Friday, April 20th.  The Ocean City High School Crew program is mainly funded the Crew Booster fundraisers. In order to keep our rowers competitive on the water, we need to constantly update our equipment.  Boats, oars, motors for launches, are purchased through fundraising.  With your help, we can make this a fun and successful evening! Thank you for your support!To purchase tickets contact: Tom Sigmund : [email protected] Japzon: [email protected]last_img

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Watch Lettuce Perform New Song “Blaze” On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]

first_imgJam Cruise has shared a pro-shot video of Lettuce performing big on the Norwegian Pearl from earlier this year. Regular suspects on “the boat,” the New York funk lords played two sets over the course of four nights during the 2017 event. For their first performance, the funk powerhouse charged through the Stardust Theater with another spectacular set. When Adam Deitch (drums), Jesus Coomes (bass), Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff (guitar), Neal Evans (keys), Nigel Hall (keys, vocals) and The Shady Horns’ saxophonist Ryan Zoidis and trumpeter Eric “Benny” Bloom are on the same stage, great, firing things happen – such as been the case for the last 25 years!See below for their performance of “Blaze,” a song expected to be on the band’s upcoming record. Featuring some especially psychedelic playing from Zoidis, “Blaze” just might be the new funk anthem of the future. Shortly after this video was shared, drummer Adam Deitch wrote on Facebook that the song would appear on the band’s upcoming album. Check it out below:Don’t miss Lettuce at their inaugural Funk of Ages this summer, along with a summer full of festivals including North Coast Music Fest!last_img read more

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Food safety’s big cheese

first_imgMorgan RoanUniversity of GeorgiaDr. Elsa A. Murano, secretary of Food Safety and Inspection Service for the United States Department of Agriculture, will deliver this year’s Woodroof Lecture at the University of Georgia in Athens.Set for Thursday, April 22, at 2 p.m., the lecture will be held in Masters Hall at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education. A reception will follow at 3 p.m.Murano will speak on “Legislating Logic: Infusing Science into Food Safety Regulations.” Sworn into her position by Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman on October 2, 2001, Murano oversees the policies and programs of the nation’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.Before joining USDA, from 2001 until her appointment, Murano served as a member of the USDA National Advisory Committee for Meat and Poultry Inspection. Since 1998 she also served on the National Alliance for Food Safety Operations Committee, which she chaired in 2000.She has extensive public and private experience in the field of food safety and has held several positions with Texas A&M University at College Station, Texas. Most recently, she served as the director of the university’s Center for Food Safety within the Institute of Food Science and Engineering. While at Texas A&M, she also served on the university’s Department of Animal Science Research Advisory Committee, the Food Safety Response Team of the Texas Agriculture Extension Service, and chaired the Food Safety State Initiative Committee of the Texas Agriculture Experiment Station.Prior to her Texas appointment, Murano served as a professor-in-charge of research programs at the Linear Accelerator Facility at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.She was a member of several professional organizations, which included the American Society for Microbiology, the Association of Meat Science, the Institute of Food Technologists, the Poultry Science Association, and the International Association of Food Protection.A native of Havana, Cuba, Murano holds a B.S. degree in biological sciences from Florida International University in Miami, a M.S. degree in anaerobic microbiology and a Ph.D. in food science and technology, both from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va. The Woodroof Lecture is presented annually in honor and memory of Dr. J.G. Woodroof, a pioneer in food science research and UGA Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus. The lecture is sponsored by the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology and the UGA Food Science and Technology Club.The Woodroof Lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology at (706) 542-2286.last_img read more

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Peanut flavor

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaA peanut’s taste has a lot to do with when it’s harvested, says a University of Georgia professor.A peanut that can muster a “roasted peanutty” taste is the crème de la crème of the peanut butter industry, which most Georgia peanuts are grown to supply, said John Beasley, a crop scientist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.But sometimes after being processed, a peanut can have an off flavor, tasting a little like paint or cardboard, among other things a peanut shouldn’t taste like, he said.Beasley has conducted research over the past three years to learn, along with yield data, how newer peanut varieties and an established variety taste, when harvested early, on time and late.In randomized tests, he harvested newer peanut varieties like Carver, AP-3, C-99R, Georgia-01R and Georgia-02C 10 days early, on time and 10 days late. He did the same with the industry standard variety, Georgia Green.Selected peanuts were sent to two flavor-testing labs. Across the board, the time of harvest dictated how tasty the peanuts were, he said. Peanuts harvested too early had an off flavor.But waiting too long to harvest can be bad, too. A farmer can lose as much as 300 pounds per acre in yields if peanuts are harvested too late. Georgia farmers averaged about 2,870 pounds per acre last year.”But Georgia has maintained a reputation for having the best, most consistent-tasting peanuts around because our growers get the crop in when it needs to come in,” Beasley said. “We need to continue doing this, because the peanut industry is competitive, and consumers will taste the difference.”Not all peanuts are equal. They don’t mature at the same time. Late-maturing varieties take 155-160 days to mature. Mid-maturing varieties take 135-140 days.But environmental conditions can throw maturity dates off, he said.That’s why farmers need to use the hull-scrape method and not just count days. With the hull-scrape method, the thin, outer-layer of the shell is scraped off. The hue of the remaining shell is compared to a profile board. The darker the hue, the more mature the peanut is. “It’s still the best way to know the maturity of peanuts,” Beasley said.Although new varieties are making their way into farmers’ fields, the workhorse continues to be Georgia Green. The UGA peanut breeding program released it in 1995 as a mid-maturing, disease-resistant, high-yielding and flavorful peanut. It alone accounted for 70 percent of Georgia’s 755,000 acres last year.Tomato spotted wilt virus hit Georgia peanuts hard last year. It infected about 8 percent of the crop, a level not seen since the mid-1990s, when the disease became the primary concern for the industry.”Farmers and the peanut industry are always looking for more disease-resistant, higher-performing varieties,” Beasley said.And the peanut consumer will always be the final judge, he said.Cool, dry weather in the fall of 1986 prompted many Southern farmers to harvest peanuts early. That resulted in many immature peanuts making it into peanut butter. The problem soon became obvious, when the industry started getting reports of sour-tasting peanut butter.Some Georgia farmers have started planting peanuts this year. But using a UGA index that helps farmers reduce the risk of tomato spotted wilt virus, most now plant peanuts in mid-May. They harvest them in late September and October.last_img read more

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California, Hawaii markets drive surge in residential storage

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The historically tiny residential energy storage segment won big in Q1 2018, according to the latest deployment data.Utility-scale projects, the usual workhorse of the energy storage industry, dropped massively compared to last year’s Q1, when the Aliso Canyon procurements came online and set a record for energy capacity. What saved the quarter from historically low performance turned out to be the aggregate growth of all the little systems popping up in customers’ homes.“Residential storage has been growing in popularity and prominence,” said Brett Simon, senior analyst at GTM Research. “It’s getting cheaper. Folks are more aware of it and are asking for it. Solar installers are doubling down on it as a new business model.”Residential deployments beat commercial deployments, 15.9 megawatts to 11.7 megawatts, according to the latest Energy Storage Monitor from GTM Research and the Energy Storage Association. Even more impressively, home batteries rivaled utility-scale deployments, which only clocked in at 16 megawatts.That’s an unprecedented and jolting development that is worth emphasizing. Ever since GTM Research began tracking storage deployments in 2013, residential batteries appeared as the faintest of slivers on the industrywide bar graph, nonzero but totally insubstantial.Dialing into the numbers, it’s clear that California and Hawaii drove this newfound strength with state-level growth that merits no less than the technical designation: “bonkers.”More: Residential batteries almost beat out utility-scale deployments last quarter California, Hawaii markets drive surge in residential storagelast_img read more

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Carlisle Sports & Outdoors Nationals

first_imgTop Races and Events to hit before the end of the year:Carlisle Sports & Outdoor NationalsWhen: September 6, 2013 – September 8, 2013Where: Carlisle Fairgrounds, Carlisle, PennsylvaniaWhat: Outdoors FestivalWebsite: www.CarlisleSportsOutdoor.com September 6-8, 2013 at the Carlisle PA Fairgrounds! Buy, Sell and Trade Everything Outdoor-Related. PA State Knife and Tomahawk Championships, Archery Shoots, Calling Contests, Gun Show, Powersports Demos, Interactive Seminars and more. Win a Ford Raptor or ride in a Monster Truck!The Sports and Outdoor Nationals will be unlike any other sports and outdoor themed event in the region. The weekend will feature a wide array of interactive and hands on events for enthusiasts of all ages, a swap meet for buying and selling used gear, equipment and apparel as well as a corral that will host everything from ATV’s to RV’s, boats to the trucks that pull them, campers and more. In addition, there will be safety courses, seminars and more offered, while an off road course is also planned for those wanting to get a little mud on the tires. Whether you hunt, fish, hike, race, camp or just love to enjoy what Mother Nature has to offer, this event is just for you.Visit CarlisleSportsOutdoor.com for [email protected] Check out our Fall Race Ahead Guide, for the top 25 races and events for the rest of the year!last_img read more

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