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Man who wielded baseball bat outside school is spared prison sentence

first_imgA MAN who threatened a neighbour with a baseball bat has been spared a prison sentence.Jerry Awalusi (48) then of 26 Caislean Court, Castlefin and now with an address in Killygordon, appeared before Letterkenny District Court in connection with an incident at Hill Head, Castlefin on June 6, 2019.  Sergeant Jim Collins told the Court that Awalusi followed Kevin Boyce to a local national school, where the victim dropped off his two children.Awalusi approached Boyce, shouting in an aggressive manner, accusing Mr Boyce of keeping him awake the previous night and alleging that he was making a loud noise as he rearranged furniture in his home.Awalusi produced a stainless steel baseball bat and waved it aggressively at Mr Boyce.The incident was captured by CCTV.Solicitor for Awalusi, Mr Michael Shiel, said the incident was ‘purely out of frustration’.“He realises at this stage that what he did was completely wrong,” Mr Shiel said.“There has been a history between the pair and the relationship is not very good. This was the straw that broke the camel’s back.”Awalusi, who has four previous assault conviction and one for producing an article capable of inflicting serious injury.Judge Paul Kelly said it was a ‘very marginal call’ and warned Awalusi that he faces a ‘lengthy jail sentence’ should he appear before him on similar charges.Awalusi was sentenced to 80 hours of community service, in lieu of three months imprisonment.  Man who wielded baseball bat outside school is spared prison sentence was last modified: November 6th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:castlefinJerry AwalusiJudge Paul KellyletterkennyLetterkenny District Courtlast_img read more

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Australian league CEO in favor of Andrew Bogut playing for the Warriors again next season

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – If not for Andrew Bogut’s return, perhaps the CEO of Australia’s National Basketball League would not have attended a recent Warriors game.Jeremy Loeliger also would not have been in the Bay Area this week to meet with Facebook, Google, Twitter and Amazon officials. Once Bogut opted out of his contract with the Sydney Kings and returned to the Warriors, …last_img

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Fishing the North Coast: Saltwater season back in full swing

first_imgAfter sitting on the sidelines watching the wind blow for more than a week, it finally relented, allowing our saltwater fishing season to resume. Salmon, rockfish, and halibut were all attainable the last couple days. And that should be the case through the weekend as the weather looks to remain fishable.Early in the week, the salmon bite was decent despite the influx of cold water. “The most striking development following a windy week was the frigid water that moved in, ranging from 47 to 51 …last_img

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Producers with trees and vines have an additional option in expensing planting costs for tax purposes

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The following contains edited material from the “National Income Tax Workbook 2016” Land Grant University Tax Education Foundation Inc.Fruit and nut growers have few options in the way they expense planting and preparatory costs. New regulations that are a part of the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act (signed into law on Dec. 18, 2015) allow for taxpayers to use bonus depreciation to partially expense these costs in the year of planting even if the taxpayer might not have been allowed to under the Alternative Depreciation Schedule (ADS) due to opting out of Uniform Capitalization (UNICAP) rules.Generally, the UNICAP rules require farmers to capitalize the preproductive period costs if the plants have a preproductive period of more than 2 years. Pre­productive period costs are the costs of raising plants after they are planted and before they are placed in service.Plants are treated as placed in service when they produce a crop that has a value in excess of the cost of harvesting it. Therefore, the placed-in-service date can vary from one grower to another and from one block of a grower’s plants to another. For tax purposes however, the determination that a plant has a preproductive period of more than two years is based on the national average preproductive period for that plant. Therefore, whether a plant is subject to capitalization of preproductive expenses does not vary from one grower to another or from one block of plants to another.However, farmers (other than corporations, partnerships, and tax shelters that are required to use accrual accounting) can elect out of the UNI­CAP rules. The election out of the UNICAP rules allows farmers to deduct preproductive period costs in the year they are incurred.Preproductive period costs are the costs of cultivating, maintaining, or developing the plant during the preproductive period. Pre­productive period costs include, but are not lim­ited to, management, irrigation, pruning, soil and water conservation (including costs the taxpayer has elected to deduct under I.R.C.§ 175), fertil­izing (including costs the taxpayer has elected to deduct under I.R.C.§ 180), frost protection, spray­ing, harvesting, storage and handling, upkeep, electricity, tax depreciation and repairs on build­ings and equipment used in raising the plants, farm overhead, taxes (except state and federal income taxes), and interest required to be capital­ized under Internal Revenue Code Section (I.R.C.§) 263A(f).Even if the plants are not subject to the UNICAP rules either because their preproductive period is 2 years or less or because the farmer elected out of the UNICAP rules, the farmer must still capi­talize the preparatory costs (costs incurred so that the plant’s growing process may begin) for the plants, such as the costs of seeds, seedlings, plants, supplies, labor, and equipment.Section 143 of the PATH Act adds a new option for some farmers to deduct bonus depreciation. The new option is in addition to the bonus depre­ciation rules that were in place before the PATH Act.New I.R.C. § 168(k)(5) allows farmers to elect to deduct 50% of the cost of planting or grafting specified plants. Farmers make the election and claim the deduction in the year the plants are planted (or grafted to a plant that has already been planted). To qualify, the plants must be planted or grafted after Dec. 31, 2015, and before Jan. 1, 2020, and must be:A tree or vine that bears fruits or nuts, orAny other plant that will have more than one yield of fruits or nuts and that generally has a preproductive period of more than two years from the time of planting or grafting to the time at which it begins bearing fruits or nuts.The farmer must reduce the basis of the plant by the allowable bonus depreciation, and he or she may not claim any additional bonus depre­ciation on the plant in the year it is placed in service. When the plant is placed in service, the farmer may claim the section 179 deduction and/or Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) depreciation on the remaining basis. General Bonus Depreciation rulesProperty does not have to qualify for the general bonus depreciation to be eligible for the special elective bonus depreciation for plants that bear fruit or nuts. Therefore, it does not have to meet the following requirements:The recovery period for the property is 20 years or less.The original use of the property commenced with the taxpayer.In addition, property that must be depreciated under ADS is eligible property. Benefits of the new legislationThe new legislation not only allows farmers who elect out of the UNICAP rules to claim bonus depreciation they previously could not claim, it also allows farmers (whether or not they elect out of the UNICAP rules) to claim the bonus depre­ciation in the year the plants are planted instead of the year the plants are placed in service.Deducting the bonus depreciation in an ear­lier year has two benefits. As with any deduction allowed in an earlier year, it allows the taxpayer to reap the benefit of the deduction in an earlier year, which postpones paying taxes in most cases. Deducting bonus depreciation in an earlier year also allows farmers to avoid the phaseout of the bonus depreciation for plants that were planted before 2018 but will not be placed in service until 2018 or a later year.last_img read more

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Ohio’s National FFA Officers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With 33, Ohio has the most National FFA Officers of any state. For National FFA Week, we thought we would highlight Ohio’s talented former National Officers.Here are Ohio’s National FFA officers:Lawrence Augustine, from Ashley, served as the National FFA Second Vice President in 1928-1929.Ralph Bender, from Waldo, served as National Eastern Region Vice President in 1930-1931. From 1948-78, he was Chairman of the Department of Agricultural Education at OSU. He taught agricultural education at several universities in the United States and worked with other countries to help them develop agricultural education programs.Bobby Jones, from Radnor, served as National FFA President
 in 1933-1934 and then worked at World’s Natural Science in Rochester, NY.Stanley Tschantz, from the Wayne County JVS, served as Eastern Region Vice President in 1935-1936.William Stiers, from the Twin Valley South Chapter, served as Eastern Region Vice President in 1937-1938.Carl Fought, from the Fremont Chapter, served as Eastern Region Vice President in 1941-1942.Philip Shober, from the Mohawk Chapter, served as the National Secretary in 1946-1947.Glenn Lackey, from the Berlin Township (now Olentangy) Chapter, served as Vice President in 1949-50. After WWII, he started the VoAg Program at Pickerington High School.Dallas High, from the Van West-Marsh Chapter, served as a National Vice President in 1951-1952.Dale Ring, from the Wooster Chapter, served as a National Vice President in 1955-1956. He then raised dairy cattle and row crops and served as the president of the Ohio Holstein Association and Ohio Beef Council.Jerome Donovan, Jr., from the Delaware Chapter, served as National Vice President from 1960-1961. He taught science at Delaware Hayes H.S. in 1963 and then ag business at Delaware Area Career Center in 1973, where he became an administrator. After 39 years of teaching he retired in 2004.James Stitzlein, from the Loudenville Chapter, served as a National Vice President from 1965-1966. Jim works with Consolidated Grain and Barge and lives near St. Louis.Keaton Vandemark, from the Elida Chapter, served as a National Vice President in 1966-1967.Dennis C. Sargent, from the Bradford Chapter, served as National Secretary in 1971-1972. He devoted his career to working in education, industry and business. He served as the executive director of the FFA Foundation.Doug Loudenslager, from the Ridegdale Chapter, served as the 1975-1976 National Eastern Region Vice President. He went on to serve as an agricultural instructor at Cory-Rawson High School, communications manager for the Ohio Farmers Grain and Supply Association, executive director of the Ohio Soybean Association, and COO of the National FFA Organization. He is now secretary on the Board of Trustees for Evolution Ag, LLC and principal for the Delaware location.Rick McDaniel, from the Wynford Chapter, served as the 1976-1977 National Eastern Region Vice President.Rob Hovis, from the Lakota Chapter, served as the 1977-1978 National Eastern Region Vice President. He now serves as a financial officer for Edward Jones of Millersburg.Mark Sanborn, from the Grand Valley Chapter, served as the National FFA President in 1978-1979. He is now president of Sanborn & Associates, Inc., an idea studio dedicated to developing leaders in business and in life. He is also an international bestselling author and noted authority on leadership, team building, customer service and change.Susie (Barrett) Bline, from the Warren Chapter, was Ohio’s first female National Officer, serving as the 1980-1981 National Eastern Region Vice President. She resides with her husband on a Champaign County farm where they raise sheep. She is also an elementary math teacher.Bruce Kettler, from the Anna Chapter, served as the 1982-1983 National Eastern Region Vice President. He now serves as the Director of Public Relations for Beck’s Hybrids.Warren Boerger, from the Fairbanks Chapter, served as the 1988-1989 National Eastern Region Vice President. He now is the head of North American Business Services for Syngenta Seeds.Dan Schroer, from the New Bremen Chapter, was the 1989-1990 National Eastern Region Vice President. He now serves as the Superintendent of Springboro Schools in Warren County. He also served as the superintendent for the Greene County Career Center in Xenia with over 900 full-time equivalent secondary and adult students. He has served as the program director for Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum and a teacher and administrator for various schools around Ohio as well.Rick Perkins, from the Sentinel CC Chapter, served as the 1992-1993 National Eastern Region Vice President. He is now Vice President at PNC Financial Services.Lee Schroeder, from the Leipsic Chapter, was the 1994-1995 National Eastern Region Vice President. He graduated from Ohio State’s College of Law in 2002. He is currently an agriculture attorney in real estate, business, and estate/succession planning for northwest Ohio farmers and agribusinesses at the firm “Schroeder, Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP” in Ottawa.Holly (Bentley) Wagner, from the East Clinton Chapter, was the 1996-1997 National FFA Secretary. She is now a mom and elementary school teacher.Shannon (Wilcox) Donnelly, from the Upper Scioto Valley Chapter, served as the National FFA Secretary in 1997-1998. She worked in agribusiness and as a K-12 educator. Now she is currently co-owner/operator of WD Land & Livestock with her husband, Bruce, and daughter Meredith.Emily (Buxton) Adams, from the Riverview Chapter, was the 1998-1999 Eastern Region Vice President. She graduated from OSU with a BS and MS in food science and worked in product research and development for Abbott Nutrition in Columbus from 2003-2011. She now serves as an OSU Extension Educator for Agriculture and Natural Resources and the County Extension Director for Coshocton County.Joe Shultz, from the Indian Lake Chapter, served as the Eastern Region Vice President in 1999-2000. Shultz now serves as the senior economist for the U.S. Senate Committee of Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry in Washington, D.C.Katy (Poth) Endsley, from the Liberty Union Chapter, was the 2000-2001 Eastern Region Vice President. She currently works for the Ohio FFA Association, serving as program manager. She also teaches public speaking at Ohio University.Julie (Tyson) McNaull, from the Hillsdale Chapter, was the 2002-2003 Eastern Region Vice President. She graduated from OSU with a Bachelor’s degree in Agribusiness and Applied Economics in 2005 and with a Masters in Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics in 2007. She and her husband reside in Ashland, Ohio with three daughters. She is a stay-at-home mom on McNaull Family Farms, a grain operation with a contract swine finishing barn.Anne Knapke, from the Talawanda Chapter, was the 2003-2004 Eastern Region Vice President. She is a certified health coach and current MA/MPP graduate student at the University of Chicago, with a background in international and community development, focused on global health and food policy.Hannah Crossen, from the Hillsdale Chapter, was the 2008-2009 Eastern Region Vice President. She graduated from OSU in 2012 with a degree in agricultural and Extension education, then worked as a curriculum sales consultant for CEV Multimedia out of Lubbock, Texas. She is currently an agricultural educator and FFA advisor at North Union High School in Richwood.Sydney Snider, from the Felicity-Franklin Chapter, was the the 2015-2016 Eastern Region Vice President.  Jerome Donovan, Jr., from the Delaware Chapter, served as National Vice President from 1960-1961. Susie (Barrett) Bline, from the Warren Chapter, was Ohio’s first female National Officer, serving as the 1980-1981 National Eastern Region Vice President. Shannon (Wilcox) Donnelly (center), from the Upper Scioto Valley Chapter, served as the National FFA Secretary in 1997-1998. Holly (Bentley) Wagner (front row, second from the right), from the East Clinton Chapter, was the 1996-1997 National FFA Secretary. Julie (Tyson) McNaull, from the Hillsdale Chapter, was the 2002-2003 Eastern Region Vice President. Lee Schroeder, from the Leipsic Chapter, was the 1994-1995 National Eastern Region Vice President. Dennis C. Sargent, from the Bradford Chapter, served as National Secretary in 1971-1972. Mark Sanborn, from the Grand Valley Chapter, served as the National FFA President in 1978-1979. Katy (Poth) Endsley, (pictured with her family) from the Liberty Union Chapter, was the 2000-2001 Eastern Region Vice President. Bruce Kettler of the Anna Chapter got to meet President Reagan during his time as a National Officer. Rob Hovis, from the Lakota Chapter, served as the 1977-1978 National Eastern Region Vice President. Doug Loudenslager met with J. Patrick Kaine, President of the Agricultural Division of International Harvester, in 1976. Holly Bently Wagner, Emily Buxton Adams, Steve Gratz and Shannon Wilcox Sydney Sniderlast_img read more

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Akali Dal to challenge CBI’s closure report in sacrilege case

first_imgThe Shiromani Akali Dal on Tuesday rejected the CBI’s closure report on the investigation into the sacrilege of Guru Granth Sahib at Bargari in 2015 and said it would take all legal, constitutional and political steps to get the probe reopened. A decision to this effect was taken at a meeting of the core committee of the party here. Spokesperson Harcharan Singh Bains said it was decided that a party delegation would call on Union Home Minister Amit Shah and urge him to intervene in the matter for the withdrawal of the closure report. “There is no justification in filing the closure report by the CBI. The Sikh organisations have been demanding a probe by the Central agency as these bodies expressed lack of faith in the probe being conducted by the Special Investigation Team of the Punjab police,” he said. Party president Sukhbir Singh Badal said he had been taken aback. “The culprits are still to be charged, tried and punished. People want the entire truth behind the tragic sacrilege incidents to be fully brought into the open, criminals to be identified and given the severest punishment under the law of the land,” said Mr. Badal.last_img read more

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Deja vu as Horn pulls off a Bradley on Pacquiao

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trainer Atlas blasts Horn’s UD win: You’re not supposed to get it for trying hard Five years ago, Pacquiao suffered a highly-disputed defeat to Bradley by split decision despite out-boxing the American throughout the bout.READ: NBA players, US celebrities upset over Horn win, say PacquiaoFEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsAgainst Bradley, the CompuBox, which records the number of punches thrown and landed by both boxers, depicted that Pacquiao landed 253 total punches as compared to the American’s 159. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony PLAY LIST 00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony01:06Manny Pacquiao trains in LA for last time before Keith Thurman fight01:49Pacquiao to Mayweather: Want fans to stop asking for rematch? Then fight me again02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Against Horn, Pacquiao also out-landed his foe, 182 to 92, despite the Aussie throwing 52 more punches.Pacquiao thew 573 punches in total, 32% of which hit Horn. The Filipino ring legend also landed 123 power shots as compared to Horn’s 73.READ: Horn stuns Pacquiao for unanimous decision winAll three judges scored in favor of the hometown bet, 117-111, 115-113, 115-113, to the delight of the packed Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane.Bradley, who is now a boxing commentator, is actually in attendance, calling the fight alongside his trainer Teddy Atlas, who couldn’t hide dismay over the unanimous decision win.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend What ‘missteps’? Horn answers questions about his victory over Pacquiao8.2K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 View comments MOST READ LATEST STORIES Manny Pacquiao’s shocking loss to Jeff Horn on Sunday in Brisbane, Australia was deja vu.Pacquiao dropped a unanimous decision and yielded his WBO welterweight title to Horn in controversial fashion that brought back memories of the Filipino ring icon’s stunning setback at the hands of Timothy Bradley in 2012.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Australian girls supreme in gymnastics

first_imgAustralia made it a grand double in team gymnastics when their women took top honours at the Indira Gandhi Sports Complex on Tuesday.The Aussie men had reigned supreme in the corresponding event on the first day of the Commonwealth Games and it was the turn of the girls a day later.Georgia Bonora, Ashleigh Brennan, Emily Little, Lauren Mitchell and Georgia Wheeler teamed up to add another gold to the Aussie tally. It was a similar scenario to the one in the men’s team event with England and Canada taking silver and bronze respectively.India – represented by Debjani Samanta, Priti Das, Meenakshi and Dipa Karmakar – finished eighth among as many teams. The difference between the top two teams was 5.5 points as Imogen Cairns, Laura Edwards, Jocelyn Hunt, Becky Wing and Charlotte Lindsley settled for silver.Catherine Dion, Kristine Jana Ann Klarenbach, Emma Leigh Willis, Gabrielle May and Cynthia Lemieux-Guillemette claimed bronze for Canada with 154.750 points.Malaysia, Scotland, Singapore and New Zealand finished fourth to seventh. None of the Indians qualified for the individual all-round final, but Dipa has made it as a reserve.Among individual apparatus, the Australians came first in the vault, uneven bars and floor exercises while England were best in the beam. Mitchell was the best individual on show with a tally of 56.950, followed by Little (53.600) and England’s Cairns (53.500).last_img read more

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Politics on Vijender: Indian Boxing Federation head Chautala hits back after Hooda’s jibe at boxer Vijender Singh

first_imgHaryana chief minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda’s jibe at boxer Vijender Kumar has taken a political connotation with Abhay Chautala, president of the Indian Boxing Federation, taking on his political rival.Chautala said that the chief minister publically humiliated the boxer and his comments reflect his bias against boxing since a leader belonging to the main opposition party in the state was heading the concerned federation.During a felicitation function in Chandigarh on Thursday, Hooda had told Vijender: Tu tour laganey band kar de (you stop taking tours), apparently implying that frequent modeling assignments and stints on television shows had had an adverse effect on the boxer’s performance.Vijender had tried to make light of the remark stating that he was not aware which tour the chief minister was talking about.Abhay – the Indian National Lok Dal (INLD) MLA from Ellanabad – said that the comment by the chief minister was not an advice but a taunt” aimed at the boxer.He alleged that Hooda was venting his frustration at failing to manage any of the prestigious sports bodies in India.”Vijender had brought laurels to the country at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He had won a bronze medal,” Abhay said, adding that the chief minister should have desisted from making such remarks. The INLD leader said that Hooda wasbiased” in honouring players and had not done much to promote boxing in Haryana.He alleged that the chief minister had been making announcements only to gain publicity and had not fulfilled his promises.”The chief minister had promised to set up an international boxing academy in Bhiwani.But it has not come up so far. The training centre of the Sports Authority of India (SAI) is in a bad shape. The players have been left to their own means,” Abhay added.The opposition leader also took potshots at Hooda for honouring players from other states. Only Yogeshwar Dutt among the six medallist at the London Olympics belonged to Haryana.”The chief minister claims that four of the Indian medallists belong to the state but they never represented Haryana at any level in any sporting event,” Abhay said.advertisementlast_img read more