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Southern Outlet House / Philip M Dingemanse

first_imgSave this picture!© Jonathan Wherrett+ 19 Share “COPY” Houses CopyAbout this officePhilip M DingemanseOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLauncestonHousesAustraliaPublished on July 03, 2014Cite: “Southern Outlet House / Philip M Dingemanse” 03 Jul 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldRetractable Walls – Stepped & Sloped SpacesVinyl Walls3MArchitectural Finishes DI-NOC in SkyPodsShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma EDoorsC.R. 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Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/521603/southern-outlet-house-philip-m-dingemanse Clipboard Southern Outlet House / Philip M Dingemanse Australia GHD Area:  216 m² Area:  216 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Southern Outlet House / Philip M DingemanseSave this projectSaveSouthern Outlet House / Philip M Dingemanse “COPY” Year:  CopyHouses•Launceston, Australiacenter_img Architects: Philip M Dingemanse Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/521603/southern-outlet-house-philip-m-dingemanse Clipboard City:LauncestonCountry:AustraliaMore SpecsLess SpecsText description provided by the architects. Award Jury Citation:“Designed and built by the architect, the jury was struck by his questioning of the nature of a house and its relationship to the public domain. This house is rich in exploration – from its minimal footprint and budget to its engagement with its immediate surroundings and nearby highway. Internal spaces are blurred by the split-level arrangement of private to public with an emphasis on the high-ceiling living area, which spills out onto a covered terrace. Internally, colour and texture are richly celebrated. Externally, the house is a dark shell apart from the significant and provocative northern facade overlooking the highway below. This house deserves high recognition by virtue of its character: playful and confident, modest in size, yet bold in expression.”Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettArchitects Design StatementSituated on a northeast facing slope adjacent a major arterial road, the Southern Outlet House is a site specific study of the contribution a private residence may make to the public domain and the role of architecture more broadly in a small regional centre.The core requirements of a climatically responsive and welcoming family home underpin the project. The building is sited and planned to maximize the attributes of the location and work within the constraints of a steep slope and restrictive budget.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettAdopting a strategy from early 20th Century naval camouflage, the dazzle technique is employed, not in order to conceal the mass of building, but rather to manipulate its public face, adjust its scale, and suggest another dimension to the otherwise flat facade. The building acknowledges people passing by in vehicles at speed, as well as those living on the hill opposite who view back to the static object.The public face is perhaps changed in its form and nature and becomes just another highway directional sign, vehicle, billboard or piece of public art.Ultimately the scheme is the inevitable consequence of a situation where the owner, architect and builder are the same person.Save this picture!Floor PlanConceptual frameworkBroadly, three key themes underpinned the entire decision making process during design and construction.i. The opportunities and consequences of a situation where the owner, architect and builder are the same person.ii. The opportunities and constraints of pushing a limited budget while remaining true to the core brief requirement of making a comfortable and welcoming family home which is closely connected to outside and the garden.iii. The specific site opportunities and contribution a private residence may make to the public domain.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettPublic and Cultural BenefitsAdopting a strategy from early 20th Century naval camouflage, the dazzle technique is employed, not in order to conceal the mass of building, but rather to manipulate its public face, adjust its scale, and suggest another dimension to the otherwise flat facade. The building acknowledges people passing by in vehicles at speed, as well as those living on the hill opposite who view back to the static object. The impact of heavy vehicle traffic and large rectangular loads are transformed and referenced in the formal strategy, and ultimately most literally in the addition of truck lights to define the roof edge. The public face is perhaps changed in its form and nature and becomes just another highway directional sign, vehicle, billboard or piece of public art.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettRelationship of Built Form to ContextThe steep site is mediated by defining a finished floor level and single storey roof level as close as practicable to the natural ground to ensure vehicular access. The entire building then stretches out across the slope with the continuous roof line eventually becoming 2 storeys high. The building volumes step down the slope below the roof line. This strategy ensured a single building section and roof / gutter detail linked to managing budget and buildability. The built form grows large in its context from some viewpoints, yet is also diminutive from others. A 6m deep plan contributes to the reduction in scale of the east and west elevations. Further the dark façade colour of the three elevations immediately adjacent the neighboring properties, lessens the visual impact of the building.Save this picture!Site PlanProgram ResolutionA high ceiling to the living area is accommodated and near level access to the garden from the living is ensured. Each living space then has a very different connection and experience of the site and broader context. The terrace and outdoor living space focuses on the foreground garden, native bush and high level foliage. The dining wall opening removes the foreground and focuses on the city view opposite and mountains beyond. The lounge incorporates both the arterial road and distant views beyond.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettCost / Value OutcomeActing as owner and builder contributed significantly to a low cost outcome.Further, efficient planning and limiting the built floor area assisted in managing the budget. The terrace and outdoor living area becomes a protected extension of the internal living area, doubles its size but is relatively low cost. High cost building products were used strategically to maximize their effectiveness ie. red polycarbonate stair divider and night light. Costly elements such as kitchen joinery are limited by having bulk of storage and further functionality in an ancillary space, which also utilises the full ceiling height.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettSustainabilityThe building structure is entirely plantation timber frame construction and the interior is lined with Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified plywood. The entire building envelope is insulated beyond minimum building code requirements and mineral wool insulation is augmented with a high performance rigid phenolic insulation board. All façade cladding is installed over a batten to form a fully ventilated external skin and ensures condensation and moisture is not trapped within the building envelope.Northeast orientation, minimal southern openings, protected western openings and double glazed windows contribute to a well performing building envelope in a heating climate. The limited building floor area -144m2 of thermally controlled habitable space – reduces use of building materials.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettPlywood lining to the entire interior provides a natural warm quality, negated the need of a drywall sub contractor, and ensured absolute control and use of all the material, reducing waste and cost. Photovoltaic cells, and evacuated tube hot water heating are installed together with efficient lighting fixtures. Hot water storage is located centrally.The patterned Northeast façade incorporates a sustainable plantation sourced compressed wood fibre cladding product.High levels of thermal control of the building envelope, good solar orientation, and utilisation of energy efficient technologies limit current and future running costs together with long term environmental impact.Save this picture!© Jonathan WherrettResponse to Client and User NeedsThe opportunities of the building section are maximized. Though relatively small in floor area, the high ceiling of the living area provides an air of generosity. Higher up in the volume, a studio area views across the living spaces while a large work bench forms a lower ceiling to the sunken lounge below, thereby providing a more intimate and sheltered area within the larger volume. The children’s area has capacity to be separated into 2 spaces needs change with age. They also have their own access to the garden.Project gallerySee allShow lessArchDaily Editors Select: Our Favorite Projects in the USAArchitecture News20 Scholarships the AA BILBAO Visiting School: COMPUTING TOPOS III 2014 / Bilbao, SpainEvent Share photographs:  Jonathan WherrettPhotographs:  Jonathan Wherrett Builder: Philip M Dingemanse, EF & CA Dingemanse Photographs Year:  2013 Structural Consultant: Projects 2013last_img

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