imjirooxa

Hunters now claims to be the UK’s third largest estate agency by properties sold

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Hunters now claims to be the UK’s third largest estate agency by properties sold previous nextAgencies & PeopleHunters now claims to be the UK’s third largest estate agency by properties soldClaim is made by the chain within its 2019 full-year results in which the company also reveals that it will soon unveil a huge investment in productivity and CRM tech.Nigel Lewis30th January 20201 Comment3,312 Views  Hunters has today claimed that last year it became the third largest estate agency by number of properties sold SSTC following a robust performance from its business last year.The company says the claim is based on Rightmove figures which show that it sold almost 11,000 properties last year, placing it behind Purplebricks and Countrywide.Its CEO Glynis Frew has also revealed that the company is about to announce a major investment in tech to improve productivity and its CRM capabilities.Its sales operation helped the franchise-focussed chain enjoy a strong year last year which included overall group revenue up by 7% to £42.4 million.Hunters has also been opening branches at a galloping pace with 20 new high street launches last year.This is in stark contrast to its rivals including LSL, which last year closed, merged or transferred over 100 branches. Hunters now has 206 offices across the including those acquired following the opening of its first covering Scotland in October last year.Hoover upAnd like rival Belvoir, Hunters’ head office has been busy helping fund and organise franchisees hoover up local independent lettings businesses as their owners either throw in the towel or retire.Hunters helped its branches acquire seven lettings portfolios over the past 18 months which helped boost the company’s overall network lettings income by 12% last year.“These figures come against the backdrop of the tenant fee ban introduced in June of last year,” says Glynis Frew, its Chief Executive (above).“Market conditions were challenging in 2019 but we executed a carefully considered strategy to deliver yet another set of fantastic results.”Read more about hunters   Hunters results Hunters 2019 results Hunters third largest Glynis Frew January 30, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 30th January 2020 at 3:55 pmFrom my own data as an industry analyst, last year Hunters – who I think are a very professional outfit – exchanged on over 11,200 sales.But Your Move pipped them by actually exchanging on over 12,000.And Connells and Sequence two agencies under one umbrella exchanged on over 22,000 sales.What is interesting of course is that both Hunters and Right Move have within them franchises, whereas Skipton Building society favours the traditional corporate structure and does it very well.I do have the figures for other agents, including my friends at Countrywide, but my allegiance to the brand, although it was three decades since I worked for them, prevents me from disclosing their results.It does amaze me how some agents get it right and some so wrong, a bit like two agents in the same town, one will make a £500,000 profit and the one across the road will make considerably less, and yet from the outside they look the same. As ever it is what goes on inside and who up above is controlling the strategy.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

imjirooxa

IS IT TRUE JULY 21, 2017

first_imgIS IT TRUE that the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles has finally agreed to repay motorists more than $62 million in excessive fees to settle a long-running class-action lawsuit?…More than 5 million Hoosiers and former Hoosiers customers qualify for refunds under the agreement, which was approved recently in Marion Superior Court and became effective this week?…the settlement includes $28.5 million in refunds for customers who were ripped off for excessive charges between 2002 and mid-2006 for driver licenses, vehicle registrations and other services?… It also includes $33.6 million that the agency began returning to customers last year for transactions from 2006 to 2014?… with previous settlements and refunds, the BMV has now admitted to charging Hoosier drivers more than $115 million in higher-than-allowed taxes and fees during the past 15 years?…this is SNEGAL running wild in Indianapolis in a big way?. IS IT TRUE after nine years in a Nevada prison former NFL and University of Southern California football star O J Simpson is going to be back on the streets?…Simpson was famous most of his life due to his football talent and later on for being aquitted of murdering his ex-wife and her boyfriend in a posh West LA neighborhood?…most everyone thought OJ did it, except for the 12 people on the jury?…we guess that we need to start confining our morning drinks to coffee, water, or tomato juice, because OJ will kill you? Todays READERS POLL question is: Do you feel that the city should add an additional tax on downtown businesses to encourage development?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected]’S FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare  IS IT TRUE it’s alleged that a proposed new TIF tax for downtown Evansville and surrounding property owners are being proposed by a hand picked committee? …that downtown business owners and surrounding residential property owners were mailed a petition that ask them if they supported a proposed new TIF tax for that area? …that the petition participates were ask to answer either yes or no to the survey question? …If the majority voted “yes” the Evansville City Council is expected to rubber stamp it?   …”the word” in the street is that the downtown businesses owners are pushing it so it will probably pass? IS IT TRUE Landa Clause is hoping to give away in downtown Evansville in exchange for some residential development?…what the City of Evansville Department of Metropolitan Development is hoping to see are three story high buildings with 170 or so apartments that will cost between $30 Million and $50 Million in exchange for some free land?…if the Old Safe House is any metric for what an apartment costs it will take $50 Million just to build 170 apartments with no money left for anything else on the Christmas list?…there was an architect/developer named Jim who was sporting about with renderings for such a place integrated into the old Greyhound Bus Station roughly 9 years ago?…land for development can be a decent deal if the City of Evansville keeps their grimy fingers out of the developer’s way of doing things?…any decent developer can likely build some really nice apartments for less than half of what the City spent fixing up the apartments in the Old Safe House and should be allowed to do so?…more apartments is better when one is trying to attract basic things like groceries. pharmacy and a gas station to a downtown?last_img read more

imjirooxa

The Great Egg Hunt is on O.C. Boardwalk

first_imgGet ready for a new way to celebrate Easter with a different take on “The Great Egg Hunt” on the Ocean City Boardwalk.On Saturday, March 27 and Saturday, April 3, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. children infant to seven years old can hunt for eggs at Boardwalk shops and restaurants.Traditionally, the egg hunt has been held on the beach, with thousands of stuffed multi-colored plastic eggs filled with candies, toys and other goodies.Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, due to gathering restrictions, the city canceled the hunt for the last two years.That was when the Boardwalk Merchants Association members thought of a new way for children and their families to enjoy the day, explained Wes Kazmarck, president of the BMA.“The stores will have the eggs and kids can just come into the stores and pick them up,” he said. “It is kind of like hunting for eggs and they get to go to different stores for them. We felt this was the best way to do it this year.”Refer to the attached flyer for the stores that are participating in the egg hunt. Ocean City’s Boardwalk will be the place for “The Great Egg Hunt.” last_img read more

imjirooxa

FWP Matthews

first_imgIndependent flour mill FWP Matthews (Chipping Norton, Oxon) offers a Cotswold Organic Crunch flour, containing organic wheat flour, organic malted wheat flakes and organic malted wheat. The firm’s range includes four organic white flours, three organic brown flours, three organic French flours and three other organic cereal flours.last_img

imjirooxa

Lightbody performance is ’ahead of expectations’

first_imgFinsbury Food Group, which acquired Lightbody in February, will pay the vendors the maximum deferred consideration payment of £8.7m, as a result of an “excellent performance”.Lightbody is “ahead of expectations”, with the Thorntons’ branded cake range “particularly positive”, according to a trading update released last week.Chief executive, Dave Brooks, told British Baker that as part of the post-acquisition plan, the integration of Coatbridge-based California Cakes into the Lightbody of Hamilton site is due to start this month.Brooks said trading has “remained strong in all subsidiaries” of the group, including its premium and celebration cakes, low-fat slices and speciality, organic and gluten-free breads.Sales for Memory Lane Cakes have grown by 10% year-on-year, with bread bakery Nicholas and Harris up 17%. The turnover of the Scottish cake businesses of California Cakes and Campbells Cakes are up a combined 28% for the 32 weeks to June 2007.United Central Bakeries, which was severely damaged by fire in October 2006, is now close to returning to full production and lines for potato scones and yum yums were now complete.last_img read more

imjirooxa

Press release: New guarantee on death in service benefits for frontline health and care staff during pandemic

first_img For the NHS and public health, frontline staff employed by: The families of health and care workers on the frontline in England will benefit from a new life assurance scheme during the pandemic, developed after discussions with health and social care unions.The scheme recognises the increased risk faced by staff during the crisis and will cover coronavirus related deaths of workers in frontline health and adult and children’s social care roles during the outbreak. It will cover staff who provide hands-on personal care for people who have contracted coronavirus or work in health or care settings where the virus is present. Information on how to make a claim can be found on the NHS Business Services Authority website. For adult and children’s social care: all employees of local authorities, care home providers for children and adults, domiciliary care home providers and directly employed carers including personal assistants where some of the funding is public for the care of the service users. The scheme will cover frontline staff in England, but the devolved administrations will receive funding through the Barnett formula. Wales is implementing the same scheme and arrangements are being considered in Scotland and Northern Ireland. The scheme is time-limited, providing cover for the duration of the pandemic. This is measured as the period for which the NHS workforce provisions in the Coronavirus Act 2020 are in force (which took effect on 25 March) but claims for deaths occurring before this will be considered. At the conclusion of the emergency response, the Secretary of State will give notice to close the scheme. The coverage of the scheme is broadly drawn across health and care sector employers given the variety of roles and locations, but eligibility is work-related.center_img New life assurance scheme launched for eligible frontline health and care workers during the coronavirus pandemic Families of eligible workers who die from coronavirus in the course of their frontline essential work will receive a £60,000 payment Scheme will cover frontline NHS staff and social care workers in England Funding will also be provided to devolved administrations to support similar schemes in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland statutory NHS bodies: Trusts, Special Health Authorities, Clinical Commissioning Groups and NHS England/Improvement GP and dental practices (including GP or dental contractors and GP locums) Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) arm’s length bodies, including Public Health England wider non-NHS organisations who provide NHS-funded services and functions including commissioned services and outsourced services organisations delivering public health grant funded services Bereaved family members will receive a £60,000 lump sum worth roughly twice the average pensionable pay for NHS staff, with the cost met by the government.This will cover full, part-time or locum NHS and public health workers, including GPs, dentists, retired staff and second and final year students taking up paid frontline roles.Within social care, the scheme will cover employees of publicly funded care homes, home care, directly employed carers including personal assistants and frontline child and family social workers.The scheme is aimed at those who die from coronavirus during the course of their essential and lifesaving work. This includes those providing direct care as well as cleaners and porters who continue to carry out vital duties in these care environments.Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:“Nothing can make up for the tragic loss of a loved one during this pandemic. We owe a huge debt to those who die in service to our nation and are doing everything we can to protect them.“Financial worries should be the last thing on the minds of their families so in recognition of these unprecedented circumstances we are expanding financial protection to NHS and social care workers delivering publicly funded care on the frontline.“We will continue to strive night and day to provide them with the support and protection they need and deserve to keep them safe as they work tirelessly to save lives.”Employers will be asked to initiate claims on behalf of the individual’s families and claims will be verified and processed by the NHS Business Services Authority, who will work with employers to ensure claims are handled swiftly and sensitively.Notes to editorslast_img read more

imjirooxa

‘Integrating oral health and primary care can really help the health of this nation and of the world’

first_imgGazette: So, you took courses at the Medical School for your dental degree and later looped back to HMS for your M.D. Why?Donoff: When I was a senior, my wife and I discussed whether I should go get my M.D. before pursuing oral and maxillofacial surgery, but Harvard didn’t allow transfers anymore. The Medical School was very strict about closing any back doors in. But Walter Guralnick, the head of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, along with the Medical School and Gerry Austen at Mass. General Hospital, devised a program that would allow dental graduates from Harvard to return to the Medical School as part of the program at the MGH in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The reason for that is, with the M.D., you could do general surgery at a more appropriate level of experience. At that time, the specialty was expanding and you did just a three- or four-month rotation in general surgery. The M.D. program was at least one year, sometimes two. We had great success with that program and, in 1986, with the help of Dan Federman, we extended it to graduates of dental schools other than Harvard. What started as one program here in 1971 is now about 50 around the country. I think it’s really changed the specialty, because it’s practiced by dual-degree people elected to the American College of Surgeons. It really has enhanced the whole specialty.Gazette: Do you think that becoming an oral and maxillofacial surgeon enhanced your view that medicine and dentistry are more than just sister disciplines?Donoff: I think partly that’s it, but the other thing that’s important is having residency training. Almost all of our students do some kind of residency or graduate work, which is something that I believe in.Gazette: You were saying earlier that you always wanted a career that combined practice, research, and teaching. How did that come about?Donoff: I was a resident, and then I worked as a research fellow — Walter Guralnick said I needed to get some good research, and I did. I worked with Hermes Grillo, who was a thoracic surgeon, and Jack Burke, who was a physician. And I studied wound healing for about 20 years. I had a laboratory at the Shriners Burn Institute at the MGH.Gazette: Was burn repair connected to dentistry?Donoff: No, it was just wound healing. We did a lot of wound healing with artificial skins and things of that nature.Gazette: Then your research moved to bone graft repair or bone graft survival?Donoff: I cared for a lot of head and neck cancer patients and in those days, the radiation methods were not kind to bone. There were conditions that led to loss of bone and bone grafts. I did the first of what’s called a microvascular bone graft, where we’d hook up the blood vessels from the bone graft to the patient so that it could survive radiation. Since I was doing microsurgery, I began repairing injured nerves, trigeminal nerves in particular, that were damaged either by trauma or by surgery, unfortunately. And I still see some of those patients.Gazette: How has your thinking evolved about dental education and is that reflected in the curriculum here?Donoff: A lot of dental schools are very heavy on procedures. This School was always different because of its alignment with the Medical School. When I was still a student, I remember people coming to observe the educational system here. The University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine was modeled after this School in terms of spending the first two years with the medical students and then moving to the Dental School. Reidar Sognnaes, who was a faculty member here in the ’60s, started the dental school at UCLA in Los Angeles, same kind of thing. Physicians learn very little about the mouth. It’s hard to believe, because there are specialties for the eye, for dermatology. But here, we’ve always emphasized the science and we benefited from being together with the basic scientists, the teachers at the Medical School. There was a report in 1926, called the Gies Report, that said dentistry needs to stay integrated with medicine — separate, but integrated. I’m a great believer in that kind of education.Gazette: That’s been your message for decades, right? Are you being heard?Donoff: I think so. I’ve been invited to the Harkin Institute in Iowa to speak on integration of oral health into primary care. And I’ve written on it, so I think I’m being heard.,Gazette: If it comes to fruition — and it seems, at best, a slow process — what would it look like in 20, 30 years?Donoff: What we’re trying to do here and at other medical schools is to create a group of dually qualified individuals who’ve had an experience in dental school and who follow that with a combination of oral health residency and primary care residency, because then they’ll think not just of dentistry, but of oral health. I used to teach physical diagnosis to Harvard medical students at Mass. General on the surgical service. And they’d do their patients and they’d do their writeups, and they’d write HEENT — the head, ears, eyes, nose, and throat. And then they’d write PERRLA: pupils equal round — blah, blah, blah. Then: pharynx benign — they went right past the mouth. That led to us giving sessions on the mouth for the medical students rotating at Mass. General and the Brigham. Now, we give a full day to the combined medical and dental class in the first year. But it clearly isn’t enough. The mission of this School for the past five years is to educate global leaders in research, teaching, and practice, and to break down the barriers between medicine and dentistry. That’s not the case for all dental schools. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, some very fine dental schools closed — Wash. U. in St. Louis, Georgetown in D.C., Northwestern in Chicago. Since then there has been a growth of dental schools associated with osteopathic schools, but they’re heavy on the procedures. Oral health suffers from being silo-ized, but the profession likes that. The profession stayed out of Medicare. The two most common questions I get: “Why do dental implants cost so much?” And, “My husband just turned 65, and do you know there are no dental benefits in Medicare?” The American Dental Association just came out against dental benefits, while the AMA supports it.Gazette: You’ve described it as kind of a cottage industry. Is that position because of that business model?Donoff: And maintaining fee-for-service.Gazette: To backtrack to what things might look like 30 years from now: Would you go to your primary care doc, except that doc would also have training in dentistry and do soup to nuts — the mouth and everything else? Or would you have dentists who knew some primary care working maybe in practice with a primary care doc?Donoff: I think it would work both ways. But I think dentists could really change and enhance their scope if they wanted to and they weren’t restricted by dental practice acts. They can’t even order a hemoglobin A1C if they think the patient might be diabetic. So I think one of the solutions and what we’re trying to do is to develop a cadre of leaders — young people who are dually trained and educated in the right way who could lead multidisciplinary teams. And one of the things we’re trying to do here with the Medical School Center for Primary Care is establish a so-called “practice of the future” that would be a teaching practice for medical and dental students, maybe pharmacy students all together — because pharmacy’s changed their game. They don’t just dispense pills anymore. It’s a changing scene. There’s a lot said about interprofessional education, but I think interprofessional practice is the important part.Gazette: How big a hurdle is resistance within the industry?Donoff: Big.Gazette: And is that the reason it hasn’t happened yet?Donoff: I think that’s a big part. I sit on the American Dental Association Committee on Dental Education and Licensure. I’ve got another year and a half to go. And they’ve been spending a lot of time moving away from this clinical-based licensing exam, where students have to bring in patients and do particular procedures. They could fail because they don’t perform well on one day, even though they did great in dental school. I think the problem with that is we wanted to develop something called an OSCE, Objective Structured Clinical Examination, which Canada has used for years very successfully. We developed this whole thing, with the American Dental Association in it, dental educators, the Student Dental Association — and then someone raised their hand and said, “But how are we going to test their hand skills?” The status quo is hard to break. [Ronald] Heifetz’s book on leadership says there are two kind of transformation: technical and adaptive. Technical transformations are easy — you change a little rule. Adaptive ones are tough. Adaptive always means a loss of something for somebody, and I think that’s what the dental profession is worried about.Gazette: Let’s talk about being dean.Donoff: Great job.Gazette: You have 28 years — longest-serving dean here. What’s been the biggest challenge?Donoff: We’re part of the Faculty of Medicine, but in my 28 years, we’ve established quite a bit of independence. I think it’s important to have that independence but maintain the relationship with the Medical School. Accepting the best students, finding the best faculty, being authentic, having the right temperament, all these have been very important.Gazette: What part of dentistry has made the greatest advance over the course of your career?Donoff: Implantology is tremendously different. It was only in the ’70s that [Swedish physician Per-Ingvar] Brånemark devised the implant. This has led to all sorts of treatment options and changes in curriculum. The implants are very successful, though there are still some problems with them. But it was good for doctors, so it succeeded.,Gazette: Good for doctors in what way?Donoff: Atul Gawande had a piece in The New Yorker several years ago called “Slow Ideas.” He talked about why the introduction of ether anesthesia in 1846 at Mass. General caught on: The surgeons loved it. The information about it traveled faster than if there had been an Internet around. But when [Joseph] Lister introduced the concepts of asepsis and sterilization, it was very, very slow for people to adopt. That’s because the former was good for the doctors, and the second was a chore for the doctors.Gazette: With ether, more people will get surgery and surgery will be easier, while for the second one, doctors have to spend more time and be more careful.Donoff: Exactly. I think implants are the same way.Gazette: Do you remember your first patient?Donoff: My first patient here in the Dental School: I made him a denture. When he came back in for one of his checkups, something wasn’t right with the denture. So I asked, “Did you drop them?” He said, no, there were a couple of sore spots, so he put them in the oven to heat them up and see if he could get it to fit better. I had to redo the denture. I’ve had some great patients whom I’ve stayed very close with over the years. I saw a woman two weeks ago, I put a bone graft and a bone plate in 33 years ago. It broke after 33 years.Gazette: After 33 years? So you’ll be fixing her — or did?Donoff: I did.Gazette: What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Is there a particular field or particular advance that you think is going to be a big deal?Donoff: I think integrating oral health and primary care can really help the health of this nation and of the world. I think people in underdeveloped areas who have toothaches and walk miles to a health center should be able to get their vaccinations, too. But unless we develop this group of leaders with dual degrees to push integration and educate medical students, we’re not going to succeed.Gazette: So you’re saying that the situation here in the developed world is a bit different from the developing world. Here it is how you devise a system that is most efficient, has best practices, and is best for the patient. Whereas in the developing world, there may be one doctor. And if that doctor doesn’t have oral health training, the patients could be out of luck.Donoff: The silo-ization of dentistry occurs even in the University. It has to be at least eight years ago, the University had a global health program. And I said, “There’s no oral health in this.” So I got together [former Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Dean] Julio Frenk, a couple of researchers, a couple of people from the Pan-American Health Organization, and we sat down and started a dental global health program, which has been great.Gazette: What was the hardest part of your career?Donoff: Hardest part? Wow, that’s a tough question. It wasn’t easy to decide to take the dean’s job. I really had a great job here and at Mass. General as department head (of maxillofacial surgery).Gazette: What was the deciding factor?Donoff: The deciding factor is I thought that someone should lead this School who had gone through its educational system.Gazette: What would you tell students who look at your career and wonder how they can be successful in today’s environment?Donoff:  I don’t know if there’s a formula, but I do think that an academic setting puts one in a position to make change and transformation. It’s very hard to do that through leadership in organizations like the American Dental Association. My favorite quote is from Louis Menand, who wrote a book, “Marketplace of Ideas.” He says — I’m paraphrasing — real transformation does not occur because of the discoveries that are made, but because of how the people who will make the discoveries are educated. That’s why I think these kinds of programs are important. I think important changes to health care in general — and oral health specifically — can best be accomplished through academic institutions. Life stories from Paul Farmer, Drew Faust, Howard Gardner, Annette Gordon-Reed, Martin Karplus, Toshiko Mori, Steven Pinker, E.O. Wilson, and many more, in the Experience series.The University’s longest-serving current dean, Harvard School of Dental Medicine’s Bruce Donoff, will step down in January after 28 years in the post and return to the School’s faculty. Donoff, the Walter C. Guralnick Distinguished Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, guided the School through various changes, championed reforms to dental education, and advocated a closer relationship between dentistry and primary medical care — he earned both his D.M.D. in 1967 and M.D. in 1973 at Harvard. Donoff, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon who has conducted research on wound healing, bone grafts, oral cancer, and nerve repair, sat down with the Gazette recently to share his experiences in leadership and his hopes for dentistry’s future. A symposium and reception at the School will honor his service on Dec. 10.ExperienceBruce DonoffGazette:  Why don’t we start at the beginning. You grew up in New York?Donoff:  I grew up in Brooklyn. I’m an only child. My mother was a schoolteacher, and my father was a manager at a printing company in Manhattan. He did not go to college, but he was very well-read. He could carry on a conversation with anybody. I grew up on the third floor of an apartment building and had my mother’s sister and two cousins, including my cousin Harvey — whom I went to school with — on the second floor. Brooklyn was a great place to grow up, because you interacted with all different kinds of people.Gazette:  What were the neighborhoods like? Did they welcome each other or was there a “stay on your own side of the street” aspect?Donoff:  They were welcoming. I lived at Troy and Lenox, and went to Erasmus Hall High School — Barbra Streisand and Bobby Fischer were in my homeroom for four years. But if I lived on the other side of Lenox Road, I would have gone to Wingate High School. And if I lived one block away, I would have gone to Tilden High School.Gazette:  Barbra Streisand was in your homeroom?Donoff:  She was.Gazette:  How well did you know her?Donoff:  I knew her to say hello. One time she was up here at the Kennedy School for something. I wanted to see her but had to go through about six secretaries to reach her.Gazette: How did dentistry come into the picture?Donoff:  I was always interested in science. I went to Brooklyn College, where I paid $28.50 a semester for tuition and had a state scholarship every semester. Brooklyn College was a great experience. That’s where I met my wife. I lived at home and joined a fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Pi, which provided a social outlet. I was a chemistry major, although I loved history. I started doing research with one of my biochem professors on active sites of enzymes, and I was thrilled to do history term papers that took me to the main branch of the New York Public Library. I loved going to the main library, but the other reason for going is the last automat in New York was down the street. Do you know what an automat was.Gazette:  I don’t.Donoff:  Horn & Hardart automats were a kind of cafeteria where you put nickels into slots and you got your food out. It was a great concept, though it faded and never got resurrected.Gazette:  What’s your wife’s name?Donoff:  My wife’s name is Mady. She was a speech and theater major and did a lot of costume design. I used to tutor her in physics and chemistry, that’s how we met. She’s a great lady. We got married in December of my second year here in Dental School. I always joke she taught so she could keep me in the style to which I was accustomed. She wound up getting a job in Malden, and we lived right up here by Brigham Circle. She took two trains to get to Malden and made some good friends. She is an extraordinary person. She gives her time to everyone.Gazette:  How important has your marriage been to your career and your life?Donoff:  Fabulous. She’s a common-sense person and a great adviser and always supportive. And there were a few times when there were serious decisions to be made. Whether to go back to Medical School after Dental School was one. Taking this deanship was another. She was a guidance counselor in the Brookline schools for about 30 years, retired 10 years ago, served on more boards than humanly possible. And now is president of our temple, a big one — 1,360 families — including the president of our University.Gazette:  How did you go from studying chemistry in college to coming up here for dental school?Donoff:  That’s a great question. I was also considering medical school, but I wanted to combine teaching, research, and practice. I met the dean of students here at the Dental School, Howard Oaks, and he convinced me that I could do all of this easier through Harvard School of Dental Medicine. I believed him. He was a very persuasive fellow. We came up here — there were two of us from Brooklyn College who went to Dental School and three who went to the Medical School that year.Gazette: Tell me about your dental education. How different was it from what a student gets here now?Donoff: Well, the Harvard Dental School was the first dental school associated with a university and its medical school. In fact, the whole profession might be different if it had been the very first dental school — I’m very passionate about medical/dental integration. My education at that time was quite different, though philosophically the same. We took every single Medical School course. I took tropical medicine and even took medical boards at the end of my second year, before we came to the Dental School. Now, it’s 14 months together [with the medical students] and, of course, the learning pedagogy is different. But it was a great education. David Weisberger chaired oral surgery and oral medicine at Mass. General and was the chairman of the department here. Weisberger was a very talented teacher. His class was a highlight of Dental School for many. He’d ask one member of the class to go to a cabinet where he had stored all these lantern slides, and he say, “Pick a set.” These were slides of patients he’d seen — and they were unbelievable cases. We’d spend the next hour, hour and a half discussing the case. Amazing experience. In those days, drug companies could give you black bags — I still have my black bag in my closet — and there was a little red book, “How to Take a History and Do a Physical Exam.” I was assigned and went off to see my first patient at the Brigham. Now, there’s a lot of preparation. In 1986, I instituted — along with the Medical School — “Introduction to Medicine,” in which first-year students learn to take a history and do a physical exam. Now it’s entirely different. “I was also considering medical school, but I wanted to combine teaching, research, and practice. I met the dean of students here at the Dental School, Howard Oaks, and he convinced me that I could do all of this easier through Harvard School of Dental Medicine.”last_img read more

imjirooxa

Odds & Ends: Witchy Meryl Streep Gets a Nom, Jeremy Jordan Has Magic to Do & More

first_img Sarah Paulson Trades Second Head for J.D. After four seasons of getting freaky, stage and screen star Sarah Paulson with team up with Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk once again for their new FX anthology series, American Crime, Deadline reports. As previously announced, the first season will cover the O.J. Simpson trial. Paulson will take on the role of head prosecutor Marcia Clark. Oscar winner Cuba Gooding Jr. has been tapped to play Simpson. Streep & Stage Faves Nab SAG Noms The nominations for the 21st annual Screen Actors Guild Awards were announced on December 10. In addition to Into the Woods’ witchy Meryl Streep being nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role, a whole host of stage names received nods. The nominees include Cabaret star Emma Stone for Birdman, Benedict Cumberbatch for The Imitation Game and Sherlock: His Last Vow, Uzo Aduba for Orange is the New Black and the Gyllenhaal siblings, Maggie (currently on Broadway) and Jake (heading here this spring), for The Honorable Woman and Nightcrawler, respectively. Julia Roberts and Mark Ruffalo were nominated for the HBO adaptation of The Normal Heart. Tony winners to receive recognition included Eddie Redmayne for The Theory of Everything, Maggie Smith for Downton Abbey, Frances McDormand for Olive Kitteridge, Ellen Burstyn for Flowers in the Attic and Cicely Tyson The Trip to Bountiful. The Broadway-centric flick Birdman was also nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Jeremy Jordan Has the Magic Touch Tony nominee and Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner Jeremy Jordan, Mamma Mia! star Judy McLane, The Last Ship’s Fred Applegate and Tony nominees Kerry Butler, Brad Oscar and Douglas Sills will headline a reading of Presto Change-O. The new musical follows three generations of illusionists (like those guys) and the woman who loves all of them. The show features music by Joel Waggoner and a book and lyrics by Eric Price. Marc Bruni will direct the reading, presented by Barrington Stage Company, on December 19 at the Manhattan Theatre Club.center_img View Comments Prince William, Duke of Cambridge/West End Producer? The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge wrapped up their New York tour on Tuesday, but not before giving a Brooklyn-based performer a royal offer. During William and Kate’s visit to The Door, a youth center in lower Manhattan, 22-year-old Steven Prescod performed selections from his one-man show Brooklyn Boy, including spoken word pieces and dance personifying his early life. According to The Daily Mail, Prince William was so moved that he gave Prescod his number and offered to help bring the show to the West End. Excuse us, Prince William, did you by chance give that number to our News Editor as well? We have a few show ideas we would love to pitch you.last_img read more

imjirooxa

Hamilton’s Anthony Ramos on His Unabashed Love for Boy Bands & Spice Girls Secret

first_imgAnthony Ramos photographed by Caitlin McNaney at Rudy’s Bar & Grill in NYC. Hamilton Related Shows Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:11Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:11 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. View Comments Age: 24Hometown: Bushwick, BrooklynCurrent Role: Making his Broadway debut in two pivotal parts in the mega-hit musical Hamilton—John Laurens, the soldier and statesman who memorably introduces himself with the unquenchable: “Two pints o’ Sam Adams, but I’m workin’ on three!” and Philip Hamilton, son of the title character. Stage and Screen Cred: Ramos has appeared in a national tour of Damn Yankees as well as regional productions of In the Heights (which is also by Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda) and Grease. His screen roles include Younger and the feature film White Girl. from $149.00 Star Files Anthony Ramoslast_img read more

imjirooxa

3 signs there’s a black hole in your IT strategy

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Black holes are some of the strongest and most mysterious objects in the universe. Albert Einstein was the first to theorize of their existence in 1916. So why could he only theorize? Because you can’t actually see a black hole – you can only tell it’s there by observing what goes on around it.According to NASA, you can identify that a black hole is there by three signs:Gravitational pull – You can see things moving toward and circling around one specific area.Observing things falling into that area – You lose sight of them and they never come back out.If you get too close, you will experience an event horizon – Where time will appear to stand still.Identifying black holesMany organizations have black holes in their IT strategies when it comes to how employees are sharing critical business information with people outside their four walls. But how can you tell if you have a file-sharing black hole if you can’t see it? Let’s use the same three signs suggested by NASA: continue reading »last_img read more

Recent Comments