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London Welsh players for sale…..on eBay

Taione won 18 caps for Tonga in an international career spanning nine years and included the 1999 and 2007 Rugby World Cups. His former clubs include Newcastle Falcons, Sale Sharks, Harlequins, Racing Metro 92, Sanyo Wild Knights and Natal Sharks.In 2009 he appeared in Clint Eastwood’s film Invictus about South Africa’s 1995 Rugby World Cup triumph, alongside Matt Damon and Morgan Freeman. He joined London Welsh in 2010.Jackson arrived at London Welsh this summer from Championship rivals Doncaster Knights, where he made 24 appearances last season, scoring three tries, to help the club to a sixth place finish and reach the promotion play-offs.Jackson came through the youth ranks at Bath and represented England at U18s, and was part of the side that won the Four Nations in 2006. He also led his country at U16 level. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Check out Epi Taione on Ebay Check out Ed Jackson on Ebay Epi TaioneLondon Welsh are offering its supporters a unique opportunity to win dinner or a round of golf with Epi Taione or Ed Jackson, simply by bidding on eBay.Normally people buy laptops, used cars, mp3 players and items for the home on eBay, but the Exiles have come up with an innovative auction offer – bidders can buy the sponsorship of a professional rugby player, to include either dinner or a round of golf with their hero, if they are the highest bidder.The standard eBay listing says ‘The item may have some signs of cosmetic wear, but it is fully operational and functions as intended’ but that’s to be expected for a rugby player!Tongan star Taione and talented forward Jackson are both available to bid on just by click following the below link, so let’s see who gets the highest bid!Tonga international Taione, who famously dyed his hair green for sponsor Paddy Power during 2007 Rugby World Cup, and Jackson will be available to purchase until September 16.“If the bidding doesn’t go well maybe I’ll buy myself,” said Taione. “It’s an exciting project and I’ll make sure friends and family will help out so we achieve our goal. Yes, it’s good fun, but the real story behind this is that it’s tough in the current economic climate to try and find sponsorship. However, we are prepared to explore anyway to get London Welsh back where it should be.” read more

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Reading Camp takes literacy to the world

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 25, 2012 at 10:47 pm Becky,We were blessed to have you and the whole crew from the Diocese of Western Michigan. It is enervating to be sharing in mission and ministry with so many from across The Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion.Thanks be to God!Allison DuvallExecutive Director, Reading CampEpiscopal Diocese of Lexington Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Africa, Allison Duvall says: Comments (4) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Zona Tounsley says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET August 23, 2012 at 7:19 pm Thank you for featuring the Diocese of Lexington’s very successful Reading Camp program. A 2009 United Thank Offering Companion Diocese grant of $22,900.00 was awarded to the Diocese of Lexington to fund the development of a training center in Grahamstown, South Africa, with the purpose of expaning the Reading Camp program as part of a greater effort to meet educational needs of the poor throughout the Anglican Church in South Africa. Obviously this article shows these grant funds were well used and laid the foundation for this expansion into other areas of South Africa. As a past member of the UTO Board, I say a heartfelt thank you to all of you who drop coins and dollars into your little Blue Box to make programs like this not only possible but very successful! Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Allison Duvall says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Children Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 23, 2012 at 9:31 pm Dear Zona,Thank you for your kind words and your support of the Reading Camp ministry. The 2009 UTO Grant did sow the seeds for some broad and deep thinking about how the Reading Camp ministry could spread in other parts of the world, build up relationships and build the Kingdom across the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.A huge thank you to Matthew Davies for catching the vision and sharing Reading Camp with the world through ENS!Peace,Allison DuvallExecutive DirectorReading Camp – Episcopal Diocese of Lexington The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Matthew DaviesPosted Aug 23, 2012 Becky Searles says: Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Cameroonian teacher Evelyn Andom volunteers this summer at Reading Camp’s pilot program in Tiko. Photo/Carolyn Hockey[Episcopal News Service] About one billion people read the world in a different way. According to United Nations statistics, they are 17 percent of the global population aged 15 years and above who are saddled with illiteracy, unable to read this article.For the leaders and volunteers of Reading Camp, an Episcopal Diocese of Lexington ministry that’s gone global, illiteracy – defined by the U.N. as the inability to read and write a simple message in any language – is not an option. Educating and empowering the next generation, instilling self-confidence and creating new opportunities are among the program’s main objectives.The Rev. Joseph Ngijoe and his wife Clemence from the Anglican Church in Cameroon had dreamed of building an international partnership to help children who are struggling to read and write in the West African country, where 1 in 4 people, out of a population of 20 million, are illiterate.Friendships forged in 2009 – while studying at Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California – paved the way for the Ngijoes’ dream to become reality. Reading Camp Cameroon was born in mid-June this year with a week-long pilot program held in Tiko, bringing together Episcopal Church ambassadors from the United States and a team of Cameroonian teachers, all volunteers.Clemence Ngijoe described the program as a creative and vital tool to breaking the cycle of poverty and ignorance.“We know that ignorance is a blockade to social development and that reading is a foundation for knowledge. A person who does not read is like a blind person and is limited in all aspects of life,” she told ENS. “Reading shares love, care and blessings in the family, at school, in the community and in the world. It is a ministry of God’s love, compassion and self-discovery.”Reading Camp, Ngijoe noted, also is integral to fulfilling the second Millennium Development Goal of achieving universal primary education.“A well-educated child will contribute immensely to society,” she said. “Reading Camp assists children not only to learn but also to develop self-confidence.”About 45 children, aged 8-11, arrive for another day at Reading Camp Cameroon. Photo/Petero SabuneThe three lay ambassadors, from the dioceses of Atlanta, Lexington and Ohio, joined the Ngijoes and more than 20 local teachers in delivering the program to about 45 campers, mostly aged 8-11, in Cameroon.Joanne Ratliff, a senior lecturer in language and literacy at the University of Georgia, described it as one of the most spiritual experiences of her life.She said that the teachers and children who participated in the camp “were a blessing to me on a professional and personal level … The children brought joy to my soul showing their love of learning. All came with an open heart and an open mind.”In contrast to the United States, many Cameroonian schools have “up to four times as many students in classrooms with wooden benches, a chalkboard and chalk, and little else,” Ratliff explained. “The school building we worked in was described as a good school, but probably would have been condemned in the U.S.”Twenty-one teachers showed up every day for no pay during their school holiday, Ratliff said. “They worked with children all morning and then came and worked with me for another hour. I never heard a single complaint. In fact, their gratitude was overwhelming.”Beauty showed up every day with her book tucked under her arm. She wanted to read, but she was too young to join this year’s program. Maybe next year. Photo/Petero SabuneCarolyn Hockey, 19, from Cleveland, in the Diocese of Ohio, said that Reading Camp Cameroon was so successful that other children in the neighborhood “tried to sneak into camp, seeing how much fun everyone was having, and how much they were learning.”Hockey spent five years volunteering and counseling at camps in Lexington and helped to launch the first Reading Camp in the Diocese of Ohio, at her home parish of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Cleveland Heights. She said she feels “most connected with God” when she’s at Reading Camp.“It’s not just a literacy program. It’s about building the self-confidence that young people need, particularly those who are struggling with reading. Gaining the confidence to try is half the struggle of reading for a lot of children,” said Hockey, who is spending the summer in Cameroon before beginning to study political science and religious studies at the College of Wooster in Ohio.“Another beautiful thing about Reading Camp is that it enriches the lives of everyone involved,” she added.Allissa Ferguson, 25, agreed. “Doing Reading Camp gives me hope,” she said. “I have seen the transformation that happens in the children and it reminds me that God does move in the world. I have also felt that transformation in my own life. At first I didn’t realize how special it was, but now after several years I see that Reading Camp is like a ‘mountain top experience’ like those mentioned in the Bible.”Originally from Nashville, Tennessee, Ferguson began volunteering for Reading Camp while studying at the University of Kentucky in the Diocese of Lexington. She got involved in the university’s campus ministry, and joined the Episcopal Church in her freshman year.Ferguson said the experience “creates space for the Holy Spirit and empowers me to stay positive even when I am frustrated. The kids themselves are a huge inspiration for me. Their hard work shows me that what we do really works and that anything is possible.”One of the 45 children, aged 8-11, who attended Reading Camp Cameroon. Photo/Carolyn HockeyReading Camp, Ferguson said, also represents a new beginning. “We don’t just teach reading skills; we create a safe, loving space for [the children] to grow and then give them the tools to do it. It is about a transformation that they can carry with them for the rest of their lives.”Hockey described the Cameroonian teachers and camp volunteers as dreamers, noting that they are already talking about expanding the camp to include five different weeks next year.“If anyone can do it, it’s them. They are so driven,” Hockey said.The Rev. Petero Sabune, Africa partnerships officer for the Episcopal Church, visited Cameroon to see the Reading Camp program in action.“To see, hear and experience the joy of the team in Cameroon was amazing. It was nothing short of a miracle,” he said. “Watching children come and adults welcome them to read was what we all waited for each and every day. To read and be read to is heavenly. I imagine heaven is where you have all the books and all the time.”The journey that led to Reading Camp Cameroon began in 2002 when former Bishop of Lexington Stacy Sauls, now the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, “dreamed of a program that would bring together the resources of the diocese … to address some of the region’s most pressing problems: illiteracy, poverty, and the general malaise and hopelessness that accompany them,” Allison Duvall, executive director of Reading Camp, told ENS.According to a federal study published in 2009, an estimated 32 million adults — about one in seven — in the United States have such low literacy skills that they would be unable to understand the instructions on a pill bottle.Identifying a “below basic” level of literacy in third and fourth graders can help to halt or reverse those numbers.Reading Camp volunteers communicate with school systems, asking teachers to nominate struggling students who are at least one grade level behind in reading to attend the program, Duvall said.During camp, she said that each child receives more than 15 hours of personalized remedial literacy instruction in small groups or one-on-one with trained teachers and volunteers.In addition to bolstering their reading skills, the children “enjoy afternoon activities that are structured to build confidence, self-awareness, and develop strong characters, all the while incorporating life skills and interdisciplinary learning,” said Duvall. “Campers learn to swim, ride a horse, or rappel down a cliff face – and these successes transform their approach to learning to read.”By 2008, Reading Camps had been held at eight different sites in the Diocese of Lexington, as well as in Iowa, Ohio, Virginia, and South Africa.The South Africa program, launched in Grahamstown in 2007, is still going strong five years later and local leaders are talking about spreading Reading Camp to the other dioceses in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa.One of the most pressing problems, Duvall said, has been in creating a sustainable growth model, “which would assist others in starting their own Reading Camps without detracting from the funding or quality of programs in the Diocese of Lexington.”In response, the Reading Camp Network was established to support the expansion and growth of the ministry throughout the United States and the rest of the world, said Duvall.Churches and organizations that wish to start a literacy program based on the Reading Camp model can now join the network and access the training resources.Whether held in Lexington, Cleveland, South Africa or Cameroon, the Reading Camp volunteers describe the experience as being transformational for all participants, children and volunteers alike.Abbey Clough, a young adult volunteer at the Pine Mountain Reading Camp that was held in late July in Kentucky, said that it has been a vehicle for her own “vocational discernment … [It] sheds away some emotional brick walls that I put up.”She said that the children have opened up her heart and the volunteers have become like brothers and sisters.Clough, 19, a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Cleveland Heights, spoke about two former campers who now volunteer at Reading Camp as junior counselors. “They showed up not able to say the alphabet or write their own names four years ago,” she said. “Now they’re junior counselors who are no longer living with emotional brick walls. They were so closed off when they first came here. Now, they watch out for the other kids. [It’s] a concrete example of … the effect that Reading Camp has on people … Those two have melted the hearts of the people who have been on this staff for the last four years.  We are so invested in them.”Clough is one of the many young adult counselors who volunteer their time to Reading Camp every year, often paying their own way to join one of the programs.The Rev. Chris Arnold, rector of St. Mary’s Church in Middlesboro, Diocese of Lexington, and a first year volunteer at Pine Mountain Reading Camp, said that time and again, “Scripture shows God opening the eyes of people to better possibilities, brighter futures, the promised land and the Kingdom. Reading Camp reveals God’s method of helping people to discover new potentials and fresh delights.”Meanwhile, Cameroon’s Clemence Ngijoe is just grateful that the camp has built on its successes in the United States to broaden the program globally. She said she values deeply the friendships that have been built “within our communities and far away” through the program.“We now form a very large international family,” she said. “This has once more taught us about the notion of Ubuntu (an African concept meaning ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’) and oneness despite our cultural or geographical differences.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Tampa, FL August 24, 2012 at 4:26 pm I volunteered for reading camp, for the 1st time, this yr in Irvine, Kentucky . It was truly an awesome experience! To see the happiness on their faces when they finally would “get” something and know they COULD do it was great. I can’t wait till next summer to do it again, and in a couple yrs, hope to bring the concept back to western Michigan. Something like this program is needed everywhere!!!! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Reading Camp takes literacy to the world Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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New edition of fundraising handbook published

first_img The 6th edition of the Irish Fundraising Handbook has been published by Create, the national development agency for collaborative arts. The agency has been publishing the handbook, which provides information on sources of funding and other information, for nearly 10 years.The Irish Fundraising Handbook contains details on 700 grants, awards and other supports for charities and other voluntary organisations. The information includes private and public sources, including lists of contacts in local and national government. The book also provides ./guidance on fundraising practice, charity regulation and tax exemptions. However, much of the information on charity regulation may change with the introduction of new charity legislation next year. Advertisement The handbook has been produced with financial support from the Citizens Information Board and in association with Clann Credo (Social Investment Fund) and The Wheel. The handbook is available from Create for ‚€20, plus ‚€3 p+p.For information, contact [email protected] / Tel: 01- 4736600To download an Order Form visit www.create-ireland.ie New edition of fundraising handbook published Howard Lake | 23 October 2007 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Tagged with: Ireland About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Lucha contra el racismo de Trump y el militarismo de Clinton

first_imgLa gente de otros países está probablemente rascándose la cabeza preguntándose qué está pasando con la política en Estados Unidos.Hace apenas seis meses, parecía posible que un autoproclamado socialista podría ganar la nominación demócrata, algo inédito en la historia de EE.UU.Ahora bien, hay serias advertencias de que un fanfarrón, racista, misógino, multimillonario, anti-inmigrante podría ser elegido presidente y arrastre todo hacia a la derecha.La captura de los titulares en este momento es la consternación de los líderes del Partido Demócrata que muchos de los jóvenes políticamente activos que han participado en las luchas como La Lucha por $15, La Vida de los Negros Vale, los derechos de los inmigrantes, el movimiento ambiental, la campaña Bernie Sanders, el movimiento LGBTQ e incluso el movimiento de mujeres no voten por Hillary Clinton.Los políticos y voces establecimiento liberal como el New York Times están llevando a cabo una redada sin límites a conducir estos posibles votantes demócratas en el redil. Ellos están lamentando el hecho de que cuando Sanders haga las corridas electorales por Clinton, él logre atraer una décima parte de sus seguidores que él atraía.Su argumento, por supuesto, es que, si estos jóvenes progresistas no votan por Clinton, podrían ser considerados responsables de la victoria de Trump.El sistema bipartito funciona – para los ricosDesde hace más de dos siglos, el sistema político bipartito ideado por los primeros esclavistas, banqueros e industriales para manejar a este país ha sido muy eficaz en el mantenimiento de la regla de los pocos ricos, mientras capturan en el apoyo o al menos la aceptación de la muchos.En sus inicios el sistema servía a los intereses de los industriales y banqueros del Norte, al mismo tiempo que los propietarios de las plantaciones del sur – hasta que los dos sistemas chocaron en una gran guerra civil.Pero después de haber resuelto el problema entre el esclavista y el capitalista, la esclavitud frente a la esclavitud salarial, las dos partes revivieron su colaboración en interés de lucro con la traición de la Libertad para los Negros en 1876 y 1877, poniendo fin a la época de la Reconstrucción de corta duración.El sistema de dos partidos sobrevivió al desafío del movimiento populista hacia el final del siglo 19, así como las grandes luchas obreras de la Depresión. En todo ese tiempo, ambos partidos han mantenido guerras imperialistas sacrosanta, asegurándose de que el complejo militar-industrial-bancario es lo primero, incluso en tiempos de crisis presupuestarias.¿Qué pasa con la elección cuatrienal actual? ¿Qué hay de nuevo acerca de esto? Como siempre, presenta a un demócrata contra un republicano, aunque los candidatos proporcionan un contraste más llamativo que en las contiendas presidenciales anteriores.¿Moviéndose a la izquierda o la derecha?A medida que el estancamiento capitalista, que ha devastado muchas áreas, se prolonga, el sufrimiento generalizado que resulta está socavando el statu quo político.Pero la pregunta es: ¿Están los trabajadores de EE.UU. moviéndose hacia la izquierda o hacia la derecha? ¿Está Trump apelando a un nuevo movimiento de derecha? ¿O su campaña está recogiendo la mayor parte de los votos de aquellos que no están en movimiento, no organizados, pero parecen idolatrar a una superestrella de los medios de comunicación que promete que va a solucionar todo con sólo votar por él?Llamando constantemente a los partidarios de Trump “trabajadores blancos”, los grandes medios de comunicación pueden hacer que parezca que hay un cambio reaccionario en la clase obrera. ¿Pero cuando estos alguna vez han descrito a los muchos movimientos sociales progresistas en este país en términos de clase similares?Desde hace unos años, muchas, muchas personas han estado marchando, llegando a través de las redes sociales, que se reúnen multitudes instantáneas y otras formas inventivas de protesta. En su mayoría son jóvenes y muy francos, rompiendo todo tipo de barreras represivas. Se han enfrentado a policías y guardias de seguridad. Y la gran mayoría de ellos son de la clase trabajadora.La gente dinámica de color ha estado en el liderazgo de muchos de estos movimientos, y también hay muchos, muchos trabajadores blancos – con o sin trabajo – que con pasión odian el sistema y todas las formas de intolerancia que dividen a nuestra clase.Las calles pertenecen al puebloLas calles son del pueblo – no es sólo un eslogan. Los reaccionarios, los intolerantes, no están en las calles. A excepción de unos pocos acérrimos, que han sido reacios a expresar sus ideas retrógradas, de odio para el escrutinio público y la crítica. Pero Trump y los magnates de los medios reaccionarios les han dado una plataforma alta.Desde que Sanders cedió y dio su aprobación a Clinton, el movimiento que había mirado hacia él para un nuevo curso ha tenido que replantear los que se debe hacer a continuación. No van a Trump, obviamente. Pero no pueden tener mucha confianza en Clinton y el establecimiento Democrática, tampoco.Ellos saben que, después de ocho años de un gobierno demócrata, incluso uno encabezado por primera vez por un presidente afroamericano, poco ha cambiado en el manejo anti-trabajador, pro corporaciones y racistas del gobierno de EE.UU.Las cárceles todavía se rellenan con los pobres. Los policías todavía derriban a los negros desarmados, incluso a los niños.El super-ricos absorben una porción cada vez mayor de la riqueza, mientras que ciudades como Flint, Detroit, Oakland, Chicago, Baltimore y Cleveland, y muchas áreas rurales sufren niveles insoportables de desempleo, falta de vivienda y la decadencia.El complejo Pentágono-bancario-industrial continúa aplicando su experiencia en matar a la gente de todo el mundo – y valerse de millones de millones de dólares de impuestos del tesoro público en Washington.La crisis ambiental global continúa manteniéndose detrás de las ganancias de las empresas petroleras y químicas y los portafolios de Wall Street.Cualquiera que sea el candidato capitalista que obtenga más votos en esta elección, no va a cambiar todo esto – o eliminar los movimientos progresistas de este país.Lo que es crucial es que los movimientos deben mantenerse independiente del establecimiento capitalista y fiel a sus orígenes, tener confianza en su propia fuerza, y no convertirse en un apéndice de los “menos reaccionarios” de los dos partidos imperialistas.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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From Black Reconstruction to Black Lives Matter

first_imgLeiLani DowellI am currently a Ph.D. student at the City University of New York Graduate Center. In a class this semester called “Racial Capitalism,” I was given the opportunity to read W.E.B. Du Bois’ masterpiece, “Black Reconstruction in America.”My reading of that text couldn’t have come at a better time because it really provides a detailed exposition of the U.S. state’s role and its tactics aimed at preserving the capitalist economic system. It’s always been important to have such an understanding, but it’s so important now in the aftermath of the election of Donald Trump.Every single social interaction I have had since Tuesday [Nov. 8] with faculty members, fellow graduate students, the undergraduates I mentor, and my partner has involved trying to sort out the anger, fear, pain and confusion regarding Trump’s election. It’s imperative that we mobilize, organize and remain vigilant. But it’s also imperative that we help provide an understanding of the current situation that will at least get people through their days — and at best encourage people to fight.I want to talk about just one lesson we can glean from Du Bois. We can look at what happened in the current elections and, thanks to Du Bois, have a greater understanding of the two-party system and of our rightful role in relation to it. During the Civil War, it was the Democrats, and not the Republicans, who were the “conservatives” in U.S. politics. Yet President Abraham Lincoln, a Republican, and Vice President Andrew Johnson, a Democrat, ran for office and won the election on a unity ticket.Today Lincoln is celebrated. He is unfortunately misunderstood here and internationally as the president who “freed the slaves.” But the truth of the matter is that Lincoln had no interest in Black lives at all, and was, in fact, at the beginning of the war, intent on making clear that the war was not one of liberation for the millions of enslaved people in the South. Lincoln even ordered Union troops to return escaped enslaved people back to their “owners” at the beginning of the war.‘General strike’ pressured LincolnWhat changed Lincoln’s mind? In what Du Bois calls a “general strike,” droves upon droves of enslaved Black people began escaping from the plantations and arriving at Union encampments. The South, it was believed, had the advantage in the war because its white laborers were “freed up” to serve in the military. They were freed up because enslaved laborers would continue supplying food and supplies to the troops.So it truly was a strike when these enslaved people withheld their labor from the white slave owners. Moreover, once the Union generals got over their racist outlooks and attitudes toward these enslaved people — or, at least, put them aside in the interest of the war — they discovered that the enslaved, who had spent years of their lives, if not all their lives, in the same areas where the war was being waged, made excellent spies and saboteurs.Once the enslaved people came to the realization that they had turned the war into a war of liberation, they fought valiantly until the very end, even while facing Northern troops’ racism and discrimination. It wasn’t until enslaved people forced upon Lincoln the consciousness that this was, in fact, a war against slavery — and that the Union could not win it unless the Union emancipated them — that Lincoln changed his mind and delivered the Emancipation Proclamation.I raise this because it has some incisive lessons for us today. Looking at Lincoln helps us understand the opportunism under which U.S. capitalist politics are waged. Like then, the politicians of the two-party system have one goal in mind: the preservation of the capitalist system. Lincoln’s motivation in preserving the Union was to support burgeoning Northern industrial capitalism, which needed a large geographical market and did not want to compete with seceded Southern states for international markets, particularly the market for cotton in England.Similar to Lincoln, the “moderate” capitalist politicians of today — from Bernie Sanders to — and I’m not saying she’s this, but in relation to Trump — Hillary Clinton, will ignore the needs, desires and the very lives of Black people unless forced to recognize them. It should always be remembered that any support offered to Black communities and any pithy words uttered against police brutality — which were few and far between in this election — are done in the service of maintaining the capitalist system in the U.S. and worldwide.Black struggle central to all strugglesConcurrently, any words said or actions taken by these politicians should be understood as a reflection of the movement — and not of “democracy” in “America.” But Du Bois’ analysis of the Civil War reminds us also that the Black struggle has always been central — and will always be central — to any struggle in the U.S.There’s also a lesson about working-class unity. The mainstream media were quick to imply that it was white workers who voted for Trump — a vote which was, essentially, a referendum in support of racism, sexism and reaction. However, later statistics have shown that it was majority white voters with high incomes who voted for Trump. So we should categorically reject any analyses that say, “Oh, all the white workers are racist.”Nonetheless, Du Bois notes that it was precisely the failure of Black-white unity that led to the overthrow of Reconstruction. According to Du Bois, class unity “failed to work, because the theory of race was supplemented by a carefully planned and slowly evolved method, which drove … a wedge between the black and white workers.”Du Bois recognized that working-class unity could have resulted in a real dictatorship of labor in the U.S. He said that serious revolutionary potential was thwarted then by both the machinations of the Southern planters, seething from the destruction of their entire way of life, and the Northern industrialists, for whom a dictatorship of labor was precisely the last thing they wanted.In New York, it can be extremely trying to deal with the insensitive ways some white people are dealing with this election. This week has left me weary and made me want to stay inside my apartment. I have needed this conference and to be here with you all.However, if we want to win, if we want to overthrow this f—ked-up system and end all the everyday and spectacular violences it commits against our lives, we must continue to struggle for unity. And we must realize that any divisions are custom-made to preserve capitalism and imperialism.I want to thank you all for being here, and for all the organizing and love that has taken place since the election. Let’s carry on, and let’s win.Dowell will be facilitating an extended discussion on “Black Reconstruction in America” on Dec. 18 at the Solidarity Center in New York City. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Corn Planting Does Total Turnaround from 2012

Facebook Twitter Home News Feed Corn Planting Does Total Turnaround from 2012 SHARE Previous articleA More Farmer Friendly EPANext articleSeed Consultants 4/17/2013 Market Update with Gary Wilhelmi Andy Eubank SHARE Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Apr 16, 2013 Zero Indiana corn plantingWhat a difference a year makes for farmers who depend on the weather to do their work. This year USDA says statistically no Indiana corn is in the ground. Last year in mid April Indiana corn planting progress was at 21 percent and climbing daily. Some farmers like John Hussey in Tipton County were even further along.“For the first time in my life I planted a little bit of corn in March a year ago, and I planted quite a bit of corn the first week in April, and at this time a year ago we were half done. But last year was a very unusual year from spring all the way through fall.”Some Indiana fields are nowhere near ready for planting but Hussey’s fields have drained well and it wouldn’t take long after rains stop for him to get a start.“If the rain would shut off and we would get some warm weather, sunshine and some breeze, a couple to three days would do a lot. We would have some fields that, in three days, would be probably suitable for planting. I’m talking that Friday, Saturday period we would be going.”But forecasts for much of the state call for continued rain through Friday.Mid April is about the average time frame for Hussey to start planting so for now he doesn’t feel as though he is getting a late start.The Tipton County landscape is different this year so there will be new sites once he does get in those fields, windmills. The Wildcat Wind Farm came online the first of the year in Tipton and Madison Counties.USDA’s NASS crop progress report Monday showed just 2 percent of the corn planted in the 18 states comprising the regular updates. Illinois and Ohio reported 1 percent planted while Iowa joined the Hoosier state at zero planted. Corn Planting Does Total Turnaround from 2012 read more

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Next Christmas Leave Dry Oatmeal for the Reindeer

first_img Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Next Christmas Leave Dry Oatmeal for the Reindeer Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleNCGA Ethanol Committee Reviews Progress, Explores OpportunitiesNext articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubank SHARE ReindeerSo can reindeer really fly? Well if you ask a reindeer farmer that question you’ll hear, “Oh, yes reindeer can fly, but only on Christmas Eve because if anybody saw them flying where they shouldn’t, then they would try to capture them and keep them on for themselves.”Yvonne and Daryl Simon have been raising reindeer for 21 years on their farm in southern Minnesota. Daryl says they are now what you call reindeerologists.“Having and working with reindeer for so many years, you learn a lot but you never learn enough and there’s always something else that pops up so it’s just a funny term that we use to indicate that we have a little bit of knowledge about reindeer.”They raise reindeer to attend events with Santa or anything else between Thanksgiving and January.“The types of events that they go to are anywhere from a community library or community center or park, to parades. They’ve also been at Santa events like a village set up.”Yvonne adds if you want to be sure the reindeer will make it to your house on Christmas Eve, don’t leave out carrots. Give them dried oatmeal.“Well yeah, they’ll eat carrots but their favorite is dried oatmeal. And a lot of schools are putting together little packets of dried oatmeal with glitter. When you put it out on your front doorstep Christmas Eve, the glitter attracts the reindeer so they come down to eat the snack, and they really, really do like dried oatmeal. They’ll go almost anywhere as long as you have that for their treat.”Source: American Farm Bureau Next Christmas Leave Dry Oatmeal for the Reindeer By Andy Eubank – Dec 26, 2014 last_img read more

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Ag Secretary Proclaims This Grain Bin Safety Week

first_img By Andy Eubank – Feb 16, 2020 Ag Secretary Proclaims This Grain Bin Safety Week Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleJury Rules in Favor of Missouri Farmer in Dicamba Case Against BASF and BayerNext articleA Lot of Left Over Seed From Last Year’s Prevent Plant Acres Andy Eubank Grain-Bin-Safety-WeekU.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue has proclaimed this week, February 16-22, Grain Bin Safety Week to raise awareness of hazards and safe work practices so the number of accidents associated with grain handling and storage can be reduced. In 2018, there were 30 documented grain entrapment cases and half of those resulted in a fatality.Secretary Perdue has an online video with South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem, whose father was killed in an entrapment in 1994.“He was a cowboy and worked very hard,” she told Perdue. “At that time, it was March 10th, and the corn in the grain bin was getting out of condition because of fluctuating temperatures and he did something that he told us kids to never do. He climbed up into the grain bin to break up some chunks of the crust and that was the last time anybody in our family saw him.”Perdue knows all about the dangers of getting into a grain bin, having worked in grain handling many years ago. Governor Noem has been an advocate for increased grain bin safety efforts for years.“My hope Sonny is that some farmer will see this video and he’ll remember it more when he’s out there working and tired and it’s a late night, and he’ll stop and think for the sake of my kids, because it’s still the worst day of our lives, and everything dramatically changed that day. Our whole farming operation changed. We almost lost our family business because of it. I quit school and became the general manager. We got hit with death taxes and we almost lost our operation. But, I just hope that they pause for a second before they jump into that grain bin, and think this could be the difference between life and death and my family needs me.”Secretary Perdue added, “Tragedies like the one Governor Noem’s family experienced happen too frequently and call for greater action, which is why I have signed a proclamation naming February 16-22 Grain Bin Safety Week.”Noem’s Grain Bin Safety Week message is for producers to evaluate safety procedures on their farms and ranches, and slow down and be safe, “your family will thank you for it.”Source: USDA Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Ag Secretary Proclaims This Grain Bin Safety Weeklast_img read more

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US – RSF launches #DefendPressFreedom campaign ahead of midterm elections

first_img“This is not a partisan issue; it is a fundamental right that impacts every American no matter their politics,” says Margaux Ewen, RSF’s North America Director. “In a democracy like the United States, no journalist should be arrested, assaulted, or threatened for simply doing their job.” WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists United StatesAmericas Protecting journalists Organisation On June 28th, 2018 one of the most horrific attacks on press freedom in the US unfolded when five employees, including four reporters, were killed at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland. This shooting did not happen in a vacuum: open hostility against journalists is on the rise in the US. While covering the February 2018 school shooting in Parkland, Florida, journalists were impersonated on social media, impeding their ability to accurately investigate the facts and disseminate information that could be vital for preventing similar tragedies. In May 2017, then-congressional candidate Greg Gianforte body-slammed Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs on the eve of his special election to the US House of Representatives after Jacobs persistently asked him questions regarding healthcare reform – an issue that impacts every American. Jacobs is just one of 45 journalists to be physically attacked in 2017, along with at least 34 more this year. More and more journalists and media outlets have reported being the target of death threats in relation to the stories they cover. To learn more about the campaign, visit the #DefendPressFreedom webpage. June 3, 2021 Find out more September 12, 2018 – Updated on September 13, 2018 US – RSF launches #DefendPressFreedom campaign ahead of midterm elections As the US midterm elections approach, RSF and its coalition of partners including the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, Asian American Journalists Association, International Press Institute, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Media Law Resource Center, the Newseum and its Freedom Forum Institute, Free Press Action Fund, the National Press Club, News Media Alliance, National Press Photographers Association, PEN America, the Society of Professional Journalists, and more are launching the #DefendPressFreedom campaign, which urges voters to contact their candidate through phone calls, letters, at town hall meetings, or on social media, and ask them where they stand on press freedom. By doing this, RSF hopes to bring to light the critically important role that journalists play in the US, as well as the dire need to preserve press freedom in the midst of its concerningly steady decline. It is vital to remember the crucial role journalists play in empowering the community to make more informed decisions and to hold those in power accountable. This is why it’s time to remind those running for office of the importance of an independent and free media. It’s time to #DefendPressFreedom. Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says News to go further News News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and 21 partner organizations launched a campaign today to encourage voters to ask their congressional candidates in the United States midterm elections where they stand on press freedom. The campaign seeks to galvanize the American public in protecting and defending the First Amendment. Follow the news on United States RSF_en United StatesAmericas Protecting journalists Help by sharing this information June 7, 2021 Find out more In the US, assaults against reporters, photojournalists, and media workers are becoming more and more commonplace. Physical, verbal, and online attacks against reporters undermine the media’s role as a critical pillar of democracy, consequently creating opportunities for government overreach, the erosion of the First Amendment, and infringing on the public’s right to be informed. Receive email alerts News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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OC board to hear reports

first_img WhatsApp Pinterest By admin – January 30, 2018 Odessa High’s Jesus Montes (12) passes the ball in the first half of the Bronchos’ 2-1 loss to the Del Rio Rams, Tuesday night at Ratliff Stadium. The Odessa College Board of Trustees will meet at 6:30 p.m. today in the Zant Room of on the second floor of the Saulsbury Campus Center on campus, 201 W. University Blvd.Some of the items on the agenda are:Request for consent from the board of trustees of the Odessa Junior College District to sell property for less than the market value specified in the judgment of foreclosure and also less than the amount of judgment.Consider and approve request for a tax abatement.Financial reports: Monthly financial statements and budget amendments and the quarterly investment report.Appoint a representative to the Globe Theater board for 2018.Review Odessa College’s mission statement.The board will hear a Black History Month preview from Vice President for Student Services Kim McKay.Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness Don Wood will present an institutional effectiveness report.OC President Gregory Williams will present the president’s report including a National Association of Schools of Music music accreditation; associate degree nursing pass rates; photography students selected for an exhibit; Paragon Award nomination; Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools fifth year report; Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Award of Excellence; and new goals. Facebook WhatsApp Local NewsEducation Pinterest OC board to hear reports Twitter Facebook Twitter Previous articleBefore You Say ‘I Do’Next articleCHAPMAN: The trouble with Medicaid work requirements adminlast_img read more