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The Mediterranean hydrologic budget from a Late Miocene global climate simulation

first_imgDuring the Late Miocene the Mediterranean experienced a period of extreme salinity fluctuations known as the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The causes of these high amplitude changes in salinity are not fully understood but are thought to be the result of restriction of flow between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, eustatic sea level change and climate. Results from a new Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulation of Late Miocene climate for the Mediterranean and adjacent regions are presented here. The model, HadAM3, was forced by a Late Miocene global palaeogeography, higher CO2 concentrations and prescribed sea surface temperatures. The results show that fluvial freshwater fluxes to the Mediterranean in the Late Miocene were around 3 times greater than for the present day. Most of this water was derived from North African rivers, which fed the Eastern Mediterranean. This increase in runoff arises from a northward shift in the intertropical convergence zone caused by a reduced latitudinal gradient in global sea surface temperatures. The northwards drainage of the Late Miocene Chad Basin also contributes. Numerical models designed to explore Late Miocene salt precipitation regimes in the Mediterranean, which typically make use of river discharge fluxes within a few tens of percent of present-day values, may therefore be grossly underestimating these fluxes. Although the AGCM simulated Late Miocene river discharge is high, the model predicts a smaller net hydrologic budget (river discharge plus precipitation minus evaporation) than for present day. We discuss a possible mechanism by which this change in the hydrologic budget, coupled with a reduced connection between the Mediterranean and the global ocean, could cause the salinity fluctuations of the MSC.last_img read more

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Keble boys cause college ruckus

first_imgKeble College rugby team are facing disciplinary action after wreaking havoc at St Peter’s College during a crew date.The event was held between the Keble team and the St. Peter’s girls’ drinking society, Vagina Dentata.After spending the evening in St. Peter’s bar, members of the rugby team then went on to urinate in the college memorial garden and verbally abused members of the college, and members of the public. According to an email circulated around the JCR, the team are also accused of “treating college property with a lack of respect”, with particular relation to an incident where a disabled tutor’s bicycle was knocked over and college flower beds were unsettled.One St. Peter’s student commented that it was the incident involving the bike which “caused the most upset in the college.”She added, “Apart from that, it was just drunken behaviour.”Sanjay Nanwani, St. Peter’s JCR president, described the incident, saying, “A crew date of sorts went out of hand last Friday when a group of Keble students turned rowdy and began to engage in what they themselves have acknowledged to be offensive, disruptive and unacceptable behaviour.”However, many members of the college are still unsure as to exactly what damage was caused.Nanwani commented, “I haven’t heard any consistent version of events and nothing has been officially verified.”The Keble team have issued a formal apology including flowers to members of St. Peter’s college, including the JCR, the porters, members of the decanal team and the tutor who owned the bicycle.St Peter’s JCR passed a motion to accept the team’s apology and pursue them for the costs of any damage caused, with Nanwani saying, “It is my belief that the Keble students are truly remorseful and accept full collective responsibility for their actions.”The motion submitted to the JCR acknowledged, “On the phone, the organiser of their group emphasised that at the time they did not realise the implications of their actions, namely that it was the bike of a man otherwise immobile, and that the garden was a memorial.”He added, “Although I replied that it is still unacceptable to behave the way they did, ignorant or not to the extent of their affliction, this should be taken on board.”Zain Talyarkhan, Keble JCR president, commented, “I’ve spoken personally to all the individuals who were involved in the incidents at St. Peter’s. They are all extremely sorry for their behaviour and have made personal apologies to those affected by their unacceptable actions.”He added, “They are all facing serious disciplinary actions within the College and so I am satisfied with the result. The JCR condemns their actions and we hope nothing like this will occur in future.”Students at St. Peter’s college are also facing disciplinary action because they did not inform the college that the crew date was going to take place. One female student said, “There has been disciplinary action taken, but it’s not too serious.”last_img read more

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Courting controversy at Worcester

first_imgWorcester College has announced plans to build a new lecture theatre on one of its tennis courts.The planned building would include not only a lecture theatre but also additional meeting rooms and a studio. If planning permission is granted, it will be completed in early 2016.The Estates Bursar explained why such a project is necessary, saying, “Worcester has no facilities of appropriate size – we have a  forty-seat lecture theatre and a seventy to eighty-seat flat meeting room, so we need one so that we can accommodate entire year groups, and generally improve student facilities.”The plans have been met with enthusiasm by Worcester students, Alfie Hinchliffe, the JCR President, said, “The Worcester JCR loves the plans for the new lecture theatre. It’s not as though it’s going to be a noisy, lengthy, disruptive building project that will obscure the views from our existing accommodation like Exeter’s proposal would, will it? Oh wait… But in all seriousness, the theatre plans look good. In fact Worcester students love building. We’ve spent the past year building a very impressive new relationship between ourselves and the Exeter JCR. Admittedly there was some disruption (and the roof is very garish) but it does have excellent views of a future with us living together as happy neighbours.”Hinchliffe’s comments touch on previous contentions between Exeter and Worcester over Exeter’s plans to develop what was previously Ruskin College. In Trinity last year Worcester’s Provost, Professor Jonathan Bate, sent an email to Worcester JCR encouraging students to complain about Exeter’s plans, noting such issues as “inappropriately garish and intrusive materials proposed for its roof and upper level.”  Such comments were met with criticism from his own students.In this instance, Exeter’s Rector Frances Cairncorss has been slightly more reserved, encouraging Exeter students to attend a public consultation. “Since this may affect the views from our new Walton Street Building, it would be useful for as many people as possible to have an opportunity to view and comment upon their proposal,” Cairncross said.However, Exeter JCR President Ed Nickell appears fully behind the plans: “This lecture room is a good thing for Worcester students and Exeter JCR would never stand in the way of that. Just as Worcester JCR did not stand in the way of Exeter increasing our currently paltry accommodation provision. There is much more solidarity amongst JCR members than amongst Heads of houses! Thanks to this solidarity, Worcester will gain a lecture room and Exonians will escape evil landlords, mouldy bedrooms and exorbitant rents.A public consultation will be held at 2pm on Thursday 21 November.last_img read more

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Shore True Value in Somers Point, a True Family-Owned Business

first_imgShore True Value Hardware in Somers Point, family owned for 60 years, delivers top notch customer service and a variety of items to choose from. By Maddy VitalePaul Giunta and his sister Alison Dannenhower are certain they learned what it means to be good business owners from the best – their father Paul Giunta Sr.And if you think about the longevity of success since their grandfather Sam Giunta started Shore True Value Hardware in 1958, followed by their father taking it over 21 years later, they are probably right.“When I bring new people in to work I say, ‘You can get a broader selection and maybe a lower price at a Home Depot, but you won’t get the same customer service,” Paul Giunta said in between doing work on the computer and checking on staff at Shore True Value Hardware in Somers Point. “That is the reason why we have been here for 60 years.”From paint, to flooring, to tools, to gardening supplies, to a vast selection of Weber grills and even street hockey equipment, Shore True Value gives the customers what they want, Giunta said.Top sellers in all hardware stores are the same, Giunta said.“We all sell paint, fertilizers, light bulbs. But things you can find here we have a niche in are the nuts and bolts,” Giunta said. “We have a lot of fittings and repair part for fixtures. It might sit on the shelf for six months, but we have it.”Shore True Value owners and siblings Paul Giunta and Alison Dannenhower, both of Somers Point, say they listen to what customers want when stocking items.Since Giunta, 47, and Dannenhower, 51, both of Somers Point, bought the business from parents Paul and Alice Giunta 11 years ago, and really focused on capturing a niche market, especially when competing with big box home improvement stores in the area.“I like to hear, ‘I’ve been to five places,’” Giunta explained of the do-it-yourself buyers who often enter the doors. “It is the guy doing it himself on a Saturday who has to fix his faucet. We do have lots of contractors but predominantly it is the do-it-yourselfer.”A popular specialty item at Shore True Value is a full line of street hockey equipment. It is a draw that brings people into the store with new customers, Giunta said.“Somers Point, Egg Harbor Township, Linwood and Ocean City all use street hockey stuff,” Giunta said. “We carry sticks, helmets, shin guards, gloves and balls. In September when signups begin my guys size them with shin guards and everything they need.”They also stock Telescope beach chairs, items Giunta described as the best beach chairs on the market.Customers can choose from a vast selection of Weber grills with the option of delivery.Knowing what to purchase to set them above other stores comes with experience, Giunta said.“A lot of times you have customers coming in saying they want something,” Giunta said. “You have to listen to the customers first and foremost and that is how you build your assortment and see what moves and what hasn’t sold in a year.”And there is no question, the family has built up a strong base of customers over the years through the True Value Rewards Program.“I think I have 17,000 people signed up. We incentivize our cashiers to sell the programs. Customers can track their points and they receive rewards certificates.”Longtime customers and ones celebrating birthdays also receive additional rewards.Lawn care products fills several aisles.What keeps the siblings successful how they run the operations of Shore True Value.Dannenhower, a married mother of three, handles the back office and Giunta handles the front end of the store.“We help each other a lot,” Giunta said.Giunta joined the family business after he graduated from college in 1992 with a degree in retail management. But his love for the business began when he was young.“As far as I can remember, when I would drive my mom nuts, she would send me to the store. I would sweep the floors and pound nails,” Giunta explained with a laugh. “I worked there all through high school. I went to college with the intention of working in the family business.”Dannenhower found her way into the business a couple of years earlier after she discovered beauty school was not her thing. Her first task was to computerize the entire business, a daunting task that she did with relish, Giunta said.The siblings’ recipe for success includes their separate and distinct skills.“I think my parents are probably proud,” Giunta said. “My father worked extremely hard in the business. I would say much harder than us. With computerization and other processes, it has become easier.”From the warehouse to the store, customers are treated to top service by skilled employees.And like any good business owners, you are only as good as the people you hire.“I am not on the floor. I have two store managers. We have been very fortunate,” Giunta, a married father of two, said.The overwhelming theme of the store is longevity. So, it would only make sense that some of their top employees have worked at the store for decades.Carpenters, electricians, plumbers and other specialty trained staff are on the floor, specially trained in many areas.“We just show them the system. They all have a lot of different product knowledge,” Giunta said.Throughout the year the store employees help a steady stream of customers.The store, which has been in the same location since 1968, after relocating from a strip mall in Somers Point, is 10,000 square feet with 2,000 square feet of warehouse space.Making it a top priority to be not only a business partner in the community, but a real part of their hometown, is something both Giunta and Dannenhower strive to achieve.“One of the things we pride ourselves in is giving back to community. We participate in the Good old Days Festival and the “Run For Bud” race. We try to sponsor everything we can. The people in the community support us, so we do our best to support them.”Giunta said, “Our customers do surveys by the hundreds and they are all positive comments. It is all about the experience in the store. It makes you feel like we are doing something right here.”The store, located at 515 New Road in Somers Point, is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit www.shorehardware.com or call (609) 927-6464.Shore True Value Hardware is located at 515 New Road in Somers Point.last_img read more

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Great British Bake Off returns

first_imgReady, set, bake…! Popular TV show The Great British Bake Off will return to screens on Wednesday, 6 August.  This is the fifth series of the baking competition, which is judged by Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry. The show will be aired on BBC One instead of the programme’s usual platform of BBC Two.Comedian Jo Brand will present a spin off show on BBC Two, called The Great British Bake Off – An Extra Slice. This will feature bonus interviews and footage from the heats of the hit baking programme.The series launches after the news this week that BskyB had acquired a majority stake in the production company behind the show. The satellite giant bought a 70% stake in Love Productions in a deal reportedly worth around £24.5m.Watch the teaser trailer from the BBC below, featuring lovable presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc:last_img read more

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Pieminister turnover up 15% following investment

first_imgPremium pie business Pieminister has recorded its fourth consecutive year of double-digit growth.Sales at the family-run business, which supplies supermarkets and operates its own restaurants, rose 15% year-on-year to £16.6m in the year ended 31 March 2019. The business recorded profit before tax of £349k, after making a £310k loss in the previous year.Pieminister said the turnaround was “testament to a robust plan” and investment, including the expansion of its bakery in Bristol.The expansion gave the business capacity to manufacture a range of four snacking patties that have been listed nationally in Sainsbury’s and in pubs and independent retailers.The company said it had bucked the trend in the restaurant sector, reporting 28% growth in the year. The performance was a result of continued restaurant roll-out in UK university cities, stated Pieminister, which has opened new sites in Sheffield and Liverpool.Tie-ups with businesses including Picture House Cinemas, Go Ape and the Hilton Group – in which Pieminister offers a fully-branded range of pies – had also grown.Pieminister co-founder and managing director Jon Simon said the business planned to continue to develop a strong brand presence in retail and foodservice channels.“There are many exciting plans afoot as we enter 2020,” he added. “In particular, we’re preparing to launch a major tree-planting initiative this spring, which we hope will also encourage the most committed carnivores to try our ever-growing range of plant-based pies and patties, for the health and wellbeing of both people and planet.”last_img read more

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Enchanted Realms: Farmington Underground’s newest interactive show

first_imgEnchanted Realms is a new virtual escape room offered in collaboration by Farmington Underground and the Western Maine Play Museum.FARMINGTON – Farmington Underground has partnered with the Maine Play Museum to create its newest interactive activity for families. Enchanted Realms is a show which asks families to help fairy tale characters complete quests by solving puzzles within their own homes. The show takes place entirely over Zoom, integrating virtual resources and live entertainment.“I’ve been wanting to create something specifically for families for a while now,” said Farmington Underground owner Joe Musumeci. “It’s less of a show with a live audience and more like an interactive scavenger hunt. But there’s a story too. So, it’s a story, a show, and an adventure. It’s a blend of all of these things.”Musumeci collaborated with staff at the Maine Play Musuem to try and include a variety of activities that children of many ages would enjoy. The project came together as a way to offer something new for families to do within the safety of their own homes.“It was fun to discuss different ideas for the show. We know it’s a new concept and is a little experimental. But if it goes well, we might continue to do this kind of thing together in the future,” said Musumeci.Families sign up to “travel” from room to room, each room within the show dedicated to a different fairy tale character, performed by a local actor, who will provide them with puzzles and ask the family to assist them in different ways. Each character activity is designed to last 5-15 minutes and there are multiple activities assigned to each room. The puzzles often require families to utilize everyday household objects to complete tasks. Some place an emphasis on engineering or science and mathematics games, asking families to build something within a set amount of time, but others are more artistic or home-based. For instance, one task asks families to bake a mug cake in order to help one of the fairy tale characters.“The thought is that all the characters live in the same realm, so their stories are intertwined, but families still get the chance to have that one-on-one time with each character to complete those tasks,” said Musumeci.Families have the choice of which rooms they enter and are given a list of the activities they’ll be asked to complete in each room and what supplies they’ll need prior to the night of the show. This allows families the time to acquire the necessary materials for whatever rooms they choose.“I hope that families learn new ways of working together as a team and gives them a chance to collaborate and invent together,” said Musumeci.Enchanted Realms will be offered on March 13 and April 10. Families can either purchase a standard ticket for $35, giving them an interactive show lasting an hour and a half, or a VIP ticket for $55 which gives them 2 and a half hours. Showtimes are 2 p.m. for the standard ticket holders and 1 p.m. for the VIP ticket holders.last_img read more

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Justice Releases ‘Safe and Sound’, First New Track In Five Years

first_img[story via Pitchfork – photo via TenementTV] It has been five long years since French electronic duo Justice have released new original material, but that wait is finally over. The duo of Gaspard Michel Andre Augé and Xavier de Rosnay have released their latest track “Safe and Sound“, which debuted at the Ed Banger House Party at the Sónar 2016 Music Festival back in June, during Pedro Winter’s (aka Busy P) DJ set.The duo has kept a fairly low profile since releasing Audio, Video, Disco back in 2011, with the subsequent tour in support of the album. With rare appearances at festival such as Coachella, Osheaga, Outside Lands and New Orleans’ Voodoo Experience, as well as the release of their live album Access All Arenas in 2013, Justice has been relatively quiet.It looks like things are about to change, as Paris and London-based independent record label Because Music revealed that the group is currently in the process of signing record release documents, making a potential release imminent. Busy P also revealed that the group was working on new material back in March, stating “they are locked in the studio every day”, via Tenement TV.In the meantime, listen to the the latest Justice track, which features some funky slap bass, along with string and choral arrangements.last_img read more

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Anstead named Chief Justice

first_img The Jacksonville native’s term begins July 1 Anstead named Chief Justice Anstead named Chief Justice May 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Born and raised in a single-parent home in Jacksonville’s Brentwood housing project during the Great Depression, Harry Lee Anstead began work at a young age, cutting lawns, moving furniture, doing anything to help support his family and build a future career for himself as a lawyer.Anstead, 64, advanced that career to the highest judicial office in state government on April 10 when the members of the Florida Supreme Court announced they had unanimously elected him chief jus-tice for a two-year term beginning July 1. Anstead will be Florida’s 50th chief justice.He said that the major priority of his administration will be maintaining the excellence of Florida’s trial courts during a time of transition. Under a 1998 constitutional amendment, funding for many trial court programs will shift from county budgets to the state budget by 2004. Implementation of this change still must be worked out with the legislature.“Florida’s trial courts have been universally recognized as models in programs like treatment-based drug courts, mediation, and unified family courts, to name only a few,” Anstead said. “My goal is to ensure that we maintain this standard of excellence during the reorganization of state courts mandated by the voters in 1998.”Other issues on the future-Chief Justice’s agenda include those affecting children in the courts, including possible reforms and heightened attention to the juvenile justice system.“We in the justice system should feel privileged that our society has placed its most troubled children on our doorstep, and I am concerned that we respond effectively,” Anstead said. “One of the most stirring pleas I have ever heard was the late Gov. Lawton Chiles’ last ‘state of the state’ speech, in which he declared that the one overriding issue we face in Florida is the way we treat our children — all of them.”Anstead worked his way through undergraduate and law school at the University of Florida, and he later earned a master of laws degree in the judicial process at the University of Virginia. Between undergraduate and law school, he served with the National Security Agency in Washington, D.C.Anstead began his legal career as a trial and appellate attorney until he became a judge of the Fourth District Court of Appeal in 1977, where he also served as chief judge, as well as serving from time-to-time as a circuit and county judge throughout the district. On August 29, 1994, he moved to the Florida Supreme Court through appointment by Chiles.While on the high court, Anstead initiated a comprehensive statewide program to improve professionalism among judges, lawyers, and law schools in the state. His initiative led to the creation of a permanent Center for Professionalism at The Florida Bar that the ABA has recognized as one of the most significant professionalism initiatives in the nation. Anstead has been called the father of the professionalism movement in Florida.Anstead’s life remains rooted in his experiences growing up in Jacksonville. For example, he always uses his full name — Harry Lee — because it honors an important figure in his early life. Many neighbors helped Loretta Anstead and her family after her husband abandoned the family shortly after Justice Anstead was born. One who helped was named Harry Lee Minor, and when Anstead expressed dislike for the name “Harry” his mother reminded him of its origin. He has proudly been “Harry” ever since.“My mother is my personal hero,” Anstead said. “It was a tribute to her tenacity that she did anything to support, keep us together, and managed to get us a unit in the Brentwood project, which at the time was much sought after, with its nearby schools and parks.”Life was still rough-and-tumble for Anstead. For a long time in the 1940s, his was the only Catholic family living in the housing project, and his best friend was from the only Jewish family. Both endured harassment because of their religious beliefs. While working as a laborer for a moving company in Jacksonville, Anstead’s work-mate and friend was a young African-American teenager.“We started work very early, so lunch was the high point of the day,” Anstead said. “But when it came time for lunch, I had to go inside and bring our lunches out for us to eat. Only whites were allowed inside in those days. The impact of discrimination is something I can never forget.”Through these experiences Anstead said he learned the positive message of tolerance very early.Anstead and his wife Sue, a child advocate before moving to Tallahassee, have five children — Chris, Jim, Laura, Amy, and Michael, and one grandchild, Ashlee Marie.last_img read more

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Fatigue is killing our productivity

first_imgI recently spoke with a good friend who is the CEO of a credit union.  I asked him what he struggled with, as CEO.Staff burnout, he said.  Almost without hesitation.Since the great recession and beyond, he’s been asking his staff to do more, with less.  They are very successful, but cracks are beginning to show.  And he worries how much longer things can stay the same.Does that sound familiar?  I bet it does.  We struggle with that at NAFCU, as well.Fatigue, it turns out, is a real threat to productivity.  This article (HBR.org) by Tony Schwartz does a great job of highlighting the issue.One CEO of a multinational company told me that just dealing with time differences had left him so exhausted he was seriously considering quitting. Another CEO at a much-admired company told me that for the first time, he’s losing truly valued employees who say they simply can’t take it anymore. In a recent survey at a third organization, over 80% of the top 400 leaders reported they spend the majority of their days feeling negative emotions, fueled in large part by overload and overwhelm. (Emphasis added.)I’ve written about this before.  In a post about “decision fatigue”, I wrote about research that showed how decision making abilities break down when people are overloaded by problems.Schwartz argues that companies must find ways to renew and reinvigorate their workforce.  Otherwise, they face higher turnover, and less productivity from those who remain.Ah, but there’s the rub.  We need work to be done.  We must balance our budgets. So how do we accomplish the renewal that Schwartz talks about?I’ll take any good ideas that you guys have. Seriously.  But here are some thoughts.I think it is a 2-part task.  Part of it is on companies.  But the other is on the employee.As employers, we need to allow for balance in the lives of our colleagues.  We must look for signs of burnout, and intervene as necessary.  And we must ruthlessly prioritize.  If we are doing things that don’t jive with our strategic plans, or are not necessary today, we need to consider why we are doing them.On the other hand, as individuals, we need to take more control over our lives.  If I lined up what I do (personal and work) versus what is truly important to me and my family, I know I’d see a disconnect. For example, through Facebook, I keep in touch with hundreds of friends from high school and college. Twenty years ago, that would not have been possible.  Is that good or bad?  Probably both. While it is great to “like” an update from a buddy’s Facebook page, am I spreading myself too thin?  Should I trade in some of this stuff for a more simple, management life?I wish I had answers here, guys. So if any of you have tips to battle fatigue, I’m all ears. I truly believe this is one of those issues that we’ll have to deal with sooner rather than later. 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Anthony Demangone Anthony Demangone is executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU). Demangone oversees day-to-day operations and manages the association’s education, membership, … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com/partner/nafcu Detailslast_img read more

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