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Watch Lettuce Perform New Song “Blaze” On Jam Cruise [Pro-Shot]

first_imgJam Cruise has shared a pro-shot video of Lettuce performing big on the Norwegian Pearl from earlier this year. Regular suspects on “the boat,” the New York funk lords played two sets over the course of four nights during the 2017 event. For their first performance, the funk powerhouse charged through the Stardust Theater with another spectacular set. When Adam Deitch (drums), Jesus Coomes (bass), Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff (guitar), Neal Evans (keys), Nigel Hall (keys, vocals) and The Shady Horns’ saxophonist Ryan Zoidis and trumpeter Eric “Benny” Bloom are on the same stage, great, firing things happen – such as been the case for the last 25 years!See below for their performance of “Blaze,” a song expected to be on the band’s upcoming record. Featuring some especially psychedelic playing from Zoidis, “Blaze” just might be the new funk anthem of the future. Shortly after this video was shared, drummer Adam Deitch wrote on Facebook that the song would appear on the band’s upcoming album. Check it out below:Don’t miss Lettuce at their inaugural Funk of Ages this summer, along with a summer full of festivals including North Coast Music Fest!last_img read more

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Food safety’s big cheese

first_imgMorgan RoanUniversity of GeorgiaDr. Elsa A. Murano, secretary of Food Safety and Inspection Service for the United States Department of Agriculture, will deliver this year’s Woodroof Lecture at the University of Georgia in Athens.Set for Thursday, April 22, at 2 p.m., the lecture will be held in Masters Hall at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education. A reception will follow at 3 p.m.Murano will speak on “Legislating Logic: Infusing Science into Food Safety Regulations.” Sworn into her position by Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman on October 2, 2001, Murano oversees the policies and programs of the nation’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.Before joining USDA, from 2001 until her appointment, Murano served as a member of the USDA National Advisory Committee for Meat and Poultry Inspection. Since 1998 she also served on the National Alliance for Food Safety Operations Committee, which she chaired in 2000.She has extensive public and private experience in the field of food safety and has held several positions with Texas A&M University at College Station, Texas. Most recently, she served as the director of the university’s Center for Food Safety within the Institute of Food Science and Engineering. While at Texas A&M, she also served on the university’s Department of Animal Science Research Advisory Committee, the Food Safety Response Team of the Texas Agriculture Extension Service, and chaired the Food Safety State Initiative Committee of the Texas Agriculture Experiment Station.Prior to her Texas appointment, Murano served as a professor-in-charge of research programs at the Linear Accelerator Facility at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.She was a member of several professional organizations, which included the American Society for Microbiology, the Association of Meat Science, the Institute of Food Technologists, the Poultry Science Association, and the International Association of Food Protection.A native of Havana, Cuba, Murano holds a B.S. degree in biological sciences from Florida International University in Miami, a M.S. degree in anaerobic microbiology and a Ph.D. in food science and technology, both from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Va. The Woodroof Lecture is presented annually in honor and memory of Dr. J.G. Woodroof, a pioneer in food science research and UGA Alumni Distinguished Professor Emeritus. The lecture is sponsored by the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology and the UGA Food Science and Technology Club.The Woodroof Lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology at (706) 542-2286.last_img read more

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Peanut flavor

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaA peanut’s taste has a lot to do with when it’s harvested, says a University of Georgia professor.A peanut that can muster a “roasted peanutty” taste is the crème de la crème of the peanut butter industry, which most Georgia peanuts are grown to supply, said John Beasley, a crop scientist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.But sometimes after being processed, a peanut can have an off flavor, tasting a little like paint or cardboard, among other things a peanut shouldn’t taste like, he said.Beasley has conducted research over the past three years to learn, along with yield data, how newer peanut varieties and an established variety taste, when harvested early, on time and late.In randomized tests, he harvested newer peanut varieties like Carver, AP-3, C-99R, Georgia-01R and Georgia-02C 10 days early, on time and 10 days late. He did the same with the industry standard variety, Georgia Green.Selected peanuts were sent to two flavor-testing labs. Across the board, the time of harvest dictated how tasty the peanuts were, he said. Peanuts harvested too early had an off flavor.But waiting too long to harvest can be bad, too. A farmer can lose as much as 300 pounds per acre in yields if peanuts are harvested too late. Georgia farmers averaged about 2,870 pounds per acre last year.”But Georgia has maintained a reputation for having the best, most consistent-tasting peanuts around because our growers get the crop in when it needs to come in,” Beasley said. “We need to continue doing this, because the peanut industry is competitive, and consumers will taste the difference.”Not all peanuts are equal. They don’t mature at the same time. Late-maturing varieties take 155-160 days to mature. Mid-maturing varieties take 135-140 days.But environmental conditions can throw maturity dates off, he said.That’s why farmers need to use the hull-scrape method and not just count days. With the hull-scrape method, the thin, outer-layer of the shell is scraped off. The hue of the remaining shell is compared to a profile board. The darker the hue, the more mature the peanut is. “It’s still the best way to know the maturity of peanuts,” Beasley said.Although new varieties are making their way into farmers’ fields, the workhorse continues to be Georgia Green. The UGA peanut breeding program released it in 1995 as a mid-maturing, disease-resistant, high-yielding and flavorful peanut. It alone accounted for 70 percent of Georgia’s 755,000 acres last year.Tomato spotted wilt virus hit Georgia peanuts hard last year. It infected about 8 percent of the crop, a level not seen since the mid-1990s, when the disease became the primary concern for the industry.”Farmers and the peanut industry are always looking for more disease-resistant, higher-performing varieties,” Beasley said.And the peanut consumer will always be the final judge, he said.Cool, dry weather in the fall of 1986 prompted many Southern farmers to harvest peanuts early. That resulted in many immature peanuts making it into peanut butter. The problem soon became obvious, when the industry started getting reports of sour-tasting peanut butter.Some Georgia farmers have started planting peanuts this year. But using a UGA index that helps farmers reduce the risk of tomato spotted wilt virus, most now plant peanuts in mid-May. They harvest them in late September and October.last_img read more

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California, Hawaii markets drive surge in residential storage

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The historically tiny residential energy storage segment won big in Q1 2018, according to the latest deployment data.Utility-scale projects, the usual workhorse of the energy storage industry, dropped massively compared to last year’s Q1, when the Aliso Canyon procurements came online and set a record for energy capacity. What saved the quarter from historically low performance turned out to be the aggregate growth of all the little systems popping up in customers’ homes.“Residential storage has been growing in popularity and prominence,” said Brett Simon, senior analyst at GTM Research. “It’s getting cheaper. Folks are more aware of it and are asking for it. Solar installers are doubling down on it as a new business model.”Residential deployments beat commercial deployments, 15.9 megawatts to 11.7 megawatts, according to the latest Energy Storage Monitor from GTM Research and the Energy Storage Association. Even more impressively, home batteries rivaled utility-scale deployments, which only clocked in at 16 megawatts.That’s an unprecedented and jolting development that is worth emphasizing. Ever since GTM Research began tracking storage deployments in 2013, residential batteries appeared as the faintest of slivers on the industrywide bar graph, nonzero but totally insubstantial.Dialing into the numbers, it’s clear that California and Hawaii drove this newfound strength with state-level growth that merits no less than the technical designation: “bonkers.”More: Residential batteries almost beat out utility-scale deployments last quarter California, Hawaii markets drive surge in residential storagelast_img read more

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Carlisle Sports & Outdoors Nationals

first_imgTop Races and Events to hit before the end of the year:Carlisle Sports & Outdoor NationalsWhen: September 6, 2013 – September 8, 2013Where: Carlisle Fairgrounds, Carlisle, PennsylvaniaWhat: Outdoors FestivalWebsite: www.CarlisleSportsOutdoor.com September 6-8, 2013 at the Carlisle PA Fairgrounds! Buy, Sell and Trade Everything Outdoor-Related. PA State Knife and Tomahawk Championships, Archery Shoots, Calling Contests, Gun Show, Powersports Demos, Interactive Seminars and more. Win a Ford Raptor or ride in a Monster Truck!The Sports and Outdoor Nationals will be unlike any other sports and outdoor themed event in the region. The weekend will feature a wide array of interactive and hands on events for enthusiasts of all ages, a swap meet for buying and selling used gear, equipment and apparel as well as a corral that will host everything from ATV’s to RV’s, boats to the trucks that pull them, campers and more. In addition, there will be safety courses, seminars and more offered, while an off road course is also planned for those wanting to get a little mud on the tires. Whether you hunt, fish, hike, race, camp or just love to enjoy what Mother Nature has to offer, this event is just for you.Visit CarlisleSportsOutdoor.com for details!Contactinfo@carlisleevents.com Check out our Fall Race Ahead Guide, for the top 25 races and events for the rest of the year!last_img read more

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Six Weeks in the Air: Tree-sitter addresses food and health concerns

first_imgOn day 42 of her tree-sit to block the Mountain Valley Pipeline from clearcutting and drilling through Jefferson National Forest and the Appalachian Trail, ‘Nutty’ addressed concerns about her food and water supplies and physical health in a post via Appalachians Against Pipelines:I wanted to write in response to the concerns I know many have expressed as to my health as I finish off my sixth week of living on this monopod.I have gallons of water stored. I still have a stock of energy bars and some packets of applesauce. This is, comparatively, an extremely mild form of deprivation, and one I’m fortunate my body seems to have adapted well to. Recently a doctor hiked up to check on me, and asked (via megaphone, over the noise of the generator the cops turned on) if I needed any medicine. I don’t; all the medicine I want right now is to hear that rebellion is spreading.A couple of members of the Giles County Rescue Squad (local ambulance, not rope rescue) have been coming here on their own time to check on me, and have been allowed to come in the closure and talk (though they cannot send anything up either). One of them warned me of the symptoms of rhabdomyolysis and kidney failure, which I am not experiencing, and said I was at increased risk of DVT (blood clots), which I mitigate by exercising my legs. Some aspects of living up here are uncomfortable, but none of this is life threatening as long as the support lines running to the four anchors for this pole remain intact.There are far too many who do face life threatening risks from pipelines in our region.Countless people and families are being confronted with the future of having their homes become part of the blast zone of pipelines carrying highly explosive fracked gas. Communities like Union Hill along the Atlantic Coast Pipeline route are being threatened with the toxic fumes of compressor stations.Fight for their (and for your) health.Tracts of contiguous forest habitat are being fragmented by pipelines, forested wetlands destroyed, waterways and aquifers threatened by inevitable pipeline leaks and spills.Fight for their health.We live in a toxic civilization that is killing us all (some faster than others) and decimating the health of our planet at a terrifying rate.So we all have some major health concerns. Enough, certainly, to take the fire in our hearts, our rage against all that is happening to us, our families, our friends, our earth, and let it loose against those trying to destroy us.Let’s prove that when the cops and pipeline security lounge and laugh at their camp under the monopod, comfortable in their knowledge that I can’t stay up here forever, they are grievously underestimating our strength and our determination to keep on fighting. Not in one place, not with one tactic, but with myriad possibilities for confrontation, disruption and attack.Spread that fire.To support Nutty and the tree-sitters blocking the Mountain Valley Pipeline, visit donate: bit.ly/supportmvpresistancelast_img read more

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The Dominican Air Force Prepares to Prevent the Spread of Ebola

first_img“This format matches the international protocol and records the weaknesses and areas for improvement, a process in which the injured party is usually the health personnel, including doctors and nurses who have died,” Marte said to Dominican digital newspaper El Día. The Military Hospital is an advanced health center with the technological resources to assist patients infected with Ebola, according to Daniel Pou, a researcher at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences. Regional training to fight Ebola The training exercise began at 10:00 am when the immigration area of Las Americas International Airport assisted a passenger from Sierra Leone, Africa, who was showing symptoms of the virus– typically a high fever, headache, and sore throat. On October 10, the FARD medical community discussed the best ways to diagnose and treat patients infected with the deadly virus during the conference “Management and Protocols of Ebola.” Medical personnel at the conference also discussed how to identify Ebola symptoms and the safest methods to transport people infected with the virus. The conference was held at the Military Hospital. A well-prepared military hospital The goal of the drill was “to review and evaluate procedures for identification, isolation, transportation and handling of patients suspected of having Ebola,” said Dr. Jorge Marte Baez, the country’s national coordinator for Ebola response. Once they realized they were dealing with a possible case of Ebola, airport and health authorities immediately activated a predetermined procedure applied at airports and seaports to isolate those individuals who show symptoms of the disease. Wearing protective gear and using the appropriate safety measures, members of AMET transferred the ailing man to the Simulation Training Center for Ebola and Infectious Diseases at the Dr. Ramón de Lara Military Hospital, located in the San Isidro Air Base, east of the capital. There, doctors and nurses who are trained to treat Ebola, staff members from the Ministry of Public Health, and FARD officers followed protocols to provide the appropriate medical care. The Dominican Air Force mobilized a rapid response to a simulated spread of the deadly Ebola virus into the country during a training exercise on November 7. A well-prepared military hospital Preventing the spread of Ebola “The experience that military doctors have in the area of (disease) prevention and protecting public health is crucial,” according to Pou. Doctors and nurses were selected for this training based on their medical expertise, teaching experience and commitment to serve. Health staffs will be prepared to detect early cases of Ebola that may arise, offer treatment and prevent the spread of the disease. They could also be mobilized by WHO/PAHO to support the clinical response and control of outbreaks in any country in the region affected by Ebola, according to Notimex. Preventing the spread of Ebola By Dialogo December 02, 2014 Once they realized they were dealing with a possible case of Ebola, airport and health authorities immediately activated a predetermined procedure applied at airports and seaports to isolate those individuals who show symptoms of the disease. Wearing protective gear and using the appropriate safety measures, members of AMET transferred the ailing man to the Simulation Training Center for Ebola and Infectious Diseases at the Dr. Ramón de Lara Military Hospital, located in the San Isidro Air Base, east of the capital. There, doctors and nurses who are trained to treat Ebola, staff members from the Ministry of Public Health, and FARD officers followed protocols to provide the appropriate medical care. Military doctors would play a crucial role if a patient with Ebola were to enter the country. “This format matches the international protocol and records the weaknesses and areas for improvement, a process in which the injured party is usually the health personnel, including doctors and nurses who have died,” Marte said to Dominican digital newspaper El Día. The Dominican Republic has “mounted an isolation area and an amazing training center,” said Monica Guardo, a special representative of WHO/PAHO. The goal of the drill was “to review and evaluate procedures for identification, isolation, transportation and handling of patients suspected of having Ebola,” said Dr. Jorge Marte Baez, the country’s national coordinator for Ebola response. Responding to an infected ‘patient’ The Military Hospital is an advanced health center with the technological resources to assist patients infected with Ebola, according to Daniel Pou, a researcher at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences. In addition to the efforts of the Dominican Republic’s medical community, PAHO is training doctors and nurses in Latin American countries in the clinical management of Ebola from December 1-December 11, Notimex reported. Workshops for the Dominican Republic, Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago will take place in Antigua and Barbuda from December 1-3. Professionals from the remaining Latin American countries will attend workshops from December 3-11 in Chile. FARD pilot, Maj. Gen. Elvis M. Féliz Pérez, discussed the patient’s condition and the measures needed to keep the civilian population safe with Col. Ramon H. Artiles Santamaría, director of the Military Hospital. The Dominican Air Force mobilized a rapid response to a simulated spread of the deadly Ebola virus into the country during a training exercise on November 7. In the drill, an infected individual entered the country at the Las Americas International Airport. The Air Force responded quickly to protect the civilian population and provide appropriate medical care to the patient, all in coordination with two civilian agencies — the Specialized Airport and Civil Aviation Security Corps (CESAC) and the Civil Defense, Immigration and Metropolitan Transportation Authority (AMET). Military doctors would play a crucial role if a patient with Ebola were to enter the country. Doctors and nurses were selected for this training based on their medical expertise, teaching experience and commitment to serve. Health staffs will be prepared to detect early cases of Ebola that may arise, offer treatment and prevent the spread of the disease. They could also be mobilized by WHO/PAHO to support the clinical response and control of outbreaks in any country in the region affected by Ebola, according to Notimex. Responding to an infected ‘patient’ The training exercise began at 10:00 am when the immigration area of Las Americas International Airport assisted a passenger from Sierra Leone, Africa, who was showing symptoms of the virus– typically a high fever, headache, and sore throat. FARD pilot, Maj. Gen. Elvis M. Féliz Pérez, discussed the patient’s condition and the measures needed to keep the civilian population safe with Col. Ramon H. Artiles Santamaría, director of the Military Hospital. Military and civilian medical personnel have been training to prepare for a possible case of Ebola for weeks. As a consequence of the exercise, medical authorities have developed several recommendations to prepare for a real case of Ebola, such as increasing the amount of protective equipment available for doctors and nurses who treat patients infected with the deadly virus. The Dominican Republic has “mounted an isolation area and an amazing training center,” said Monica Guardo, a special representative of WHO/PAHO. About 70 medical personnel, who had trained for the drill for 25 days, participated in the exercise. As of November 28, the World Health Organization (WHO) had documented more than 16,000 cases of Ebola in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, with about 6,900 deaths. There have been no confirmed cases in Latin America. As a consequence of the exercise, medical authorities have developed several recommendations to prepare for a real case of Ebola, such as increasing the amount of protective equipment available for doctors and nurses who treat patients infected with the deadly virus. Military and civilian medical personnel have been training to prepare for a possible case of Ebola for weeks. In the drill, an infected individual entered the country at the Las Americas International Airport. The Air Force responded quickly to protect the civilian population and provide appropriate medical care to the patient, all in coordination with two civilian agencies — the Specialized Airport and Civil Aviation Security Corps (CESAC) and the Civil Defense, Immigration and Metropolitan Transportation Authority (AMET). “The experience that military doctors have in the area of (disease) prevention and protecting public health is crucial,” according to Pou. The simulated exercise lasted about four and a half hours, and was evaluated by representatives from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the WHO, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. They verified that hospital personnel followed established international procedures for treating patients with Ebola. On October 10, the FARD medical community discussed the best ways to diagnose and treat patients infected with the deadly virus during the conference “Management and Protocols of Ebola.” Medical personnel at the conference also discussed how to identify Ebola symptoms and the safest methods to transport people infected with the virus. The conference was held at the Military Hospital. In addition to the efforts of the Dominican Republic’s medical community, PAHO is training doctors and nurses in Latin American countries in the clinical management of Ebola from December 1-December 11, Notimex reported. Workshops for the Dominican Republic, Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago will take place in Antigua and Barbuda from December 1-3. Professionals from the remaining Latin American countries will attend workshops from December 3-11 in Chile. About 70 medical personnel, who had trained for the drill for 25 days, participated in the exercise. As of November 28, the World Health Organization (WHO) had documented more than 16,000 cases of Ebola in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, with about 6,900 deaths. There have been no confirmed cases in Latin America. On October 26, for example, the Ministry of Health provided Ebola prevention training to doctors and nurses in hospitals and private clinics. The training was also provided to medical personnel working at seaports, airports, and border crossings; regional health directors; epidemiologists; and directors of the regional headquarters of the Dominican Medical College. Regional training to fight Ebola The simulated exercise lasted about four and a half hours, and was evaluated by representatives from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the WHO, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. They verified that hospital personnel followed established international procedures for treating patients with Ebola. On October 26, for example, the Ministry of Health provided Ebola prevention training to doctors and nurses in hospitals and private clinics. The training was also provided to medical personnel working at seaports, airports, and border crossings; regional health directors; epidemiologists; and directors of the regional headquarters of the Dominican Medical College. last_img read more

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What happens when credit union members move away?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A new survey by The Filene Research Institute tracked 862 people who moved to a different U.S. city between 2011 and 2014 and found that 69 percent of them did not change their financial institution. Of the survey respondents, 80 percent were female, and 45 percent were between the ages of 18 and 29. The young demographic highlighted its preference for staying with their current credit union through the assistance of online tools, rather than changing after their move because local branches were no longer convenient.Technology key to keeping customersAccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American moves once every five years. In 2012 and 2013, the Bureau reported that 12 percent of the population – or 36 million people – relocated. Many moved within the same county or state, but others went to a completely different part of the country. No matter where they moved or what their reason for relocating was, the majority of survey participants opted to stay with their credit union.center_img continue reading »last_img read more

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Mr. Rogers on credit unions 2: Staying relevant to multiple generations

first_img 35SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bo McDonald Bo McDonald is president of Your Marketing Co. A marketing firm that started serving credit unions nearly a decade ago, offering a wide range of services including web design, branding, … Web: yourmarketing.co Details Culture changes. Every year, there are new words added to the dictionary, new regulations added to the books, and new songs to be sung. Some credit unions are lost in the hope to hold on to yesteryear. Some are hell-bent on chasing the shiny new objects. Which is the right way to serve your members, young and old? Mr. Rogers would say both.Fred Rogers’ show debuted in 1968 and aired until 2001. Surprisingly, very little changed in his appearance, his delivery, or his message during the three decades his show aired. So how did Mr. Rogers stay relevant to appeal to multiple generations with such success?The Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood brand consistently stood as a calm island in the changing sea of culture. When studied closely, there were many shifts in the nuances of his shows—from the anxieties he addressed to the topics he covered—but Mr. Rogers always found a way to address them from the peaceful and gracious stance that people came to expect from him. So what can credit unions learn from Mr. Rogers about relevancy through many generations?Stand firm in service. Credit Unions should be responsive to cultural shifts. You should have your eyes and ears on the latest changes, but do so in a way that always remembers why consumers need you. When you do this, you naturally respect their desires in the process. Remember why your credit union was chartered. There was a need. There still is. In his caring way, Mr. Rogers pointed in the right direction. “In times of stress, the best thing we can do for each other is to listen with our ears and our hearts and to be assured that our questions are just as important as our answers.” While the needs may be different or the way you solve members’ financial problems to help them achieve their dreams is different, the demand for financial institutions that are filling needs otherwise unmet by for-profit institutions is there. It always will be. As Mr. Rogers said, “One of the greatest dignities of humankind is that each successive generation is invested in the welfare of each new generation.”Go. Invest in human capital. Mr. Rogers proved it will return to you exponentially.last_img read more

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7 reasons to recruit a CIO for credit union boards

first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Terrence Griffin Terrence Griffin is Chief Information Officer of CO-OP Financial Services, a financial technology provider to credit unions based in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. (www.co-opfs.org). He can be reached at … Web: www.co-opfs.org Details With rapidly evolving technology in financial services today, there is a stronger emphasis than ever in business management and operations on the assessment and implementation of advanced systems and their interconnected components.Of course, this growing emphasis increases the responsibility of top management to have the knowledge to ensure that the technology a company adopts will perform as expected and be secure from harm. This can be a heavy load for a credit union chief executive officer to oversee, particularly at smaller institutions with commensurately smaller information technology resources. And, what is true for the CEO is certainly true for the credit union’s volunteer Board of Directors.As credit unions increasingly turn to fintech, having a technology expert on the Board of Directors can bring considerable value and key insights to this crucial area of need for credit unions.Credit unions should seek out and recruit Chief Information Officers from among their membership for their Board of Directors. Sure – great idea! It’s perhaps not as difficult as you might think. People with technology backgrounds, I believe, are aware that they have a unique gift, skill or training. In addition, many such people come from armed forces backgrounds, which make them open to calls to volunteerism and service.The Credentials of a CIOHere’s what a CIO can bring to a credit union Board of Directors:Experience. Someone who has risen to the level of CIO has been around for a while. They know their technology – but they also know a lot about life. A CIO on the Board of Directors can be a reliable source of counsel to a credit union’s CEO and its own CIO, as well as a mentor to inevitably mostly-young I.T. staffers at many credit unions.Different Perspective. Credit union boards can and should include members from many walks of life. The CIO’s perspective comes with his professional title – an ability to understand hard technological issues and solutions, see trends in fintech that the credit union needs to get hip to, and help the institution anticipate future needs. And, last but not least, the CIO can understand the jargon of technology, which can be a completely foreign language to many. Understand it, speak it, and translate it for their uninitiated fellow board members!Consulting Factor. Because technology is so complex, all organizations – no matter how big – call upon consultants regularly to help address their needs. A CIO on a CU board can help vet candidate consultants (as well as technical employees) for the institution. And, since a CIO’s role is largely one of consulting, they can often effectively act in the consultant’s role themselves.Understanding Risk. With the adoption of new technology comes new risks to member data security and potential fraud. A CIO can bring a level of understanding of this problem that other board members may not, and can help the board fulfill its oversight role as credit unions seek to keep up with member demands for the latest technology, and ahead of the talent of fraudsters to exploit new consumer conveniences.Project Management. In addition to consultation, the CIO’s working life is also one of soup to nuts project management. Project roadmaps for the successful, speedy and on-budget implementation of technology are almost as complex as the technology itself. Here again, the CIO can help the board fulfill its oversight role in a way that it may not otherwise be able to do.Understanding Relationships Between Business Units. The CIO of a large organization must often oversee the implementation of technology across widely different business units – some with legacy systems almost impossible to retire, some with the latest and greatest in I.T. The CIO can be a particularly valuable resource for a credit union here, given the long history of the movement, it’s often decentralized nature and the current trend towards merging smaller institutions.In addition, of course, I.T. is a department that services other departments. The CIO often has an understanding of an entire organization, which again can be put to the service of a credit union board of directors.Knowing the Difference Between a Sledge Hammer and the Right Hammer. Another important management benefit that an experienced CIO can bring to the board is to assist with the purchase of hardware and software systems that are squarely matched with the primary purpose of those systems. Often a company will buy a very expensive sledge hammer (technical solution) when something much smaller will do. The CIO can help a credit union make the right technology purchasing decisions and possibly save the institutions thousands of dollars – and a lot of time.Because credit unions by tradition are all about “people helping people,” they have a unique opportunity today to capitalize on consumer interest in doing business with companies that are doing good in their communities. The key, though, is to provide the technology that the modern consumer demands as well. The seven factors listed above – and others – make a CIO a valuable pilot helping credit unions and their volunteer boards navigate and stay relevant in today’s fintech revolution.last_img read more