HSBC to stop financing deforestation-linked palm oil firms

first_imgActivism, Banking, Conservation, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Role In Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Article published by mongabayauthor A recent Greenpeace report accused the bank of marshalling $16.3 billion in financing for six firms since 2012 that have illegally cleared forests, planted oil palm on carbon-rich peat soil and grabbed community lands.The investigation prompted scores of people to join a campaign to change the bank’s policies, including thousands of HSBC’s own customers.The bank’s new policy requires HSBC customers to commit to protecting natural forest and peatland by June 30, and provide independent verification of their own NDPE commitments by Dec. 31, 2018. Europe’s largest bank has published a new “no deforestation” policy in what environmental campaigners have dubbed a “first step” towards sustainable palm oil finance, which they urge other major creditors to follow if the world’s tropical rainforests are to be saved.HSBC last month revised its Agricultural Commodities Policy to include “No Deforestation, No Peat and No Exploitation” (NDPE) commitments in its financing of palm oil firms. The move by the bank, one of the largest providers of financial services to the palm oil industry, follows an investigation by environmental NGO Greenpeace, which linked it to plantation companies destroying the forests of Indonesia, the top palm oil producer. “Our rainforest is being carved up at a frightening rate and high street banks all over the world are funding this destruction,” Greenpeace Indonesia forest campaigner Annisa Rahmawati said.“Coming from the world’s sixth-largest bank, HSBC’s new policy provides impetus for the rest of the banking sector to stop financing destructive palm oil companies,” she added. In its report, Dirty Bankers, Greenpeace accused the UK-headquartered bank of marshalling $16.3 billion in financing for six companies since 2012 that have illegally cleared forests, planted oil palm trees on carbon-rich peat soil and grabbed community lands.“Its links to some of the most damaging companies in the sector leave HSBC exposed to serious reputational risk, in addition to the financial risks associated with the palm oil industry,” the report said.The investigation prompted scores of people to join a campaign to change the bank’s policies, including thousands of HSBC’s own customers.A peatland planted with oil palm burns on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra in 2015. The archipelago country’s vast peat swamp zones have been widely drained and dried by plantation firms, rendering the land susceptible to burning. The 2015 fires were the worst in decades; smoke from the blaze sickened half a million people. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerIn a statement announcing the changes, HSBC said its existing policy already made clear that it had “no interest in financing illegal operations.”But, it said, it was always willing to review its approach.“We first introduced a forest policy in 2004 and have reviewed it periodically since, further tightening the policy each time,” a bank spokesperson told Mongabay.“The 2016 High Carbon Stock Convergence Agreement between palm oil supply chain companies and NGOs, which defines a common methodology for application in the palm oil sector, has allowed us to strengthen our policy.”The new policy will require HSBC customers to commit to protecting natural forest and peatland by June 30, and provide independent verification of their own NDPE commitments by Dec. 31, 2018. The commitments extend to refiners and traders, as well as growers and mills, and customers are required to agree that HSBC may disclose that it provides them financial services. “In the short transition period before customers have to make a commitment to NDPE, HSBC will not agree new financing facilities to customers who have not made the appropriate commitment,” the statement said.HSBC told Mongabay this week that it hoped the changes would “act as a boost to the drive to sustainability – and ending the deforestation that neither we nor NGOs wish to see.”An oil palm plantation in Limbé, Cameroon. Photo by John C. Cannon for MongabayThe upgraded policy could prove vital for Indonesia, where the rate of deforestation has overtaken Brazil as land is cleared to produce the world’s most popular oil, found in everything from snack foods to cosmetics and detergents.Following HSBC’s announcement, Greenpeace wrote to other banks found to have funded destructive palm oil companies, urging them to “follow suit.”“Without a proper policy, monitoring and enforcement, it is inevitable that your bank will be financing deforestation,” the NGO warned in letters to banks including ANZ, Bank of America and Standard Chartered. Greenpeace says a crucial test for HSBC’s commitment to sustainability will be its response to the alleged plans of South Korean conglomerate POSCO Daewoo to destroy a vast area of rainforest in Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province.Recent satellite images of POSCO Daewoo subsidiary PT Bio Inti Agrindo show an estimated 4,000 hectares of rainforest crisscrossed by newly constructed roads, which Greenpeace says is a “key indicator” of imminent plantation development. According to Greenpeace, HSBC has been involved in providing POSCO Daewoo and some of its subsidiaries with significant loans.“Announcing a policy is one thing, but implementing it is another,”  Rahmawati told Mongabay, adding that HSBC should publicly cut ties with the company if it refuses to “halt this destruction.”When asked about its funding of POSCO Daewoo, HSBC said it was unable to comment on specific customers, even to confirm or deny their relationship, because of commitments to client confidentiality. However, the bank said it always investigates “credible evidence” of companies failing to comply with policies, and was “not aware of any current instances where customers are alleged to be operating outside our policy and where we have not taken, or are not taking, appropriate action.”Greenpeace warned that it will be “watching closely” to make sure HSBC delivers on its promises.Banner: An oil palm plantation on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabaycenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Downstream from a coal mine, villages in Indonesian Borneo suffer from water pollution

first_imgActivism, Coal, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Energy, Environment, Mining, Rainforests, Water, Water Pollution Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img East Kalimantan, in Indonesian Borneo, hosts rare expanses of biologically rich tropical rainforest. It also has rich deposits of coal — according to Greenpeace data, around 75 percent of the province has been assigned for coal mining.PT Indominco Mandiri, a subsidiary of Thai conglomerate Banpu, operates a 25,000-hectare (~62,000-acre) mining concession in East Kalimantan.Activists and residents say this mining operation has rendered the water of the Santan River unusable for drinking, irrigation or aquaculture. “The Santan River is the lifeblood of the people of Santan Ilir, Santan Tengah and Santan Hulu villages,” said student activist Taufik Inskander (26), sitting on the veranda of his parents’ home in Santan Ilir, in the Kutai Kartanegara district of East Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo.“This river has great historical value. Before there was a road, the people of Santan transported their agricultural products by river to be sold in Samarinda and Bontang,” explained Iskandar, who is a member of the local Marangkayu Student Association.In addition to serving as a water transportation corridor, the Santan river was also used by residents to meet their everyday needs for clean water as well as to flood their fields and fishponds. Villagers “regularly hold traditional ceremonies to honor the river and the resources,” Iskandar added.Now, Iskandar said, the people are abandoning the river because the quality of the river is deteriorating.Ever since coal mining began in the headwaters of the Santan River, local activists say the water has become turbid, muddy, and prone to flooding when there is rain.The water from Santan River “changes colors,” said Greenpeace Campaigner Bondan Andriyanu. “Sometimes it is brown, sometimes green, or yellow.”Santan river in Santan Ilir, a village surrounded by a coal mine which is owned by Banpu Public Company Ltd group in Kutai Kartanegara, East Kalimantan. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.Trouble below the surfaceEast Kalimantan hosts “incredibly rare expanse of biologically rich tropical rainforests,” according to global conservation organization The Nature Conservancy.Much of that forest is, today, under threat. Three quarters of East Kalimantan is marked out for coal mining, according to a March 2016 report by Greenpeace Southeast Asia (pdf).Among the largest coal operators in Kalimantan is PT Indo Tambangraya Megah Tbk (ITM), owned by Thai conglomerate Banpu. Including ports, the company has eight mining sites in East Kalimantan.ITM subsidiary PT Indominco Mandiri operates a 25,000-hectare (~62,000-acre) mining concession in East Kalimantan. Its mines produce 9 million tons of coal a year.It is this mining operation that activists say has rendered the water of the Santan River unusable for drinking, irrigation or aquaculture.Indominco Mandiri coal mine operation in Santan Ilir village. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.Paying the price for pollutionIskandar said that people downstream of the mine now need to purify the river water with alum before it can be safely drunk. Meanwhile further upstream, where there were no mining operations, the river water still does not need to be treated.At his home in Santan Ilir, teacher Saharuddin (who like many Indonesians uses one name) says residents now spend lots of money buying clean water from vendors who sell water from deep wells. “Last month, my school spent around 400,000 rupiah ($30) just to buy water,” he said.Saharuddin showed several dried-up fishponds across his house. The river water can no longer be used to fill the ponds, he said. Some residents are forced to buy water to keep their fish alive. “Now, fishermen looking for fish and shrimp in the water are having a hard time getting sufficient results. People don’t want to use the river water.”The people reliant on the river, from the villages of Santan Hulu, Santan Tengah and Santan Ilir, have all complained to PT Indominco Mandiri about their changing river.Taufik Iskandar, 26, a student activist from Santan Ilir village in East Kalimantan. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.“The company closes its eyes to the deteriorating quality of the Santan River. We have found documents showing that the company planned to divert the course of the river as part of a plan to increase the production of coal,” Iskandar said.However, the struggle of the student association together with the residents has borne fruit, said Greenpeace’s Andriyanu said.In a rare win against mining companies, after years of appealing to the Ministry of Forests, on Feb. 12, 2016 the permit for mining operations on local rivers were revoked.The provincial government accepted it had “failed to protect villagers,” Greenpeace reported.Despite this ceremonial win, activists say they have evidence that PT Indominco Mandiri continues to expand its mining operations on the Santan River. Satellite images and reports from villagers confirm this, Andriyanu said. When asked how can this be, he said: “That’s Indonesia!”“Coal mining companies have the ear of local government,” Andriyanu said. “So many people are targeted by corruption in relation to coal mining. They are in good positions in the provincial government.”A farmer named Azis stands near his small fish pond, polluted by coal dust and chemicals in Santan Ilir village. Photo by Ardiles Rante/Greenpeace.Defending the riverPT Indominco Mandiri did not respond to requests for comments from Mongabay. According to Greenpeace, the company has told local residents the changes in the river are due to “algae,” not expanded mining operations, but has blocked people from going upstream to investigate.Greenpeace plans to carry out soil and water testing and species counting in the affected areas, Andriyanu said. However, the organization needs to be careful not to cause trouble for local residents.Iskandar says his members of the student association have been told to cease opposition, have been forcibly moved from peaceful demonstrations and have received direct threats from PT Indominco Mandiri, as well as threats via text messages.Despite the challenges, Iskandar said villagers cannot afford to stand by and let their river become even more polluted.  “People will automatically lose their livelihoods – which is largely agricultural or from fishing and plantations that are dependent on the Santan River,” he said.“We are miserable now,” Saharuddin said. “There is no longer any clean water.”Additional reporting by Lucy EJ Woods.Editor’s Note: A reporter from Mongabay-Indonesia visited the Santan River area in August 2016 and a version of this story was first published on Mongabay’s Indonesian sister site on Sept. 8, 2016. Follow-up interviews were conducted remotely in March 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

“We don’t believe in words anymore”: Indians stand against Temer govt.

first_imgIndigenous groups control large reserves in the Amazon and have the constitutional right to more, but agribusiness and land thieves are working with the Brazilian Congress and the Temer administration to prevent recognition of new indigenous territories, and to defund FUNAI, the federal agency representing Indian concerns.In response, Brazil’s Indians are launching numerous protests. Last week more than 4,000 indigenous leaders from 200 tribes gathered in Brasilia to demonstrate. They were greeted in front of the Congress building with a police teargas attack.Emboldened by government support, ranchers and their hired gunmen brutally attacked a peaceful land occupation by members of the Gamela tribe in Maranhão state in northern Brazil on 30 April with rifles and machetes; 13 Indians were seriously injured.In the Amazon, the Munduruku have blocked the Transamazonian highway, creating a 40 kilometer backup of trucks loaded with the soy harvest. In an unusual twist, the truckers met with the Munduruku Wednesday afternoon and expressed solidarity with the Indians, agreeing that the government’s failure to meet the people’s needs is the real problem. Standoff: A Munduruku woman at the Transamazonian highway blockade talks with truck drivers. Despite the inconvenience of the roadblock, many truckers are expressing sympathy for the indigenous protest, citing their own disgruntlement with the policies of the Temer government. Photo by Mauricio TorresThe Munduruku roadblock has created a 40 kilometer (25 mile) backup. Photo by Mauricio Torres(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read this article in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)Indigenous groups are making a defiant stand against the current wave of fiercely anti-Indian policies being rapidly implemented by Brazil’s Temer administration and Congress.Protests blossomed last week in Brasilia where a four-day demonstration — the largest in the nation’s history — brought together over 4,000 indigenous leaders from more than 200 tribes seeking government redress of grievances. The protesters were met with teargas.Likewise, a peaceful land occupation by members of the Gamela tribe in Maranhão state ended in violence when their camp was raided by ranchers and hired gunmen who beat the Indians brutally, even hacking off hands with machetes.In the Amazon, members of the Munduruku tribe, armed with bows and arrows, set up a roadblock on the Transamazonian highway, creating a 40 kilometer (25 mile) backup of trucks loaded with this year’s soy harvest.The blockade came in protest of the government’s refusal to demarcate the Indians’ lands as assured under the 1988 Brazilian Constitution. The commodities roadblock also sent a clear signal to the bancada ruralista, Brazil’s agribusiness lobby, which dominates Congress and the administration, and which pushed for the dramatic upsurge in federal initiatives rolling back indigenous land rights and protections.A glimpse of the traffic backup at the Munduruku blockade. Video by Mauricio TorresViolence in MaranhãoOn 30 April gunmen and ranchers attacked an indigenous camp in Maranhão, an impoverished state in northeast Brazil, long dominated by powerful landowners led by the Sarney family (one of whom is Pres. Temer’s environment minister, José Sarney Filho).The violence was triggered by events two days earlier, when several dozen Gamela Indians occupied disputed land near the town of Viana, 214 kilometers (133 miles) from the state capital of São Luis.This land was traditionally occupied by the Gamela, but the military dictatorship (1964-1985) illegally ejected them from it. Ranchers then occupied the area, clearing the forest, planting pasture and raising cattle. As years passed, the ranchers began to see themselves as the legitimate owners.About 300 Gamela families remained in the region, however, determined to regain their land despite the slight odds of doing so. Regardless of the legitimacy of their claim, the Indians received little help from authorities, with the federal Indian agency FUNAI, under pressure from the ranchers, refusing to begin the process of marking out the boundaries of the Gamela territory.Three years ago the Indians went to court to force the ranchers to relinquish the land, but the case was stalled by bureaucratic delays. With their living conditions worsening year-by-year, the Gamela became convinced that they would only survive as a people if they took action. So they began a series of retomadas or re-occupations of their traditional land.They timed the latest reoccupation to coincide with both the indigenous protest in Brasilia and a national one-day general strike, the first in 21 years, organized by Brazil’s trade unions in protest over the Temer government’s severe austerity measures.A cell phone photo taken just before the attack on the Gamela camp, showing a police car and group of ranchers. Photo courtesy of CimiIt was a risky strategy, particularly in view of the strong anti-indigenous sentiment in Brasilia, and the local ranchers responded rapidly. According to one report, they sent out a WhatsApp message, calling on ranchers and their gunmen to gather near the indigenous camp.Messages supporting the ranchers flooded the media. Federal deputy, Aluisio Guimarães Mendes Filho, (the state’s Public Security Secretary during the government of Roseana Sarney, another member of the Sarney clan), spoke out in a local radio interview, accusing the Gamela of being “troublemakers” and encouraging violence against them.“He fanned the flames,” said one Indian later.The ranchers had a barbecue, drank a lot of alcohol, and became increasingly abusive in their talk about the Indians. It was clear that an attack was being planned, but when it happened, the military police (who had arrived on site earlier) didn’t intervene.The Indians were vastly out-numbered and could do little but flee into the forest when attacked by men wielding rifles and machetes.According to Cimi (the Catholic Missionary Council), 13 Indians were injured. Two had both hands lopped off. Others were severely beaten; one had a fractured skull. One of the injured is Kum ‘Tum Gamela, a former priest, who has received numerous death threats in the past.One of the wounded Gamela in hospital. Photo courtesy of Ana Mendes / CimiThe Ministry of Justice issued a press statement in which it promised to investigate “the incident that involved small farmers and supposed Indians in the hamlet of Bahias.” The term “supposed” generated a wave of indigenous anger and was quickly deleted from the statement. Later the term “small farmers” was also removed, as it was widely criticized as being a euphemism for the gunmen employed by the ranchers. In the end, the statement merely said that that the ministry would investigate a “rural conflict.”The Human Rights Commission of the prestigious Brazilian Bar Association (OAB) is to request help from the human rights body, Amnesty International, to resolve the dispute.Munduruku roadblockAnother serious conflict is still underway, though it has not, as yet, resulted in violence. On 28 April, 130 Munduruku Indians and members of the Tapajós riverside communities of Montanha and Mongabal blockaded the Transamazonian highway, occupying a bridge about 25 kilometers (15 miles) east of the new port of Miritituba, a key transhipment point for the soy industry, where international trading giants, such as Bunge and ADM, have large terminals.With the soy harvest in full swing, the road soon became highly congested, with at least a 40 kilometer (25 mile) backup of large trucks, carrying soybeans to Miritituba. The blockade was lifted during the night from 28 April forward, but was then re-imposed as a 24-hour blockade on the morning of 3 May.A Mongabay contributor was accidentally caught up in the traffic, and on arriving at the road block he stayed to cover the showdown.The Munduruku blocked the Transamazonian highway this week in protest of the failure of the Brazilian government to demarcate their traditional lands. The blockade is ongoing. Photo by Mauricio TorresAntonio Munduruku, a young Indian, told Mongabay two reasons why the blockade was imposed: “We want the FUNAI employees who were working with us to be reinstated. We need them. They are our greatest tool in getting our lands marked out. And we won’t leave with empty hands. The FUNAI president told us on Friday that he’d sorted it out. But we don’t believe in words any more. We want their reinstatement published in the official gazette.”He went on: “The second reason is to get the Sawré Muybu indigenous territory properly marked out. It’s our land but nothing is happening. Loggers are carrying on extracting timber.”Vicente Saw, an old cacique, leader, said that stopping traffic on highways was effective: “The heart of the government is here on the road,” he said.Munduruku men and women stood together at the roadblock. Photo by Mauricio TorresThe will to resistThe Munduruku were shocked but not surprised by what happened to the Gamela: “They’re a different ethnic group but they are our brothers, with the same blood,” said Jairo Saw Munduruku. “We mustn’t let what’s happened to them happen to us. The government must mark out our land. If not, big loggers, big mining companies, will come in. And they will start conflicts, attacking us, assassinating leaders. That’s what the government wants but we must stop it happening. We don’t have anyone speaking for us in Congress. We have to defend ourselves.” Attempts by Mongabay to reach the Brazilian government for comment in recent weeks have been met with no response.The Munduruku feel no hostility toward the truck drivers. An old indigenous leader, Tomas Munduruku, said: “We’re in favor of the truck drivers. They need our support too. It’s not right that the government is cutting their pensions.”More surprisingly perhaps, many of the truck drivers are supportive of the Indians too. Trucker Mario de Nascimento said: “This road is essential for Brazil and the protest must stop. But the Indians’ rights aren’t being respected, just like ours aren’t being respected. But we are carrying Brazil on our backs. We can’t stop. We need the government to sort it out. None of us deserves the way we’re being treated.”Another trucker, who didn’t want to give his name, said: “They [the Indians] are right. You can’t deny that. And if some of the people here want to lynch me for saying that, then let them lynch me.”David and Goliath: One truck driver threatened to drive over the Indians, but other truckers found common ground with the Munduruku in their grievances against the repression and austerity measures of the current government. Photo by Mauricio TorresTime and again, the truckers, like the Indians, blamed the government for failing to listen, declaring flatly: “The biggest problem is the government.”The concern is that the Amazonian heat, hunger and thirst will affect both Indians and truck drivers, and that tempers may begin to fray. One truck driver, who also didn’t give his name, threatened: “We’re going to drive our trucks over the Indians, pushing them all over, Indian after Indian. If our dreadful federal government doesn’t manage to get the blockade lifted soon, that’s what we’ll do.”Another trucker said, in exasperated jest: “It’s getting terrible for all of us. I haven’t had a shower for more than 24 hours, in this heat. I feel like throwing my underpants into the river. They’d kill the fish. So the Indians wouldn’t have fish to eat, nor any of us have fish either.”With the drivers stretched over many miles, it’s difficult to assess the truckers’ overall mood, but there was a surprising development Wednesday afternoon. A substantial group of truckers and Indians held a meeting beside the highway, during which both sides expressed support for the other’s struggle, saying that their chief complaint is against the current government.Although not all truckers share this opinion, a significant number do. That is an extraordinary new development because, in the past, Indian actions of this type caused huge resentment among affected parties, particularly truck drivers. It is indicative of the very high level of rejection in Brazil of the ruling government by voters of all kinds, with Pres. Temer’s support now standing at an unprecedented low of 9 percent.The Munduruku possess a fierce warrior heritage and are standing up against the anti-indigenous policies of the administration and Congress. Photo by Mauricio TorresGrowing dissentProtests in Maranhão and Pará are not isolated cases. All over Brazil Indians are expressing grave fears about the future. Paulo Marubo, an Indian from the Javari Valley in the state of Amazonas, not far from the border with Peru, says that FUNAI, decimated by budget cuts, will have to close many of its offices for ethno-environmental protection (Bapes), which play a key role in monitoring the territory occupied by uncontacted tribes.Marubo told Survival International: “If the protection teams are withdrawn, it will be like before, when many Indians were massacred and died as a result of disease… If the loggers come here, they will want to contact the uncontacted, they will spread diseases and even kill them.”Instead, the federal government seems to be turning its back on indigenous demands. During his first 55 days in office, justice minister Osmar Serraglio didn’t have a single meeting with an Indian but found time to sit down behind closed doors with a 100 landowners plus businessmen accused of corruption in the Car-Wash scandal.During the large protest in Brasilia, Serraglio and Eliseu Padilha, Temer’s chief-of-staff, belatedly offered to meet the Indians, but that offer was turned down. The two officials are known to have drawn up the government’s anti-indigenous strategy and, with no offer of compromise on the table, the indigenous leaders saw little point in meeting with them.The current assault on indigenous rights is the most severe since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985. The NGO ISA (Socioenvironmental Institute) says there has been an “exponential increase in rural violence” since Temer took over. It comments: “The fact that the ministry of justice is occupied by [Osmar Serraglio], an advocate of injustice reinforces the sinister omens of what lies ahead.”(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read this article in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Munduruku warriors at the roadblock. Photo by Mauricio Torres Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

China flexes its new climate action muscles in Bonn; Trump administration blinks

first_imgAt the United Nation’s mid-year climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Chai Qimin, director of international cooperation at the Chinese government’s National Center for Climate Change Strategy, joined other diplomats in warning the U.S. against pulling out of Paris.Chai and others firmly suggested that retribution in the form of trade deals, a carbon tariff, and possibly even military access would be on the table when the U.S. attends international forums such as the upcoming G7 and G20 summits, according Climate Change News.In an apparent reaction to the warnings from Chinese representatives and others, Trump administration officials have canceled a meeting in Washington, D.C., scheduled for today, in which the fate of the U.S. and the Paris agreement was to be discussed, Reuters reported. Flexing new muscles as the undisputed leader in global climate action, China is making it clear that if the Trump Administration follows through on its threat to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, there will be an angry international backlash and a tangible geopolitical price to pay.In an apparent reaction to warnings from Chinese representatives and others issued on Monday, May 8, at the opening of the United Nation’s mid-year climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Trump administration officials have canceled a meeting in Washington, D.C., scheduled for today, in which the fate of the U.S. and the Paris agreement was to be discussed, Reuters reported.In Bonn, Chai Qimin, director of international cooperation at the Chinese government’s National Center for Climate Change Strategy, joined other diplomats in warning the U.S. against pulling out of Paris. He and others firmly suggested that retribution in the form of trade deals, a carbon tariff, and possibly even military access would be on the table when the U.S. attends international forums such as the upcoming G7 and G20 summits, according to Climate Change News.“Definitely it will impact on other diplomatic arenas, already on G7 and G20, the Major Economies Forum as well,” Chai said. “President Xi (Jinping) and our ambassador to the United Nations have said several times that withdrawing from the Paris Agreement is irresponsible, which will harm the mutual trust in the multilateral mechanism.”In Trump’s “America first” campaign, he promised a host of moves that he said would bolster U.S. strength, create domestic jobs, and let the rest of the world shoulder more of the financial burden for military protection. But campaign promises have given way to political reality since Trump has taken office. He is now for NATO, not against it, for example, and he is now rethinking NAFTA, not tearing it up, as he had previously pledged to do.The Obama administration was instrumental in bringing China into the climate action fold in 2014, which led to the historic Paris Agreement in late 2015. That’s when 196 nations pledged for the first time ever to voluntarily reduce their carbon emissions to stem the worst effects of climate change by 2100.Undeterred by the Trump Administration’s climate change denialism or the threat to withdraw from the climate accord, every other signatory nation plans to move forward with meeting the voluntary carbon reduction pledges adopted as part of the Paris Agreement.There is reportedly significant disagreement within the Trump administration over a withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, which would take four years to accomplish — longer than Trump’s first term. Major U.S. corporations, even some fossil fuel companies, have urged the U.S. to stand by the agreement.Paula Caballero, global director of the World Resources Institute’s climate program, said in a conference call last week attended by Mongabay: “Those urging (Trump) to withdraw from the agreement have manufactured a misleading debate over whether the terms agreed to in Paris could be used to challenge the administration’s (reduced) plans on climate change. This legal infighting is a tactic to cover what is at its heart a purely political decision.“We firmly believe that weakening the U.S. commitment to climate action is foolhardy and would itself undercut American interests. It would erode trust and undermine U.S. standing internationally on a host of U.S. interests — from trade to national security. And most importantly, on the economic front, it would leave America behind while other countries are benefiting from the huge economic opportunities we are seeing around the world in transitions to cleaner economies.”At the 2016 mid-year UN climate conference in Bonn, participants were greeted by a triumphant photo taken after the signing of the historic Paris Agreement in December 2015. The United States is currently the only country considering backing out of the agreement. Photo by Justin Catanoso.Justin Catanoso, a regular contributor to Mongabay, is a professor of journalism at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. Find him on Twitter: @jcatanoso.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Climate Change, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, Environment, Environmental Politics, Global Warming, Politics Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

TG take third after 3-2 win over Arnett

first_imgAn inspired performance from Jermaine ‘Teddy’ Johnson, who had a brilliant solo goal and an assist, carried Tivoli Gardens to a come-from-behind 3-2 win over arch-rivals Arnett Gardens in yesterday’s Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) match at the Edward Seaga Sports Complex.Newton Sterling, who got both goals for the ‘Junglists’, opened the scoring after just three minutes. However, goals from Mitchily Waul (26th), Barrington Pryce (31st) put the hosts ahead before the break. Then 13 minutes after the interval, Johnson added a third. But Sterling grabbed his second 10 minutes from time to make it a nervy finish for the home team.The win lifted Tivoli one place to third, with 26 points, three behind UWI, who slammed Portmore 4-1, and they are five points adrift of leaders Montego Bay United, who defeated Maverley-Hughenden 1-0. Arnett stay sixth on 19 points.At the Edward Seaga Complex, the game started very open and, after three minutes, Sterling stunned the home crowd with a header from six yards. Ajuma Johnson wasted a great chance to level for Tivoli minutes later, but moments after, Waul turned home Johnson’s drive across goal to tie the game. The home crowd was still celebrating the equaliser when Pryce rose to head home a corner at the near post.In the second half, Johnson, who had bust-ups with former Tivoli defender Ranike Anderson, and Jason Moore, later reminded why he was one of the most admiring local players of his generation with a vintage strike.last_img read more

WCD couple assaulted, robbed by armed teen bandits

first_imgA Mary, West Coast Demerara (WCD) couple is now traumatised after they were attacked by a group of teen bandits and robbed while enjoying an evening stroll in Mary on Monday.The couple, 27-year-old Patricia Stephens and her husband, 30-year-old Mark Stephens, went to a Chinese restaurant located in the community and were walking home at about 21:20h when the incident occurred.Guyana Times understands that a group of four teens, two of which were on bicycles, began following them for about 10 minutes.“We didn’t take it for anything, because we said is just some boys liming but then I keep looking back because they were behind us for a good while,” Patricia Stephens told this publication.According to the woman, her husband urged her to walk faster but as the couple was a few houses from their home, the teens also quickened their pace and pounced on them.“We walking fast and like they realise that we suspect them and the two on bicycles first ride pass we and parked and the other two come up from behind,” the woman revealed.After being cornered, Mark Stephens attempted to accost one of the bandits but it was at this time that one of the teens whipped out a knife from his waist.“He tell my husband loose he or I gone stab you so my husband end up loose he. They then tell we that we must hand over all the money that we have and I must give up my gold chain if I know what good for me. I got so afraid that I give them all that I had,” the victim related.However, while robbing the male victim, one of the perpetrators slapped him to his face and reportedly told him “don’t play no bad man here”.The teens escaped with just over $40,000, a gold chain which was worth $75,000 along with two cellphones with a combined estimated value of $175,000.The couple visited the police station where they reported the matter. The robbery is being investigated.last_img read more

ExxonMobil makes 13th discovery offshore Guyana

first_imgGuyana’s principal explorer, ExxonMobil has made its 13th discovery offshore Guyana at the Yellowtail-1 well.It was only two months ago that the US supermajor made double oil discoveries at the Tilapia-1 and Haimara-1 well in the South-west section of the Stabroek Block.Yellowtail-1, located some six miles North-west of the Tilapia discovery, encountered approximately 292 feet of high quality oil bearing sandstone reservoir.According to a press release from ExxonMobil, it was drilled to a depth of 18,445 feet (5622 meters) in 6046 feet (1843 meters) of water.The Noble Tom Madden began drilling the Yellowtail well on March 27 and it will next drill the Hammerhead-2 well.This latest discovery adds to the previously announced estimated recoverable resource of approximately 5.5 billion oil-equivalent barrels on the Stabroek Block. Yellowtail-1 is the fifth discovery in the Turbot area, which ExxonMobil expects to become a major development hub.Mike Cousins, senior Vice President of ExxonMobil Exploration and New Ventures, stated “Our success here can be attributed to our industry-leading upstream capabilities, the strength of our partnerships and our ongoing commitment to growing Guyana’s offshore potential.”Meanwhile, the US-oil giant said exploration and development activities continue at other locations on the Stabroek Block. The Stena Carron is currently completing a well test at the Longtail-1 discovery and upon completion will next drill the Hammerhead-3 well. Later in 2019, the Stena Carron will drill a second well at the Ranger discovery.The Noble Bob Douglas drillship is currently completing development drilling operations for the Liza Phase 1 development. ExxonMobil is also evaluating plans to add another exploration drillship, bringing the number of drillships offshore Guyana to four.ExxonMobil has previously said there is potential for at least five floating productions, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessels on the Stabroek Block producing more than 750,000 barrels of oil per day by 2025.Startup of the Liza Phase 1 development is on track to begin by the first quarter of 2020 and will produce up to 120,000 barrels of oil per day utilising the Liza Destiny FPSO, which is expected to arrive in the country in the third quarter.Liza Phase 2 is expected to startup by mid-2022. A final investment decision is expected soon, subject to Government and regulatory approvals. Upon approval, the project plans to use the Liza Unity FPSO to produce up to 220,000 barrels per day. Sanctioning of a third development, Payara, is also expected in 2019, with startup projected for 2023.The Stabroek Block is 6.6 million acres (26,800 square kilometers). ExxonMobil affiliate, Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited, is operator and holds 45 per cent interest in the Stabroek Block. Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd holds 30 per cent interest and CNOOC Petroleum Guyana Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of CNOOC Limited, holds 25 per cent interest.ExxonMobil, the largest publicly traded international energy company, uses technology and innovation to help meet the world’s growing energy needs. ExxonMobil holds an industry-leading inventory of resources, is one of the largest refiners and marketers of petroleum products, and its chemical company is one of the largest in the world.last_img read more

Fort Nelson application to join North Peace Hockey League denied

first_imgFort Nelson Yeti President Ryan Carter admits he wasn’t surprised by the outcome. He says the team will now focus on scheduling exhibition games for the upcoming season and put in a bid to host the Coy Cup.“The vote was secret ballot so we weren’t given feedback on the outcome of the vote. I think it was a little bit better than last time but obviously not successful. It isn’t surprising to us so we’re going to do what we did last year. We’ll do exhibition games and we’re putting in a bid to host the Coy Cup in Fort Nelson as well for this year.” The team may look to join other leagues for the 2015/2016 season but for now won’t be putting forward other proposals as originally planned.- Advertisement -“We might do that in the future. Hopefully with a bit more time this summer for scheduling we can get more games and hopefully we’re successful in getting the Coy Cup here,” Carter says. “Maybe we’ll look at our options next summer for looking at other leagues.”The Yeti expect to find out about their Coy Cup bid in December.last_img read more

Lazio rule out move for Manchester United star

first_img Manchester United striker Robin van Persie 1 Lazio have ruled out a move for Manchester United striker Robin van Persie.The Serie A club’s sporting director Igli Tare claims the Dutchman is “outside our parameters”.Van Persie, who is tied to United for another season, was spotted in Rome this week, leading to speculation that the 31-year-old could join Lazio.“On Van Persie, all I can say is that I respect him as a striker but unfortunately, he is outside our parameters,” Tare told Lazio Style Radio. “There has never been a meeting, this is gossip, not transfer news.“We don’t want to create illusions, this is not true.”The former Arsenal forward has also been linked with a move to Champions League finalists Juventus.last_img

‘TRADE AND UPGRADE’ AT DIVER’S HYUNDAI THIS WEEKEND

first_imgBUSINESS: Diver’s Hyundai Garage are hosting an Open Weekend on Saturday and Sunday, and a large crowd is expected to descend on the popular car retailer as car sales of Hyundai continue to rocket. Terence Diver, ownwer of Diver’s Hyundai, told Donegal Daly, “I would like to take this opportunity to welcome everyone to Hyundai’s National Open Weekend this Saturday and Sunday at our premises on Canal Road, Letterkenny, when we launch the 162 Reg. “It’s exciting times to say the least here in Hyundai in Letterkenny and nationwide.” The brand has just gone from strength to strength and we are confident this trend will continue into the future.“We have carried out major renovation works to our premises in recent times and are about to embark on the next phase in the coming months.“I would also like to thank you for playing your part in making the all new Hyundai Tucson the No.1 Best Selling car in Donegal and Ireland. “Since its launch it has just taken the country by storm so suffice to say ‘’Change is Good’’. Today Saturday and tomorrow Sunday our sales team are looking forward to meeting you and answering any queries you may have in relation to purchasing a car.”162 DL 4 U: It’s back, yes, Hyundai’s Trade and Upgrade is back and it’s available for the month of June at our premises.By trading in your current car you can avail of 5 years ‘FREE SERVICING’’ or up to €4,000 scrappage bonus on your existing vehicle. This weekend come along and view our range and talk to our team.Affordable Finance Packages:At Divers we have affordable Finance Packages to suit everyone including PCP (Personal Contract Plan) the new way of financing your car. This plan ensures that customers have trouble free motoring and peace of mind for the duration of the plan at an affordable cost. Looking Good: Terence added, “Thank you for your feedback on the renovations that we have carried out in recent months at our premises to make your experience at Divers Hyundai more comfortable and enjoyable.Call in this weekend and see for yourself why more and more people are choosing Hyundai…..’’Change is Good’’….’’Believe everything you hear’.”‘TRADE AND UPGRADE’ AT DIVER’S HYUNDAI THIS WEEKEND was last modified: May 26th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BusinessDiver’s HyundaiFeaturesgaragenewsOpen weekendlast_img read more