Coke: “It was seen that LaLiga would take action”

first_imgHow the movie has changed with the coronavirus …Yes, it is logical too. We see that there are Champions League games that are being played behind closed doors and it was seen coming a bit that LaLiga would take preventive measures. Because it is clear that if you take it, at least you will be a couple of weeks in quarantine. Not only for us who play soccer, but anyone for health reasons. In Mestalla it was already played behind closed doors, what do you think of this type of measures?I understand that in the end it is for the common good, for the social good. But obviously the sports spectacle because it diminishes it and with what was played Valencia was going to suffer it, it was clear.Derby behind closed doors or suspension …I think he had never played a game behind closed doors. It would be strange. But I think it would affect them more than it affects us. Because in the end it is his field, his audience, who also experience it in a special way for being a derby. A certain percentage that we would earn there I think …If they play, what do you expect from the match?Well, I think we have to go out and do our job. I think they have a great team and I don’t know how the wear of the Champions League will have affected them in a decisive match for them. The first part of the journey is the way to go; But of course, then they play well and even if they don’t have their best game they have players who make the difference, with which you have to play a very complete game.Would you imagine achieving the first victory in Mestalla without an audience?It was going to be remembered because there will not be an audience, because it would not be bad if this were the first to be won there. We are aware of this and hopefully the truth would be very nice.His passage through the derbies in Valencia are not understood without that goal annulled by the push of Paulista. It could have been the first joy in Mestalla (it was 1-2 in the final stretch of the match in 2017-18).That’s it … He was wrong at the time and what are you going to do. We all wanted to bump our heads against the wall because the situation of the team was complicated. Also, it was 1-2, I think it would be the seventy minute, or that way, you were already ahead. But hey, at that moment you get very angry about everything that involved, also in a derby. But, well, that’s it. Hopefully we can put 1-2 in the seventies this time.With VAR the story would have changed …Man, if they don’t cancel that with VAR, imagine … And in full Fallas …I couldn’t come another time. Nor can they prohibit people from going out on the street, that is impossible. But I think we all have to put a little common sense, and not stay locked up at home, but we do avoid certain things …center_img Being one of the heavyweights in the group, how do you assess the situation of the team?Look, the other day, I don’t know if it was Guardiola, he said that in Champions it is very difficult to be superior to your rival for a long time and that you have to take advantage of it. The same thing happens to us, we are not much superior to many First Division teams. The other day you have to make it 2-0, you don’t and obviously the other team is going to have its moment. It is true that it can be said that we are not very regular. But what is to be regular, to win all the matches? It is true that the other day you have to make it 2-0 and the game would have been much more controlled; you don’t and in any move they can tie you. But I see the team well, especially I think that we have grown from the beginning of the season to here and it is more reliable in terms of game. The disposition of the team in the matches is very recognizable and I think the team competes against anyone and in almost any match. Maybe some of the things haven’t turned out, but I think the dynamics are good.Miramón would arrive touched to the meeting, do you see yourself with options to be a starter?Well, I do not know. I train every week thinking that I am going to play, in order to help the team. I do not think further, because in the end you are training every day to that end. You have to play or you do not. You have to work and then since the decision is up to the coach.How do you personally face your role this season?Well, it’s true that I’m not playing much. But I still feel important in the team, I think respected and considered by all my teammates, because I think we have a great group. Now it is true that I am in a situation where I do not play much, but I think I have to continue to contribute things every day in training and face games in a slightly different way. But I always try to help, contribute my experiences if they can be useful to a partner and when I have to play try to do well.How does the player coexist with criticism when he is not at his best?You first have to be aware of the world you are in. You are exposed to public opinion and many times your work is determined based on whether you win a game or lose. Not even for your personal or team performances. From there, criticism does not have to harm you mentally and always try to maintain a line and a spirit towards work and what you should do. Neither for good nor for bad.Without being his best season in sports, on a personal level he is in a sweet moment …Obviously, on a personal level it is one of the happiest moments. Enjoying this process a lot (he will soon be a father). And it is true that I am not playing and I do not know if with age you learn to relativize everything a little. You cannot base your life and happiness in quotes, because you don’t play. I spend it every day here training you to shit. I enjoy day to day a lot, traveling with my colleagues, in my life I am of course enjoying it a lot and if I played it would be milk … But you have to relativize everything and you cannot lose that you are in a good time or you are happy or joyful because you play or don’t play.With the number of laps he has taken in his career and he is going to have a Valencian son …Yes, the truth is (laughs). And, look, my girlfriend is from Cádiz, I wouldn’t mind if she was from Cádiz, and I was from Madrid. Well look, the truth that we are here at ease, with which in a place where you are at ease because everything that happens to you, and on top of that, it will be good.last_img read more

Colombia’s cane industry efficient but potentially damaging

first_imgAgriculture, Deforestation, Farming, Forestry, Forests, Monocultures Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img About 80 percent of all sugar cane in Colombia is concentrated in the Pacific coastal state of Valle del Cauca, and cane represents 50 percent of all local agricultural production.The Afro-Colombian population in the area surrounding the state’s capital city of Cali has seen a heavy impact on their traditional farming practices and the local environment.The monoculture production of cane has led to deforestation, impacting the health of local flora and fauna, according to research. CALI, Colombia – Colombia’s Pacific coast state of Valle del Cauca, home to at least 80 percent of the country’s booming sugar cane industry, continues to rebound after excessive and damaging rains in 2011-2012. In fact, recent USDA Foreign Agricultural Services report found that the country’s cane industry continues to reach “historical averages.”The rebound isn’t good news for everyone, though: there have long been environmental and social complications from the industry’s success.Within Valle del Cauca, cane cultivation is a major part of the local economy. The Association of Sugar Cane Cultivators of Colombia (Asocaña) notes that over 50 percent of all local agricultural production is devoted to cane. Domestic sugar cooperative CIAMSA ranks Colombia, which also produces a variety of different kinds of sugar, among the top four most efficient cane industries in the world. The climate is suitable for year round cultivation, so Colombia grows more tons per hectare than most other nations. It is the second largest global producer of both panela (unrefined whole cane sugar) and ethanol – an alcohol fuel distilled from plant materials such as corn and sugar.But over centuries of production, some 225,000 hectares (over 540,000 acres) in Valle del Cauca have been converted to cane. Today producers have nowhere left to expand says Arche Advisors, a U.S.-based firm that specializes in corporate responsibility. Their research shows that even industry specialists acknowledge that there are no expansion possibilities. Arche notes that investors are being urged to increase productivity in other ways, including better technology or switching to ethanol production.Area residents have long been critical of production practices, which they say have impacted local sustainable farming practices. In interviews, these residents said that the cane industry in the Valle de Cauca has taken over entire swaths of land that were once diverse forest regions. In the area surrounding the state’s capital city of Cali, the Afro-Colombian population – already among the country’s most vulnerable – has been heavily impacted.“[We] were once the owners of this area, the flat region of the Cauca Valley, which is over 220,000 hectares,” said Weimar Possu Diaz, an elderly local resident of Puerto Tejada. The town is 98 percent Afro-Colombian and just 45 minutes from Cali.  “The cañeros (cane producers) came here and took the land away.”Weimar’s sister, Darly Possu Diaz, says that area residents used to engage in more sustainable practices that were disrupted by cane growth.“We used to have a traditional farm that was a permanent forest,” she said. “The cane has finished us here.”Darly describes their traditional farm as a place where fruit and other staple goods such as plantains were grown, a practice still maintained by many small-holding farmers, particularly in the mountains. Darly’s farm and others like it have long provided sustenance for growers and a harvest of products such as cacao to sell at local markets.Her memories are vivid: Darly recalls a time when she could eat various tropical fruits from local trees and watch monkeys playing close to her home. But on a 45-minute drive through the area from Cali to Puerto Tejada, all that could be seen were cane fields, with few trees in sight.Local residents buy produce from the local market. Photo by Kimberley BrownMultiple organizations note that large-scale agriculture has historically been a leading cause of deforestation in Colombia, including UK-based Earth Innovation Institute and Colombia’s Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development. Other major causes have included illicit crop cultivation (such as coca) or mining.In the Valle del Cauca, this deforestation has happened largely through the clear cutting to make room for sugarcane.Cane monoculture maintenance has also caused problems in the Valle del Cauca. Chemical sprays commonly used in cane cultivation (such as the herbicide glyphosate) have killed off local flora, said Irene Valez Torres, an associate professor of environmental engineering at the University of Valle in Cali, in an interview. A 2016 study by the Research Group on Orchids, Ecology and Plant Systematics at the National University of Colombia noted that glyphosate spraying near Cali’s cane fields resulted in the early death of nearby orchids.Locals have also reported that the spraying of sugarcane fields caused permanent damage to their crops.“When the cañeros arrived, they fumigated our crops and dried them up with the spray that they applied to the cane,” said Nancy Diaz Hidalgo from her home in Puerto Tejada. “It was too strong for our crops. That ended our traditional farms.”Local residents riding a horse a carriage through Puerto Tejada, still a common form of transportation in the area. Photo by Kimberely BrownThe government-run Colombian Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology, and Environmental Studies (IDEAM) did not respond to numerous requests for comment. But most recently available figures from IDEAM show that deforestation in Colombia increased by 16 percent between 2013 and 2014. That puts Colombia’s 10 percent share of global biodiversity at risk under the guidelines of the Convention on Biological Diversity.Other impactsResearchers have long warned of the broader social impacts that deforestation and monocultures can have on local communities, including international non-profit Oxfam. The organization said in a 2014 report that monoculture expansion in general was responsible for “displacing communities, undermining smallholder livelihoods and worsening local food security.” They added that this tends to happen in already marginalized areas.Based on Weimar’s account, that research is on par with his experience in Puerto Tejada.“The most displaced in this country have been the black community, because unfortunately where they have been is also where natural resources have been,” he said.Historical photograph of Puerto Tejada from the early 1900’s, showing the local Afro-Colombian population spreading cacao that they had harvested from their own fields. Photo provided by local resident Weimar Possu DiazIn Puerto Tejada and the region around Cali, cane cultivation expanded into territory that once belonged to Afro-Colombian communities, who had long lived off subsistence agriculture and rotational crops of coffee and cacao. The National Centre of Historical Memory notes that this was the basis of the local Afro-Colombian economy after slavery ended.“Cacao was the base of the black economy in the north of the valley floor of the Valle del Cauca…they sold the cacao themselves, had their own resources… and worked together with their family,” Weimar said. “It was a strong economy.”The loss of a sustainable economic base has had a lasting impact on Afro-Colombian populations, as they continue to be among the most poor and marginalized in the country.  In a 2005 census report by the UNHCR, the U.N.’s refugee body, at least 15 percent of Afro-Colombians were found to have nothing to eat one or more days a week – more than twice Colombia’s national average.“These industries took away the inheritance that our grandparents were going to leave us,” Darly said, who pointed out the vast unemployment and poverty she says she’s personally aware of among her neighbors. “These lands do not belong to the industries, these lands are our ancestors.”Diana Nocua, a Colombian human rights worker with the National Commission of Human Rights, says that some of the most unequal states in the country are along the Pacific coast. Nocua noted that some communities in the region don’t have proper access to water, healthcare or education.“Everything is cane fields,” Nocua said in an interview, noting that the Valle del Cauca presents specific problems vis-à-vis agriculture.“This monoculture destroyed the farmers’ own economy.”Benefits vs. harmThe cane industry has long denied any significant negative social impacts, noting that they have brought more benefits to Colombian society than harm. That message has been echoed in local media coverage.A 2013 article in domestic newspaper El Pais described the sector as “essential,” and noted that the area’s 20,000 sugar mills employ some 1.7 million people across the country.“Entire communities depend on (cane) cultivation,” the article states.Puerto Tejada residents discussing politics on their front porch. From left to right: Alexander Alvarez, Weimar Possu Diaz, Nancy Possu Diaz with granddaughter on her lap. Photo by Kimberely BrownIn December 2016, El Pais also reported the positive effects that sugar production has had on the state’s overall economy. The article notes that sugar production, exports and construction were the top three reasons for GDP increase in the Valle del Cauca over the second half of 2016 – 3.6 percent from June to September, and 2.3 percent from October to December. These numbers are also well above national growth, which only saw a 1.2 percent rise in GDP in the third trimester of 2016.EthanolIn recent years, Colombia’s cane industry has grown in response to the push to increase ethanol production, which the government is looking to as a first step in breaking its dependence on fossil fuels.This expansion has been aided by government incentives, including a 2001 law mandating that gasoline must be mixed with 8-10 percent (depending on the state) biofuel. The former conservative administration of Alvaro Uribe that ended in 2010 also championed the ethanol industry and incentivized it through tax exemptions, special loans and increased access to land for ethanol producers.But several international research and advocacy organizations say that it’s questionable whether ethanol — and the cane industry at large — can really be considered sustainable.Cane production requires an immense amount of water. During a typical growing period, sugar cane needs anywhere from roughly 59-98 inches (1500-2500 mm) of water, more than any other crop, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agricultural Organization. In contrast, crops like barley, oats and wheat only require 17-26 inches (450-650 mm) of water in a growing period. Secondly, studies by Oxfam, the UN, and the Washington Office on Latin America note that the ethanol industry has been accused of violating labor rights. Oxfam also points to what they consider to be inadequate labor regulations.But based on information published by Asocaña, which represents Colombia’s sugar sector both nationally and internationally, damage to the environment is an exception and not a rule of the cane industry.Asocaña did not respond to inquiries for comment for this story, but the organization is one of several in the biofuel sector that have pledged to expand cane production without causing further deforestation. They also say they’ve developed programs to reverse some of the damage already done.In a 2012 annual review, Asocaña reported that between Dec. of 2011 and Dec. of 2012 alone, over 3,225 hectares of land benefited from their “reforestation, conservation and protection” projects. This happened even with a 15.7 percent increase in ethanol production in the same time period, the report states.Environmental policiesThe current administration of Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos recently implemented key strategies to tackle deforestation under the umbrella of plans for addressing the country’s high carbon emissions. These include the Colombian Strategy for Low-Carbon Development and a plan to achieve zero deforestation in the Amazon by 2020, according to the Global Canopy Programme’s REDD desk.But Santos has also made it clear that expanding the country’s agricultural sector, including the biofuels industry, is crucial to national development plans, which could contradict environmental protectionist policies.Area residents like Darly, as well as international organizations such as The Earth Institute, remain hopeful that the recent peace agreement signed between the FARC and the government will be the first step in addressing environmental and social concerns, since one of its main clauses is to invest in rural development issues.However, the current government policy of agricultural expansion and support for the cane industry could make changes in this business hard to achieve.Banner image: Flooded sugar cane fields near Colombia’s third largest city, Cali, in the department of Valle Del Cauca, during an intense rainy season. Photo by Neil Palmer (CIAT)Kimberley Brown is a freelance journalist based in South America. You can find her on Twitter at @KimberleyJBrown.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Citations:Perea-Morera, E. and Otero, J.T. Effect of Herbicide Glyphosate in Endophite Root and Orchids. University of Costa Rica. 2016.Barry D., Bailis, Robert (Eds.). Sustainable Development of Biofuels in Latin America and the Caribbean. 2014. Springer Science Business+Media.Background on sugarcane, UN Food and Agriculture OrganizationCrop water needs, UN Food and Agriculture OrganizationDrivers of Deforestation in Colombia, Earth Innovation InstituteDeforestation in Colombia, 2014, IDEAMColombia Sugar Industry Situational Analysis, Arche AdvisersUNHCR 2005 censusSmallholders at Risk. Oxfam briefing paper, 2014.Workers Without Rights, 2010. Washington Office on Latin Americalast_img read more

Conservation lessons from the bonobos

first_imgAnimals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Bonobos, Bushmeat, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Education, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Pet Trade, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.An orphan looks at his human foster mother after his daily bath. Photo by Kim Harrisberg Lola ya Bonobo, the world’s first bonobo sanctuary, was founded in 1994 by Claudine Andre, who came to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) at a young age, and who, after a chance meeting with a bonobo at the Kinshasa zoo, dedicated her life to the species. Today, Lola has been recognized worldwide as a model for primate rehabilitation.The sanctuary primarily credits “inclusive conservation” for its success, a process by which Lola not only cares for rescued DRC bonobos, but also for nearby human communities — supporting farms, schools and medical facilities. The communities in turn support Lola.The bonobos at the sanctuary — often traumatized after being rescued from the great ape trade — spend years in rehabilitation, being served by human foster mothers and other caring Lola staff. When deemed ready, bonobo troupes are returned to the wild Congo. The Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary is renowned for its conservation of bonobos (Pan paniscus). Photo by Kim HarrisbergThe dramatic urban energy of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s capital, seems a world away from the green expanse of the Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary in Les Petites Chutes de la Lukaya — a 75-acre forest reserve that is home to more than 70 rescued bonobos, humanity’s closest kin.Inside the sanctuary, bonobo screeches rise above the flowing rush of the Lukaya River. The sanctuary’s name translates as “the paradise of bonobos” in Lingala. It’s a safe haven for the great apes rescued from a fate that others of their kind suffer when captured for bushmeat, to become pets or circus animals. At Lola ya Bonobo they find a home with a human foster mother, heal from the trauma of their illegal capture, and are given a second chance at life through a rehabilitation program.Known as the “hippies of the forest,” bonobos are peace-loving great apes that fascinate conservationists, activists and the general public. Unfortunately for them, their trusting natures make these primates easy targets for hunters. Poaching and habitat loss have left as few as 15,000 bonobos in the wild today. The species is listed as Endangered by the IUCN.These great apes, with which we share 98.7 percent of our genetic makeup, are unique and worth conserving for an array of reasons: the only place they are found naturally is in the Congo; the females are the “alpha males” of the species; bonobos resolve most conflicts with their fellows through sex, dissipating tensions with lovemaking; and they act as a vital link in an understanding of our evolutionary history.A young bonobo looks on at his fellow bonobos at play. Photo by Kim HarrisbergA sanctuary’s birthThe founder of Lola ya Bonobo, Claudine Andre, arrived in Kinshasa from Belgium at a young age with her veterinarian father. As she recounts on the Lola website: “My first school was the forest.” She spent her childhood surrounded by and committed to nature.As an adult in 1993, when a young bonobo arrived at the city zoo at which she volunteered, the two formed a bond that would guide Claudine’s major life decisions. She dedicated herself to establishing a sanctuary for bonobos, and to raising public awareness of their need for protection — goals Claudine achieved while simultaneously raising her own five children.In 1994, she opened Lola Ya Bonobo, the first bonobo sanctuary in the world, an institution that has endured through financial uncertainty, political instability and even armed conflict. Claudine has since been awarded the National Order of Merit by France, and the Prince Laurent Prize of the Environment by Belgium. Today, she travels the globe raising awareness of the bonobos’ plight, while also raising funds to make sure her bonobo paradise keeps flourishing.A male bonobo enjoys his daily cucumber snack amid the dense foliage of the sanctuary. Photo by Kim HarrisbergThe bonobos use sticks to reach out and collect floating vegetables from the water of the sanctuary’s lake. Photo by Kim HarrisbergThe bonobo brainA quick visit to the sanctuary reveals the bonobos’ extraordinary intelligence, an aptitude that has been witnessed many times by those dedicated to caring for the animals. “We realized they can understand three languages,” exclaims the resident veterinarian Raphaël Belais like a proud father. The animals, he says, respond to “French, English and Lingala.”When planning medical treatments, the staff now regularly speaks out of hearing range from bonobo enclosures, as the bonobos recognize their names being spoken, even as much as a day in advance, and then hide to avoid receiving medications.These great apes know the time of day their food will arrive, and use rocks as tools to crack open nuts and seeds — a technique taught to the sanctuary’s bonobos by two new arrivals and a discovery that then spread like wildfire to all the bonobos within the reserve.The bonobos’ sophisticated intelligence is matched by their amicability, which is a valuable survival technique. Studies have shown that chimpanzees under stress release testosterone, making them more aggressive. In bonobos, cortisol (a stress hormone) is released, but conflict isn’t the result. Instead, cortisol pushes bonobos to seek physical assurance. Further studies have shown that this loving tendency leads to better cooperation and makes bonobos more effective than chimps in food retrieval.Mamfufu community farming president Junior Mbo (left) stands proudly with his crops and a fellow farmer. Lola ya Bonobo provides equipment and training to nearby farming communities and utilizes the harvest to feed the bonobos. Photo by Kim HarrisbergConservation through communityA short motorbike ride away from Lola is the community of Mamfufu. Here, residents weed and water their small gardens with no visible connection to the bonobos nor the sanctuary. These gardens are, however, an essential piece in the sanctuary’s community engagement strategy.“Conservation does not work if you are only thinking about the animals,” explains Fanny Minesi, Claudine’s daughter and the sanctuary’s operations manager. “We need to think about the [human] community too, and how their wellbeing can benefit the animals, and vice versa.” This ethos is carried into Lola`s community farming campaigns, such as the one found in Mamfufu.But how one imagines the human community will benefit, and how people will actually end up benefiting can be two very different things, says Fanny. In explanation, she offers up the example of naïve international development agencies distributing mosquito nets to African communities who then used them as fishing nets instead. “We need to communicate with the [local] community, incentivize them and include them in the conservation process.”This close relationship between sanctuary and community is especially strong for the local farmers in Mamfufu and in nearby communities who supply almost all of the food for the bonobos. The farmers were trained to their task via a Lola initiative — acquiring the skills and materials needed to farm sustainably and provide the cucumbers, onions, lettuce and more, that goes towards feeding 70 hungry bonobos.“Farming has helped me support my children and their school fees,” explains Junior Mbo, the community’s farming president, standing proudly alongside his blossoming crops. “Before, everything was haphazard and the seeds would run away in the rain. Now we keep track of how much is planted and grown.”The community is tied to Lola in other ways. Mamfufu Primary, the local school, relies on the sanctuary for writing materials and other help. School principal Michel Mukoko, points out a dilapidated structure: “This is the building of the school. It is not easy. It is risky as it could fall down, but Lola helps a lot with stationery and support.”As a result, Lola has a reputation in the surrounding area not only for rescuing bonobos, but also as a backer of farms, schools, and hospitals — providing beds, medical supplies and training are all part of Lola’s developmental mission.“This is what makes Lola work,” reflects Raphaël. “This [support] makes people believe in the [bonobo] project, and that’s why the local population wants to help. They know that our goal is to protect the bonobos, but it is not only that — it is also about the people.”Michel Mukoko, the principal of Mamfufu Primary, received school stationery and other support from Lola ya Bonobo. The sanctuary has close ties to local schools and hospitals. Photo by Kim HarrisbergThis beautifully decorated bus brings school children on fieldtrips to learn about and visit with the bonobos on an almost weekly basis. The sanctuary sees education as a primary tool for combatting bonobo trafficking. Photo by Kim HarrisbergConservation through educationOne of the most influential and effective ways in which Lola has engaged with the community is through its educational programs; as many as 20,000 school children visit the sanctuary annually to learn about the bonobos.Susie Katwenda, Lola’s biologist and a researcher, has worked with the sanctuary for eleven years and is one of the notable personalities that school children encounter on their visits: “What do local people care about conservation?” she asks bluntly. “Local people in the equatorial forest need something to eat. We try to help animals, but also we are taking care of the people too. Because if people are still hungry they won’t care; they won’t have ears to listen.”Lola’s educational programs always involve a dialogue, says Katwenda. This means that local people can express their needs and concerns, that they feel listened to and that their cultural traditions are being respected. “We make [the people] responsible for the bonobos too, and help them with fishing and farming so they have other means of survival [rather than hunting]. We fight together for the bonobos.”Among Lola’s chief allies and resources are the local children. They often alert the staff when bonobos are captured and held locally in cages or are being sold in markets. Four rescued bonobo orphans currently living at the sanctuary were rescued due to student tip-offs.Lola’s educational process is well structured: first, the staff travels to the schools to show the children pictures of the bonobos and talk about the animals’ behaviors. A visit to the sanctuary comes next, along with a movie and a snack. “So they learn, but it is also an adventure,” says Katwenda.Susie’s proudest moment was when she was contacted by locals who had captured a bonobo in the forest with the aim of selling the animal. But then they had a change of heart. “They contacted us and apologized. The bonobo was wounded. We created a plan to bring her here [to the sanctuary]. It was a wonderful moment — to see the community involved in the protection of the bonobo. To see how their [thinking] had changed.”A young orphaned bonobo is fed milk by his foster mother. Photo by Kim HarrisbergConservation through rehabilitation Visitors to the sanctuary are often reminded of the genetic similarities our two species share, especially when they see how newly arrived bonobo orphans relate to their human foster mothers, who care for the animals until they are ready for introduction to their fellow bonobos. Their morning rituals together are fascinating and fun to watch. The baby bonobos look akin to hairy, highly agile, but very mischievous, three-year-old humans. They are bathed with buckets of water and their fur is rubbed with oil before they are fed milk from a bottle. The bonobos seek out “tickles,” get jealous when a sibling gets tickled first, eat fruit with fervor, and chase one another up their jungle gym.Seeing their spirited activity makes one almost forget the trauma these bonobos suffered before arriving at the sanctuary: many likely saw their mothers killed and butchered as bushmeat before being captured and tied up or caged themselves.The blissful bonds achieved with their foster mothers are all part of the slowly unfolding rehabilitation process. This is how their healing begins: being loved by the same species that harmed them in the first place. The lengthy rehabilitation process, which takes multiple years to accomplish with the different troupes, comes to a conclusion when the bonobos are released back into their wild Congo basin habitat.The young orphans get bathed each day. Photo by Kim HarrisbergGoing homeIt is late afternoon at the sanctuary. Insects buzz through the heavy humidity as the sun becomes less intense and the forest begins to darken. A troupe of bonobos has gathered near the river, awaiting the sugarcane treats about to be distributed by Jean Claude Nzumbe, one of Lola’s oldest and most experienced caretakers. Jean Claude’s connection to nature began at a young age. As a small child he would gather up injured insects in a toy cart to protect them, earning him the nickname “Mr. Butterfly.”Mr. Butterfly will shortly say goodbye to this bonobo group, which will soon be taken to Ekolo ya Bonobo, “the land of the bonobos” to complete their rehabilitation. This 20,000 hectare (77 square mile) forest lies within the Congo basin, near the city of Basankusu.Here too, Lola works closely with the local human community, offering educational services and providing better access to healthcare. Lola supplies equipment for a women’s birthing center, pharmacy medications, and educational materials for the schools. Thanks to this support, the community has come to better understand the value and importance of the bonobos in their new habitat, and to firmly support Lola’s mission.An alpha female reaches up to catch her daily vegetable snack. On this day it was an onion, which she caught in one hand like a professional baseball player. Photo by Christopher ClarkOver his long tenure, Jean Claude says that he has seen it all: he was on hand when the first bonobos were brought to the sanctuary back in 1994, and later when the world’s first bonobo release into their natural habitat was a success in 2009.Does he ever regret having to say goodbye to his “children” as they move off, back into the forest? “No,” he responds. “This is what is supposed to happen.”Despite this acknowledgment, Jean Claude gets tears in his eyes when he recalls how the first troupe to be rehabilitated reacted when he visited them in the forest six years later: “They saw me and immediately started shouting and dancing. It made me realize how special they are as a species and why it is so important to protect them. They had adapted so well, they were so happy, but they still remembered me. It was a special moment and I was very moved.”Bonobo rehabilitation is a painstaking process that takes time, energy and attention. It involves years of nurturing by human foster mothers and staff who help the traumatized animals heal. “They have taught me patience,” reflects Jean Claude. “And also that everything is settled by love.”last_img

Five new species in world’s largest tree genus found on Sulawesi

first_imgSyzygium is a genus of flowering trees and shrubs in the myrtle family that contains more than 1,500 species.Only 14 of those were previously known to occur on Sulawesi, the world’s eleventh-largest island, however. By comparison, Borneo, Sulawesi’s larger neighbor to the west, is home to around 200 Syzygium species.Due to the rate of tropical forest destruction across Indonesia, according to the researchers who discovered the new Syzygium species, three of the five newly described species on Sulawesi qualify for an endangered listing on the IUCN Red List. The Indonesian island of Sulawesi’s unique fauna has received far more attention than its flora. But the authors of a study describing five new tree species — the first new species belonging to the world’s largest tree genus found on Sulawesi in 167 years — hope to change that.Syzygium is a genus of flowering trees and shrubs in the myrtle family that contains more than 1,500 species. Only 14 of those were previously known to occur on Sulawesi, the world’s eleventh-largest island, however. By comparison, Borneo, Sulawesi’s larger neighbor to the west (and the third largest island in the world), is home to around 200 Syzygium species.PhD student Fabian Brambach was part of a team of ecologists with Germany’s University of Göttingen who collected specimens of the newly discovered species while doing fieldwork in the mountain rainforests of Sulawesi’s Lore Lindu National Park. The researchers couldn’t identify some of the myrtle species they’d sampled when they got back to their lab. Brambach says that, in addition to the general lack of knowledge about the botanical richness of Sulawesi, that might be due to the abundance of known species in Syzygium, which could have discouraged researchers from focusing on the genus in the past.One of the newly described species, Syzygium balgooyi. Photo by Fabian Brambach.“This is probably why our basic knowledge of the taxonomy of Syzygium hasn’t improved much since the early days of botanical exploration of the region in the first half of the 19th century,” Brambach, the lead author of a paper describing the five new species published in the journal PhytoKeys this month, said in a statement.Brambach and team turned to James Byng, who is director of Plant Gateway, a botanical research group and publisher, as well as a research fellow at Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in the Netherlands. Byng, a co-author of the PhytoKeys paper, is working on a global taxonomic revision of the genus Syzygium, and he says he was not surprised by the discovery of the new species on Sulawesi.“After extensive screening of herbarium specimens from Sulawesi, I had estimated around 90 additional species to be present on the island, most of which are not yet named and probably only occur there,” Byng said. “This would mean we only currently know around 13% of the island’s real diversity.”“These are the first descriptions of Syzygium species from the island since Blume (1850, Jambosa celebica and J. cornifolia), highlighting the significant lack of taxonomic research on the genus for the region,” the authors write in the study. They proposed the names Syzygium balgooyi, Syzygium contiguum, Syzygium devogelii, Syzygium eymae, and Syzygium galanthum for the new species.The authors add that it is critical for us to better understand the Syzygium species inhabiting Sulawesi’s forests: “Species of Syzygium are present in virtually all ecosystems of Sulawesi, and are often important components of the biological communities, so the lack of taxonomic resolution presents a serious impediment for a better understanding of ecological processes as well as for conservation efforts on the island.”Due to the rate of tropical forest destruction across Indonesia, according to the researchers, three of the five newly described species on Sulawesi qualify for an endangered listing on the IUCN Red List. That makes botanical study of the island all the more pressing, study co-author Heike Culmsee of the German Federal Foundation for the Environment said.“In this time of rapid species loss worldwide, cooperation between field ecologists and herbarium taxonomists is important to document the vast diversity of organisms in understudied regions, such as tropical mountain forests, especially for large and complicated groups like Syzygium.”Syzygium galanthum, one of five newly described tree species from Sulawesi. Photo by Fabian Brambach.CITATIONBrambach, F., Byng, J.W., & Culmsee, H. (2017). Five new species of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from Sulawesi, Indonesia. PhytoKeys 81: 47-78. doi:10.3897/phytokeys.81.13488Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Biodiversity, Environment, New Discovery, Rainforests, Species Discovery, Threats To Rainforests, Trees, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Diamond League schedule (Selected events)

first_imgDiamond League schedule (Selected events)n 10:10 a.m: Women’s triple Jump: Shanieka Thomasn 11:15 a.m: Women’s 100m: Veronica Campbell-Brown, Simone Faceyn 11:39 a.m: Women’s 400m Hurdles, Kaliese Spencern 12:09 p.m: Men’s 200m: Nickel Ashmeaden 12:34 p.m: Men’s 110m Hurdles: Hansle Parchment, Omar McLeodlast_img

‘I’m the man to beat’ – History-chasing McLeod embraces favourite’s tag for 110m hurdles gold medal

first_img Happy to be in semis BEIJING, China: Omar McLeod arrived in Beijing as quite a big deal, being the fastest man in China entered in the 110m hurdles at the IAAF World Championships. It almost came undone for the in-form Jamaica champion, who survived an eventful heat yesterday to book his spot in today’s semi-final (6:05 a.m.) and keep alive his dream of becoming Jamaica’s first World champion in the event. In fact, no Jamaican has ever won a medal in this event at the World Championships, with Maurice Wignall’s fifth-place finish in Berlin in 2009 being the best placing by a Jamaican at these championships. McLeod, whose 12.97 seconds at the National Senior Championships leads all competitors here, saw hurdles crashing around him, hit four of them himself and also got hit on the arm by Trinidad and Tobago’s Mikel Thomas – who later crashed out of the race. The Jamaican, however, still kept his composure to finish second in 13.43 behind Barbados’ Shane Brathwaite, 13.28, with China’s Wenjun Xie, 13.44, taking third. McLeod is certainly not hiding from suggestions that he is the man to beat in Beijing, underlining that he is fine with being considered a favourite to win and declaring his psychological readiness for a shot a history. “I’m tough all round. I really wanted to make the semi-finals. When everything happened, I thought I was a bit behind, but I told myself, ‘top four, play it safe, no pressure, just have fun and make the semi-final,’ and I’m happy I was able to do that,” said McLeod. “It probably was my worst race, but this is hurdles, and you have to go in mentally tough, if stuff like this happens, you have to know how to deal with it. “I have the fastest time here, so, obviously, I am the man to beat, but I try not to think about it too much. All I want to do is to try and run the same race I’ve been running all season,” McLeod added. “I’m not here to think about anybody else. Everybody wants it and it’s going to boil down to who has the most perfect race on the day. I’m ready to go and I’m feeling good. “I really just wanted to come out here and get this first run under the belt. Obviously there were a lot of flaws in the race as you saw. This is really going to test my strength going forward and I’m looking forward to it,” added the 2015 NCAA indoor and outdoor champion, who a couple months ago announced his decision to turn professional. “It’s of course my first World Championships and I was excited. I was really nervous and wanted to get going, feel the stadium and the atmosphere, and I’m happy I did,” he shared. McLeod will run out of lane six in semi-final two, where he will come up against world record holder Aries Merritt and French medal hopeful Pascal Martinot-Lagarde.last_img read more

Past the finishing post

first_imgWeather: Fine; Track: Good’LUCKY5′ DASH TROPHYRace 1 1400 M (Purse $660,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($350,0-$300,0)/NB5YO(NW3)*1. FLYING MIRACLE AMartin 54.52. CHANGE HIM NAME OWalker 54.0 2L3. PLAY STATION ABudhu 52.0 2 1/2L4. AQUILO JErwin 54.0 1 1/4LLate scratch : #7 MERUWIN: 119.00Final Time : 1:28.3 Splits : 24.1, 47.2Winner : 5yo b horse – MIRACLE MAN – MORNING LILYTrainer : ENOS BROWN Owner : GARY S. AINSWORTHBred by ROBERT LEEQuinella: $204.00 Exacta : (2-4) $349.00Trifecta: $588.00SUPREME VENTURES “SUPER CHALLENGE” TROPHYRace 2 1100 M (Purse $950,000) NB2-Y-O MAIDEN CONDITION RACE*1. SORRENTINOS LEGACY PFrancis 50.52. PROUD PRESIDENT OEdwards3 50.5 3/4L3. PATCH DaneNelson 53.0 2/1 3 1/4L4. ZEPHYR SMuir 52.0 6/1 3LWIN: $112.00PLACE: $56.00, $53.00, $58.00Final Time : 1:08.0 Splits : 23.2, 47.0Winner : 2yo b filly – SORRENTINO – RAVINGTrainer : PHILIP FEANNY Owner : PARKLAND STABLESBred by ROBERT S. DABDOUBQuinella: $174.00 Exacta: $387.00D/E: $590.00Superfecta: $344.00SUPREME VENTURES ‘JUST BET DASH’ TROPHYRace 3 1200 M (Purse $880,000) 3-Y-O & UP OVERNIGHT ALLOWANCE1. DIFERENTGENERATION OWhite 50.02. RED FLAG PFrancis 52.0 1 1/2L*3. BORDER LINE JErwin 54.0 3L4. RUM PUNCH SMuir 52.5 NeckWIN: $273.00PLACE: $82.00, $76.00, $77.00Final Time : 1:13.1 Splits : 22.3, 45.3Winner : 6yo b horse – CONGAREE – COTTA’S JEWELTrainer: PHILLIP LEE Owner : INTEL DIPLOBred by Y.S. (1955) LTD.Quinella: $992.00 Exacta: $1,675.00D/E: $1,978.00Superfecta: $8,516.00Rolling Triple: $3,491.00SUPREME VENTURES “MILLIONAIRE DREAM” TROPHYRace 4 1400 M (Purse $868,000) NB3-Y-O MAIDEN CONDITION RACE1. I HAVE A DREAM SMuir 53.0 12/1 651.00 200.002. MINY LEE JErwin 55.0 5/1 1/2 135.003. DEMOLITION BOY CChow 53.0 8/1 1 1/4 140.004. PRINCESS STATISTIC RMitchell 54.0 7/1 3/4Late scratch : #9 ABOGADOWIN: $651.00PLACE: $200.00, $135.00, $140.00Final Time : 1:31.0 Splits : 24.2, 48.1, 1:15.1Winner : 3yo b filly – HOMING INSTINCT – DARE TO DREAMTrainer : DEON FACEY Owner : BYRON MCKEN & DEON FACEYBred by LAKELAND FARMS LTD.Quinella: $2,128.00 Exacta: $4,572.00D/E: $6,022.00Superfecta: $24,245.00Rolling Triple: $25,713.00SUPREME VENTURES “GAMES PEOPLE LOVE TO PLAY” TROPHYRace 5 1820 M (Purse $660,000) NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE IV(NW3)1. SUPER HERITAGE RMitchell 54.0*2. NO MONEY FRIEND WHenry 55.0 3 1/2L3. NATASHADONTPLAY AndrePowell4 52.5 2L4. NO PAIN NO GAIN PFrancis 52.0 2LWIN: $592.00PLACE: $80.00, $59.00, $70.00Final Time : 2:01.1 Splits : 27.4, 53.0, 1:18.1, 1:45.2Winner : 4yo b colt – WAR MARSHALL – AKIODATrainer : JOHNNY WILMOT Owner : ZELMUNABred by DION JACKSONQuinella: $946.00 Exacta: $1,806.00D/E: $8,498.00Superfecta: $12,880.00Rolling Triple: $66,046.00DOLLAZ ‘CASH BONANZA’ TROPHYRace 6 1000 M (S) (Purse $630,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($250,0-$210,0)/NB5YO(NW2) & 6YO&UP(NW4)1. FIFTYONESTORM AMartin 55.02. GOLD SCREW BebHarvey3 51.5 Sh.Head3. EL NUMERO UNO DaneNelson 54.0 1L4. WINESHA RHalledeen 53.0 5/1 3/4Late scratch : #9 STORMONTHESEAWIN: $289.00PLACE: $137.00, $401.00, $208.00Final Time : 0:59.4 Splits : 22.4, 46.2Winner : 4yo b filly – STORM CRAFT – SHE’S A GEMTrainer : O’NEIL MARKLAND Owner : JANET NAJAIRBred by ALLAN L. FLOWERSQuinella: $3,429.00 Exacta: $5,123.00D/E: $3,361.00Trifecta: $21,529.00Hit-6: $48,110.00Rolling Triple: $58,185.00Super-6: $2,075,944.00HARRY JACKSON MEMORIAL CUPRace 7 2400 M (Purse $1,250,000) 3-Y-O & UP GRADED STAKES*1. PERFECT NEIGHBOUR OFoster 53.02. LONG RUNNING TRAIN AChatrie 51.5 2L3. TYPEWRITER DaneNelson 57.0 6L4. HOVER CRAFT AndrePowell4 50.0 1LWIN: $94.00Final Time : 2:35.3 Splits : 25.3, 49.4, 1:15.2, 1:39.3, 2:06.0Winner : 5yo b horse – NATURAL SELECTION – DESPERATEHOUSEWIFETrainer : WAYNE DACOSTA Owner : ALFRED A. LEE & JEFFREY S. MORDECAIBred by Y.S. (1955) LTD.Quinella: $355.00 Exacta : $374.00D/E : $630.00Trifecta: $192.00Rolling Triple: $10,320.00Pick-4 : $143,720.00SUPER LOTTO “BECOME A SUPER MILLIONAIRE” TROPHYRace 8 1500 M (Purse $868,000) IMP3YO&UP(NW3&MDN)/NB3YO-RESTRICTED STAKES1. BRAWN AChatrie 56.0*2. ORIGINAL TRAIN DaneNelson 54.0 1 1/2L3. DWAYNE STAR WHenry 51.0 Neck4. TARANIS BebHarvey3 51.0 1LLate scratch : #4 KIRIWIN: $152.00PLACE: $73.00, $74.00, $97.00Final Time : 1:32.3 Splits : 23.2, 46.0, 1:11.3Winner : 3yo colt – SARAVA – LA FAYETrainer : GARY SUBRATIE Owner : MICHROSBred by SCF, INC DBA SOUTHERN CROSS FARMQuinella: $182.00 Exacta: $483.00D/E: $383.00Superfecta: $1,084.00Rolling Triple: $3,018.00TOP DRAW ‘MILLION JACKPOT EVERY DAY’ TROPHYRace 9 1700 M (Purse $918,000) NB3YO(NW2)IMP3YO&UP(MDN)-REST.ALL.II*1. ABBEY ROAD OEdwards3 49.02. TURBO MACHINE CAT RMitchell 53.5 Neck3. SHINE RMairs 54.5 8L4. TARANTINO OWhite 50.0 7L5. SNEAK PEEK JAnderson 51.5 1 3/4LLate scratch : #10 SWEET DIMENSIONWIN: $121.00PLACE: $57.00, $59.00, $65.00Final Time : 1:47.1 Splits : 23.4, 47.1, 1:12.3, 1:39.3Winner : 3yo ch colt – BLUE PEPSI LODGE – BROADWAY BELLETrainer : RICHARD AZAN Owner : ELITE BLOODSTOCK LIMITEDBred by IAN PARSARDQuinella: $149.00 Exacta: $314.00D/E: $469.00Trifecta: $150.00Hi-5: $1,932.00Rolling Triple: $1,218.00PlacePot 8: $17,747.00(SUPREME VENTURES) JAMAICA 2-Y-O STAKESRace 10 1600 M (Purse $4,000,000) NB2-Y-O FUTURITY1. FUTURE KING RHalledeen 57.02. NUCLEAR AFFAIR AChatrie 55.0 Neck3. BIGDADDYKOOL SEllis 57.0 2L4. DREAMLINER OWalker 57.0 3/4L*5. SORRENTINO’S STAR DaneNelson 55.0 1 1/4LWIN: $319.00PLACE: $94.00, $107.00, $123.00Final Time : 1:38.4 Splits : 23.1, 45.3, 1:11.3Winner : 2yo b colt – NATURAL SELECTION – MILLENIUM PRINCESSTrainer : WAYNE DACOSTA Owner : ALFRED A. LEE & JEFFREY S. MORDECAIBred by Y.S. (1955) LTD.Quinella: $1,456.00 Exacta: $2,985.00D/E: $901.00Trifecta: $4,497.00Hi-5: $13,613.00Rolling Triple: $3,751.00MONEY TIME “WIN EVERY 5 MINUTES” TROPHYRace 11 1300 M (Purse $600,000) 3-Y-O & UP CLM($180,0)/NB6YO&UP(NW3)1. TECHNOCAT ADancel 55.02. REIGN OVER ALL OWalker 54.0 5L*3. SINK THE BISMARCK BebHarvey3 53.0 Sh.Head4. BURNING MEDIC RMitchell 54.0 Head5. SERIOUS BUSINESS DDawkins4 52.0 2 1/4 LWIN: $883.00PLACE: $226.00, $87.00, $81.00Final Time : 1:22.1 Splits : 23.4, 47.4, 1:14.4Winner : 5yo ch horse – TWILIGHT TIME – SECRET CATTrainer : RAY PHILLIPS Owner : MORRIS M MYRIEBred by CARL D. ANDERSONQuinella: $2,910.00 Exacta: $10,145.00D/E: $7,145.00Trifecta: $7,179.00Hi-5 carry-over : $99,898.50Rolling Triple: $29,078.00Pick-4: $96,012.00Super-6: $266,491.30Pick-9: $10,365.50; $139.50Carry-over : $399,071.40last_img read more

Pistols to blaze at Woodleigh’s Fast & Furious

first_imgWoodleigh’s 2016 Fast & Furious Pistol Championship will be a blazing affair tomorrow when the island’s top shooters clash in a test of speed and accuracy at the May Pen, Clarendon, range over 12 stages, shooting more than 200 rounds.United States-based Lesgar ‘Speedy’ Murdock could lead the charge in Open Division alongside Lennie ‘Aggressive’ Moulton, Kevin ‘Fastfoot’ Cheung, Bernard Lawrence and resident shooter, Howie Brown.Cheung warmed up by recently beating Moulton at The Jamaica Rifle Association and is hoping that the winning trend will continue at Woodleigh, which will feature open targets, set at from five to 10 yards with no penalty or steel plates to slow shooters.The championship will be the first Level-Three match being held by an affiliate club in Jamaica and sanctioned by the International Practical Shooting Confederation, match director Harry Chin Hing told The Gleaner.STANDARD DIVISIONRonald Brown Jr is fresh off a recent win at the Aruba Open Championship two weeks ago and will be going all out to take the Standard Division, which will also be keenly contested by JRA’s Andy Yapp and Mandeville Rifle and Pistol Club’s Orville ‘Reds’ Henriques.Meanwhile, the ever-improving Greg Henry, David Lazarus and recent Monster Match winner, Patrick Evelyn, will ensure the favourites are extended.”Either way you take it, it will be a fast one because I am boosted and will be hosing all the way through,” said Henry.PRODUCTION DIVISIONThe biggest group of shooters should come from Production Division in which senior veteran, Anthony ‘TJ’ Johnson will be gunning to stamp his class and take the President’s Medal. However, Master Class Ryan Bramwell may very well be the fly in the ointment.Chris Hart, Darin Richards, Ryan Grala, Chris Nunez and Paul Shoucair have all been putting in trigger time and must be aiming for a top podium spot. Michael Bradshaw has been figuring prominently lately on the score sheets and has to be watched.last_img read more

Champions dethroned in NBA All-Star events

first_img PRIMARY INFLUENCES NEW ORLEANS (AP): Glenn Robinson III is the NBA’s new dunk king, with an assist to Indiana teammate Paul George, the Pacers’ mascot and a Pacers cheerleader. Robinson leaped over all three, snagging the ball from George along the way before finishing with an emphatic, two-hand, reverse jam, giving him a perfect score – and the title – on his final dunk. “I know I’m a jumper. Like I said, I’m a guy that stays out of the way, but when it’s time to shine, that’s my thing,” Robinson said. “I knew all along I had some things planned and I just wanted to show the world.” Robinson edged out Phoenix’s Derrick Jones Jr, who was done in by his failure to complete his difficult first dunk of two in the final round. Jones still managed a perfect score on his second dunk, when he received a bounce-pass in the paint, put it between his legs and threw down a left-handed jam. But Robinson made sure it wasn’t enough. In the three-point contest, Houston’s Eric Gordon dethroned Golden State splash brother Klay Thompson. Kristaps Porzingis of the New York Knicks won the Skills Challenge. Both dunk finalists delighted the crowd with soaring slams over teammates and others that showcased the explosive spring in their vertical leaps. “I thought I would go up against Derrick in the finals,” Robinson said. “I’ve seen the things that he can do. That guy can jump.” Robinson’s first dunk was one of his best. He leap-frogged one man sitting on another’s shoulders, grabbed the ball from the elevated man’s hands and slammed it home. He said 2000 dunk champ Vince Carter was one of his primary influences, along with Michael Jordan, of course. “Vince Carter did one of his best dunks first, and it kind of intimidated people. That’s what I wanted to go out and do,” Robinson said. “Who knows if it worked, but they missed some of their dunks and it gave me a little more room.” DeAndre Jordan of the Los Angeles Clippers and Aaron Gordon of Orlando were unable to emerge from the first round. Jordan dunked over DJ turn tables and Gordon dunked after receiving a bounce pass from a drone that had flown over the court with the Star Wars theme music playing.last_img read more

Hearing impaired persons given green light to write drivers’ examination

first_imgFollowing a protest by members of the Deaf Association of Guyana in front of the Public Security Ministry requesting that they be given a fair chance to drive on Guyana’s roadways without discrimination, the green light has been given for them to write the drivers’ examination.Minister Khemraj Ramjattan has given the go-ahead to commence a pilot programme in A Division (Georgetown-East Bank Demerara), which will allow persons who have hearing impediments to participate in the theoretical and practical drivers’ examination on May 24.The commencement of the pilot programme was agreed to when Ramjattan recently met with the National Commission on Disability and the Deaf Association of Guyana.As such, six persons from the deaf community in Guyana will be included in the pilot project at a date to be announced later.A section of the protesters gathered opposite the Public Security Ministry on February 18, 2019The pilot programme is one of the recommendations agreed to by Government to facilitate the issuance of driver’s permit to persons who have hearing impediments. The other recommendations include a rigorous national awareness campaign for the general populace including the beneficiaries and the implementation of issuances of driver’s license to deaf drivers only for private and not commercial vehicles taking into consideration the present infrastructural development and culture of driving on Guyana’s roadways.On February 18 last, a group of persons from the Guyana Society for the Deaf protested the Public Security Ministry calling for drivers’ licences to be issued for them.It was explained that they met with the Government some time ago to discuss the issue when they were assured it would have been discussed.They said that the deaf should be given equal privileges as those who can hear and should not be discriminated against as they held their placards across from the Ministry.Some of them contended that they have been driving for a very long time and was never involved in an accident while others argued that the deaf are treated equally in other countries and are allowed to drive but they are being discriminated against in their own country.In relation to responding to emergency vehicles, those persons noted that they are capable of driving by using their mirrors to see what is happening around them.The protesters said that because of how they are being treated, they are forced to use taxis even though many of them already have their own vehicles.In the region, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Jamaica, Suriname, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru among other countries allow deaf drivers to obtain licences.last_img read more