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Justice Releases ‘Safe and Sound’, First New Track In Five Years

first_img[story via Pitchfork – photo via TenementTV] It has been five long years since French electronic duo Justice have released new original material, but that wait is finally over. The duo of Gaspard Michel Andre Augé and Xavier de Rosnay have released their latest track “Safe and Sound“, which debuted at the Ed Banger House Party at the Sónar 2016 Music Festival back in June, during Pedro Winter’s (aka Busy P) DJ set.The duo has kept a fairly low profile since releasing Audio, Video, Disco back in 2011, with the subsequent tour in support of the album. With rare appearances at festival such as Coachella, Osheaga, Outside Lands and New Orleans’ Voodoo Experience, as well as the release of their live album Access All Arenas in 2013, Justice has been relatively quiet.It looks like things are about to change, as Paris and London-based independent record label Because Music revealed that the group is currently in the process of signing record release documents, making a potential release imminent. Busy P also revealed that the group was working on new material back in March, stating “they are locked in the studio every day”, via Tenement TV.In the meantime, listen to the the latest Justice track, which features some funky slap bass, along with string and choral arrangements.last_img read more

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Anstead named Chief Justice

first_img The Jacksonville native’s term begins July 1 Anstead named Chief Justice Anstead named Chief Justice May 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Born and raised in a single-parent home in Jacksonville’s Brentwood housing project during the Great Depression, Harry Lee Anstead began work at a young age, cutting lawns, moving furniture, doing anything to help support his family and build a future career for himself as a lawyer.Anstead, 64, advanced that career to the highest judicial office in state government on April 10 when the members of the Florida Supreme Court announced they had unanimously elected him chief jus-tice for a two-year term beginning July 1. Anstead will be Florida’s 50th chief justice.He said that the major priority of his administration will be maintaining the excellence of Florida’s trial courts during a time of transition. Under a 1998 constitutional amendment, funding for many trial court programs will shift from county budgets to the state budget by 2004. Implementation of this change still must be worked out with the legislature.“Florida’s trial courts have been universally recognized as models in programs like treatment-based drug courts, mediation, and unified family courts, to name only a few,” Anstead said. “My goal is to ensure that we maintain this standard of excellence during the reorganization of state courts mandated by the voters in 1998.”Other issues on the future-Chief Justice’s agenda include those affecting children in the courts, including possible reforms and heightened attention to the juvenile justice system.“We in the justice system should feel privileged that our society has placed its most troubled children on our doorstep, and I am concerned that we respond effectively,” Anstead said. “One of the most stirring pleas I have ever heard was the late Gov. Lawton Chiles’ last ‘state of the state’ speech, in which he declared that the one overriding issue we face in Florida is the way we treat our children — all of them.”Anstead worked his way through undergraduate and law school at the University of Florida, and he later earned a master of laws degree in the judicial process at the University of Virginia. Between undergraduate and law school, he served with the National Security Agency in Washington, D.C.Anstead began his legal career as a trial and appellate attorney until he became a judge of the Fourth District Court of Appeal in 1977, where he also served as chief judge, as well as serving from time-to-time as a circuit and county judge throughout the district. On August 29, 1994, he moved to the Florida Supreme Court through appointment by Chiles.While on the high court, Anstead initiated a comprehensive statewide program to improve professionalism among judges, lawyers, and law schools in the state. His initiative led to the creation of a permanent Center for Professionalism at The Florida Bar that the ABA has recognized as one of the most significant professionalism initiatives in the nation. Anstead has been called the father of the professionalism movement in Florida.Anstead’s life remains rooted in his experiences growing up in Jacksonville. For example, he always uses his full name — Harry Lee — because it honors an important figure in his early life. Many neighbors helped Loretta Anstead and her family after her husband abandoned the family shortly after Justice Anstead was born. One who helped was named Harry Lee Minor, and when Anstead expressed dislike for the name “Harry” his mother reminded him of its origin. He has proudly been “Harry” ever since.“My mother is my personal hero,” Anstead said. “It was a tribute to her tenacity that she did anything to support, keep us together, and managed to get us a unit in the Brentwood project, which at the time was much sought after, with its nearby schools and parks.”Life was still rough-and-tumble for Anstead. For a long time in the 1940s, his was the only Catholic family living in the housing project, and his best friend was from the only Jewish family. Both endured harassment because of their religious beliefs. While working as a laborer for a moving company in Jacksonville, Anstead’s work-mate and friend was a young African-American teenager.“We started work very early, so lunch was the high point of the day,” Anstead said. “But when it came time for lunch, I had to go inside and bring our lunches out for us to eat. Only whites were allowed inside in those days. The impact of discrimination is something I can never forget.”Through these experiences Anstead said he learned the positive message of tolerance very early.Anstead and his wife Sue, a child advocate before moving to Tallahassee, have five children — Chris, Jim, Laura, Amy, and Michael, and one grandchild, Ashlee Marie.last_img read more

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Fatigue is killing our productivity

first_imgI recently spoke with a good friend who is the CEO of a credit union.  I asked him what he struggled with, as CEO.Staff burnout, he said.  Almost without hesitation.Since the great recession and beyond, he’s been asking his staff to do more, with less.  They are very successful, but cracks are beginning to show.  And he worries how much longer things can stay the same.Does that sound familiar?  I bet it does.  We struggle with that at NAFCU, as well.Fatigue, it turns out, is a real threat to productivity.  This article (HBR.org) by Tony Schwartz does a great job of highlighting the issue.One CEO of a multinational company told me that just dealing with time differences had left him so exhausted he was seriously considering quitting. Another CEO at a much-admired company told me that for the first time, he’s losing truly valued employees who say they simply can’t take it anymore. In a recent survey at a third organization, over 80% of the top 400 leaders reported they spend the majority of their days feeling negative emotions, fueled in large part by overload and overwhelm. (Emphasis added.)I’ve written about this before.  In a post about “decision fatigue”, I wrote about research that showed how decision making abilities break down when people are overloaded by problems.Schwartz argues that companies must find ways to renew and reinvigorate their workforce.  Otherwise, they face higher turnover, and less productivity from those who remain.Ah, but there’s the rub.  We need work to be done.  We must balance our budgets. So how do we accomplish the renewal that Schwartz talks about?I’ll take any good ideas that you guys have. Seriously.  But here are some thoughts.I think it is a 2-part task.  Part of it is on companies.  But the other is on the employee.As employers, we need to allow for balance in the lives of our colleagues.  We must look for signs of burnout, and intervene as necessary.  And we must ruthlessly prioritize.  If we are doing things that don’t jive with our strategic plans, or are not necessary today, we need to consider why we are doing them.On the other hand, as individuals, we need to take more control over our lives.  If I lined up what I do (personal and work) versus what is truly important to me and my family, I know I’d see a disconnect. For example, through Facebook, I keep in touch with hundreds of friends from high school and college. Twenty years ago, that would not have been possible.  Is that good or bad?  Probably both. While it is great to “like” an update from a buddy’s Facebook page, am I spreading myself too thin?  Should I trade in some of this stuff for a more simple, management life?I wish I had answers here, guys. So if any of you have tips to battle fatigue, I’m all ears. I truly believe this is one of those issues that we’ll have to deal with sooner rather than later. 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Anthony Demangone Anthony Demangone is executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU). Demangone oversees day-to-day operations and manages the association’s education, membership, … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com/partner/nafcu Detailslast_img read more

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PREMIUMCOVID-19: Indonesia calls for greater cooperation as countries close borders

first_imgTopics : Facebook Indonesia health virus international-cooperation Foreign-Minister-Retno-Marsudi COVID-19 Google Indonesia is urging that countries band together in the fight to contain the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus globally, Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi said on Friday, as the international community begins imposing drastic measures like limited travel restrictions, large-scale evacuations and lockdowns of entire countries.The COVID-19 outbreak, declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization last week, has spread to more than 130 countries worldwide, forcing governments to take matters into their own hands to contain the virus, Retno told The Jakarta Post in an interview.She pointed out that different countries made different assessments of the situation. She noted that some were extreme, such as the complete lockdown of Italy, while other responses were more measured, like the partial lockdowns in China’s Hubei province and of Metro Manila in the Philippines. … LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Log in with your social account Forgot Password ?last_img read more

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US says foreign students whose classes move online cannot stay

first_imgPlans up in the air Most US colleges and universities have not yet announced their plans for the fall semester.A number of schools are looking at a hybrid model of in-person and online instruction but some, including Harvard University, have said all classes will be conducted online.Harvard said 40 percent of undergraduates would be allowed to return to campus — but their instruction would be conducted remotely.There were more than one million international students in the United States for the 2018-19 academic year, according to the Institute of International Education (IIE).That accounted for 5.5 percent of the total US higher education population, the IIE said, and international students contributed $44.7 billion to the US economy in 2018.The largest number of international students came from China, followed by India, South Korea, Saudi Arabia and Canada.According to Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, who works as the policy counsel at the Washington-based think tank American Immigration Council, the new rule is “almost certainly going to be challenged in court.”He explained on Twitter that foreign students will likely struggle to continue their studies while abroad, due to time differences or a lack of access to technology or academic resources.President Donald Trump, who is campaigning for reelection in November, has taken a bullish approach to reopening the country even as virus infections continue to spike in parts of the country, particularly the south and west.”SCHOOLS MUST OPEN IN THE FALL!!!” he tweeted Monday.With more than 130,000 deaths linked to the novel coronavirus, the United States is the hardest-hit country in the global pandemic.While cracking down on immigration is one of his key issues, Trump has taken a particularly hard stance on foreigners since the health crisis began.In June, he froze until 2021 the issuing of green cards — which offer permanent US resident status — and some work visas, particularly those used in the technology sector, with the stated goal of reserving jobs for Americans. “If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”ICE said the State Department “will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will US Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States.” F-1 students pursue academic coursework and M-1 students pursue “vocational coursework,” according to ICE.Universities with a hybrid system of in-person and online classes will have to show that foreign students are taking as many in-person classes as possible, to maintain their status. The United States said Monday it would not allow foreign students to remain in the country if all of their classes are moved online in the fall because of the coronavirus crisis.”Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States,” US Immigration and Custom Enforcement said in a statement.”Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status,” ICE said. Topics : Critics quickly hit back at the decision. “The cruelty of this White House knows no bounds,” tweeted Senator Bernie Sanders.”Foreign students are being threatened with a choice: risk your life going to class-in person or get deported,” he said.For Gonzalo Fernandez, a 32-year-old Spaniard doing his doctorate in economics at George Washington University in the US capital, “the worst thing is the uncertainty.””We don’t know if we will have classes next semester, if we should go home, if they are going to throw us out.”last_img read more

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State Employees Set Goal to Donate Over $3 Million to Charities

first_imgState Employees Set Goal to Donate Over $3 Million to Charities Government That Works,  Human Services,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Commonwealth employees are seeking to raise $3.15 million in donations to charitable organizations through their annual workplace giving campaign, the State Employee Combined Appeal (SECA).“Hundreds of charities benefit each year from the caring and generosity of our state employees through SECA and we are extremely proud of our long tradition of giving,” Governor Wolf said. “While there are many worthy causes in need of support, it is likely that the natural disaster unfolding in the Gulf Coast will be on the minds of many as they make their annual pledges.”From September 5 to October 27, 2017, state employees will be able to pledge to the participating charities of their choice through payroll deductions or one-time donations. For the third year in a row, the Governor will pledge his entire salary through SECA.This year marks the 40th anniversary of the SECA campaign, which has distributed over $100 million in state employee donations to hundreds of charities in Pennsylvania and across the world.Last year, nearly 15,000 employees donated just over $3 million, with more than 5,000 choosing to be Leadership Givers by pledging the equivalent of at least a half-hour or one hour of pay per month for a year.“There is so much need in the world and we are fortunate as state employees to be in a position to help,” said Secretary of Administration Sharon Minnich, whose office oversees the SECA program. “Whether it is through SECA, volunteering outside of work or other efforts, we all have the ability to make a difference.”In order to receive donations through SECA, charities must be registered with the Pennsylvania Department of State and meet other program guidelines. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img September 08, 2017last_img read more

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No compromise on food security, says Grenada minister

first_imgNewsRegional No compromise on food security, says Grenada minister by: – June 21, 2011 Tweet Share Share 14 Views   no discussionscenter_img Sharing is caring! Share By Lincoln DepradinePhoto credit: elcivics.comCASTRIES, St Lucia — Grenada’s Agriculture and Fisheries Minister has said that food and nutrition security in the Caribbean requires regional countries fully utilizing their fish and other marine resources.Denis Lett told an OECS Fisheries meeting in Castries, St Lucia, that countries that “attempt to impede the rights of other nations” to use their ocean resources for their food and nutrition needs ought to be rebuked.“Their actions must be condemned,” said Lett at the two-day OECS Fisheries Ministers meeting, which opened Monday.“The issue of food and nutrition security for all people cannot be overstated,” Lett said. “Consequently, we are deeply disturbed when countries and organisations, who no longer have a strategic interest in the ocean as an essential source of food, would attempt to impede the rights of other nations who use the resources of the ocean on a sustainable basis for their food and nutrition security.”Lett described food security as both “a human right and a sovereign right,” saying neither must be compromised.“For us as a region,” he said, “it is even more fundamental, recognising our limited land space and small economies which are vulnerable to natural disasters and instability in international financial and economic conditions.”Lett urged Caribbean nations to take “full advantage of the relatively enormous marine space, which holds significant opportunities in contributing to the economic and social development of our peoples.”The St Lucia meeting is being attended by ministers from member-states of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States, ambassadors, senior fisheries officers, and commissioners of the International Whaling Commission (IWC).OECS states have been trying to develop coordinated negotiating strategies and positions to enhance their representation at fisheries-related international fora, such as at the IWC.The Commission is scheduled to meet next month and Lett hopes there will be less division among IWC members.“I trust that this year’s meeting can, at a minimum, recognise the rights of all peoples to self-determination,” he said. “Moreover, our goal is to ensure that we can achieve an equitable resolution on the many issues confronting the organisation, which would serve the interest of all.”Biologist Peter Murray, a programme officer at the OECS Secretariat in Castries, said it’s important that the Caribbean is represented on international bodies, where policy decisions are made on the use and exploitation on the world’s marine resources.“We need to join to have a say. Let us come to grips with reality,” Murray said.He claimed that the value of fisheries to regional economies is “underrated,” and suggested the adoption in the Caribbean of a “common industrial policy that will include the fisheries sector.”All speakers on the first day of meeting touched on issues such as the potential for expanding the fishing sector in the region and related many of its challenges, such as lack of venture capital and insurance coverage; the need for improved marketing; building capacity among fisher folks; and investing in fish processing and product development.“The region is a significant consumer of fish products,” said Justin Rennie, Grenada’s Chief Fisheries Officer. “We import a significant amount of fish and fish products. The OECS is a net importer of fish and fish products.”Among solutions proposed was the formation of cooperatives to help augment the catch in fish and to better market and manage the industry.Cooperatives are going to be “our saviour,” said Hilson Baptiste, Minister of Agriculture, Lands, Housing and Environment of Antigua and Barbuda.Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more

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Tim Schoettmer named ClearPoint VP, CFO

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — Tim Schoettmer has been named to ClearPoint Federal Bank & Trust’s leadership team as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.He will be responsible for leading the finance, tax, and accounting organizations, as well as developing financial plans to position the bank for continued growth.Schoettmer succeeds Dan Wisley, who retired after serving as CFO for many years.Schoettmer served as the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for FCN Bank before joining ClearPoint.last_img

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Final Four

first_imgThe Final Four is nowhere close to what most people probably picked.  On the one side of the bracket Villanova and Kansas,  the #1 seeds. are still in the running.  On the other side you have #3 Michigan playing #11 Loyola of Chicago.  If you are a sentimentalist, you will be rooting for Loyola.  If you are trying to protect your brackets, you will most likely hope Villanova or Kansas win.  For Sally and I, we are sticking with Michigan since it is the only Big Ten school left.  Oh, by the way, it was also the team we pulled out of the hat when there were 68 schools available.  If we want to win the big bucks (ho, ho), go Michigan!Along with basketball, we hope you have a very Happy Easter!last_img

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Absentee and Early voting hours for Franklin County

first_imgBrookville, IN—Tuesday, November 5  is a General Municipal Election Day.  The election held in Franklin County that day is only for the City of Batesville and the Town of Laurel.The first day that a voter may vote an absentee ballot before the Absentee Voter Board in the Clerk’s office at the Franklin County Courthouse is Monday, October 21. Early Vote Hours are:October 21, 2019 thru Oct. 25, 2019 8:30am to 4:00pm  October 28, 2019 thru Nov. 1, 2019 8:30am to 4:00pm November 2, 2019 9:00am to 3:00pm Monday, November 4 at NOON is the last day to vote an absentee ballot before the Absentee Board in the Franklin County Clerk’s Office.If you would like to vote by mail or have the traveling board come to your house to vote, please contact the Clerk’s office for an Absentee Ballot Application.  Call the Clerk’s office at (765) 647-5111 ext. 3 for an application or if you have any questions.last_img read more