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GarageCam, live from indy, now

first_imgREAD: Complete coverage from Eldora READ: Memorable moments of the first half READ: Paint Scheme Preview: Indianapolis, Eldora READ: Complete coverage from Indianapoliscenter_img READ MORE: Watch GarageCam, live from Indy, 10 a.m. ET on July 26last_img

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The Revivalists Announce New Studio Album, ‘Take Good Care’, Due Out In November

first_imgAfter much speculation, The Revivalists have finally announced their brand-new and long-awaited studio album, which is titled Take Good Care and due out on November 9th via Loma Vista Recordings. During the group’s sold-out show at the iconic Red Rocks Amphitheatre last night, the New Orleans-based band first broke the news to fans, who have been eagerly awaiting a follow-up to 2015’s Men Amongst Mountains.As noted in a press release,Marked by songwriting that is both intensely personal and also an escape, Take Good Care is brimming with sonic complexity, celebration, and catharsis. Sometimes raising more questions than answers, it is a reflection of the up-and-down journey of life that we’re all on together. For the first time, The Revivalists recorded and co-wrote with multiple producers and writers, enlisting the talents of Dave Cobb [Sturgill Simpson, Chris Stapleton], Andrew Dawson [Kanye West, Fun., Sleigh Bells], and Dave Bassett [Elle King, Vance Joy] for sessions in New Orleans as well as Nashville, where they recorded at the iconic RCA Studio B, soaking up the aura of one of the most storied studios in music.The Revivalists’ upcoming 14-track LP is currently available for pre-order, in addition to instant downloads of hit single “All My Friends” and fan-favorite live staple “You And I” off the forthcoming Take Good Care. Furthermore, the band is currently on the road to hype their new studio effort, with a mix of upcoming headlining dates and fall festivals on their calendar, which is listed below. For more information about Take Good Care or for ticketing, head to the band’s website here.Take Good Care Tracklist:1. Otherside2. All My Friends3. Change4. Got Love5. Next To You6. You Said It All7. Oh No8. You and I9. Hate To Love You10. Future11. When I’m With You12. Celebration13. Some People Say14. Shoot You DownView All TracksThe Revivalists Upcoming 2018 Tour Dates:September 15                   Atlanta, GA @ Music Midtown 2018 at Piedmont ParkSeptember 22                   East Aurora, NY @ Borderland Music FestivalSeptember 27                   Louisville, KY @ Iroquois AmphitheatreSeptember 28                   Indianapolis, IN @ Garfield ParkSeptember 29                   Kansas City, MO @ KC Power & LightOctober 2                           Pittsburg, PA @ Stage AEOctober 3                           Columbus, OH @ Express LiveOctober 5                           Black Mountain, NC @ Marcus Kind Band Family Reunion @ PigsahOctober 6                           Bloomingburg, NY @ Catskills Wine & Food FestivalOctober 20                        Dallas, TX @ Toyota Stadium National Soccer Hall of FameOctober 26                        New Orleans, LA @ Voodoo Music & Arts ExperienceOctober 28                        Live Oak, FL @ Suwanee HulaweenView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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How the gut got its villi

first_img Read Full Story “You are not just a ball of cells,” says Clifford Tabin, George Jacob and Jacqueline Hazel Leder Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School (HMS).The way cells organize within the human body allows us all to function the way we do, but a couple of Harvard professors are concerned as much with that developmental process as with the end result. Tabin shares a common perspective with L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), professor of organismic and evolutionary biology, and professor of physics.“When I teach medical students, they’re more interested in the rare people who are born with birth defects,” says Tabin. “They want to understand embryology so they understand how things go awry, but I’m more interested in the fact that for everyone sitting in my classroom—all 200 of those medical students and dental students—it went right! And every one of them has a heart on the left side and every one of them has two kidneys, and how the heck do you do that?”By taking steps back through embryos’ development, researchers in Mahadevan’s and Tabin’s laboratories investigated how the guts of several different animals end up as they do. Their findings, published in a recent issue of Science, reveal that the principles guiding the growth of intestinal structures called villi are surprisingly similar across chickens, frogs, mice, and snakes.last_img read more

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She Loves Me Leads Drama Desk Nominations

first_img‘She Loves Me'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Matthew Morrison and Vanessa Williams announced nominations for the 61st annual Drama Desk Awards on April 28. After the off-Broadway incarnation of Hamilton won big last year, She Loves Me topped the list with nine nods. American Psycho and Bright Star were close behind with eight and seven nominations, respectively. The awards ceremony, which honors the best of Broadway, off-Broadway and off-off-Broadway is scheduled to take place on June 5 at Town Hall, hosted by stage and screen favorite Michael Urie.The full list of nominees is as follows:Outstanding PlayThe ChristiansThe HumansJohnKing Charles IIIThe RoyaleOutstanding MusicalFirst Daughter SuiteDaddy Long LegsSchool of RockShuffle AlongWaitressOutstanding Revival of a PlayCloud NineDeath of a SalesmanHenry IVLong Day’s Journey Into NightA View From the BridgeWomen Without MenOutstanding Revival of a MusicalThe Color PurpleThe Golden BrideFiddler on the RoofShe Loves MeSpring AwakeningOutstanding Actor in a PlayAndrew Garman, The ChristiansAvi Hoffman, Death of a SalesmanFrank Langella, The FatherTim Pigott-Smith, King Charles IIIMark Strong, A View From the BridgeOutstanding Actress in a PlayGeorgia Engel, JohnMamie Gummer, Ugly Lies the BoneMarin Ireland, IronboundJessica Lange, Long Day’s Journey Into NightNicola Walker, A View From the BridgeOutstanding Actor in a MusicalDanny Burstein, Fiddler on the RoofRobert Creighton, CagneyMichael C. Hall, LazarusZachary Levi, She Loves MeBenjamin Walker, American PsychoOutstanding Actress in a MusicalLaura Benanti, She Loves MeCarmen Cusack, Bright StarCynthia Erivo, The Color PurpleJessie Mueller, WaitressAnnette O’Toole, Southern ComfortOutstanding Featured Actor in a PlayBill Camp, The CrucibleDavid Furr, Noises OffMatt McGrath, The Legend of Georgia McBrideRichard Thomas, Incident at VichyMichael Shannon, Long Day’s Journey Into NightOutstanding Featured Actress in a PlayBrooke Bloom, Cloud NineMegan Hilty, Noises OffKellie Overbey, Women Without MenSaycon Sengbloh, EclipsedJeanine Serralles, GloriaOutstanding Featured Actor in a MusicalNicholas Barasch, She Loves MeChristopher Fitzgerald, WaitressBaylee Littrell, Disaster!Paul Alexander Nolan, Bright StarA.J. Shively, Bright StarOutstanding Featured Actress in a MusicalDanielle Brooks, The Color PurpleAlison Fraser, First Daughter SuiteRachel Bay Jones, Dear Evan HansenJane Krakowski, She Loves MeMary Testa, First Daughter SuiteOutstanding Director of a PlayRachel Chavkin, The RoyaleSam Gold, JohnRupert Goold, King Charles IIIJoe Mantello, The HumansJenn Thompson, Women Without MenIvo van Hove, A View From the BridgeOutstanding Director of a MusicalMichael Arden, Spring AwakeningJohn Doyle, The Color PurpleRupert Goold, American PsychoBartlett Sher, Fiddler on the RoofBryna Wasserman, Motl Didner, The Golden BrideOutstanding ChoreographyJoshua Bergasse, CagneySpencer Liff, Spring AwakeningLynne Page, American PsychoRandy Skinner, Dames at SeaSavion Glover, Shuffle AlongOutstanding MusicSara Bareilles, WaitressMichael John LaChiusa, First Daughter SuiteAndrew Lloyd Webber, School of RockThe Lobbyists, SeaWife, Naked AngelsSteve Martin and Edie Brickell, Bright StarOutstanding LyricsSara Bareilles, WaitressBenj Pasek and Justin Paul, Dear Evan HansenGlenn Slater, School of RockMichael John LaChiusa, First Daughter SuiteOutstanding Book of a Musical:John Caird, Daddy Long LegsMichael John LaChiusa, First Daughter SuiteJessie Nelson, WaitressOutstanding OrchestrationsAugust Eriksmoen, Bright StarLarry Hochman, She Loves MeJoseph Joubert/Catherine Jayes, The Color PurpleAndrew Lloyd Webber, School of RockMichael Starobin/Bruce Coughlin, First Daughter SuiteOutstanding Music in a PlayBillie Joe Armstrong, These Paper Bullets!Estelle Bajou, Please Excuse My Dear Aunt SallyShaun Davey, PericlesPhilip Glass, The CrucibleTom Kitt, CymbelineOutstanding Set Design for a PlayRiccardo Hernandez, Red SpeedoMimi Lien, JohnG.W. Mercier, Head of PassesChristopher Oram, HughieDerek McLane, Fully CommittedOutstanding Set Design for a MusicalEs Devlin, American PsychoEmily Orling, Matt Saunders, Eric Farber, FuturityDavid Rockwell, She Loves MeOutstanding Costume Design for a PlayJessica Ford, These Paper Bullets!Martha Hally, Women Without MenConstance Hoffman, PericlesWilliam Ivey Long, Shows for DaysAnita Yavich, The Legend of Georgia McBrideOutstanding Costume Design for a MusicalJane Greenwood, Bright StarKatrina Lindsay, American PsychoJeff Mahshie, She Loves MeAlejo Vietti, AllegianceAnn Roth, Shuffle AlongOutstanding Lighting Design for a PlayNeil Austin, HughieMark Barton, JohnBradley King, Empanada LocaTyler Micoleau, Antlia PneumaticaJustin Townsend, The HumansOutstanding Lighting Design for a MusicalJane Cox, The Color PurpleJake DeGroot, SeaWifeBen Stanton, Spring AwakeningJustin Townsend, American PsychoJules Fisher/Peggy Eisenhauer, Shuffle AlongOutstanding Projection DesignNicholas Hussong, These Paper Bullets!Darrel Maloney, Tappin’ Thru LifePeter Nigrini, Dear Evan HansenFinn Ross, American PsychoTal Yarden, LazarusOutstanding Sound Design in a PlayFitz Patton, An Act of GodFitz Patton, The HumansMiles Polaski/Mikhail Fiksel, FulfillmentBray Poor, JohnRyan Rumery, Empanada LocaOutstanding Sound Design in a MusicalMick Potter, School of RockBrian Ronan, LazarusNevin Steinberg, Bright StarDan Moses Schreier, American PsychoScott Lehrer, Shuffle AlongOutstanding Wig and HairDavid Brian Brown, She Loves MeJason Hayes, The Legend of Georgia McBrideRobert-Charles Vallance, Women Without MenCharles G. LaPointe, The School for ScandalMia M. Neal, Shuffle AlongOutstanding Solo PerformanceSimon Callow, Tuesdays at Tesco’sKathleen Chalfant, RoseJames Lecesne, The Absolute Brightness of Leonard PelkeyDaphne Rubin-Vega, Empanada LocaJesse Tyler Ferguson, Fully CommittedUnique Theatrical ExperienceADA/AVAAntigonaThat Physics ShowThe Very Hungry Caterpillar ShowYOUARENOWHEREProductions with Multiple NominationsShe Loves Me – 9American Psycho – 8Bright Star – 7The Color Purple – 6First Daughter Suite – 6John – 6Shuffle Along – 6School of Rock – 5Waitress – 5Women Without Men – 5The Humans – 4Spring Awakening – 4A View from the Bridge – 4Dear Evan Hansen – 3Empanada Loca – 3Fiddler on the Roof – 3King Charles III – 3Lazarus – 3The Legend of Georgia McBride – 3Long Day’s Journey Into Night – 3These Paper Bullets! – 3Cagney – 2The Christians – 2Cloud Nine – 2The Crucible – 2Death of a Salesman – 2Fully Committed – 2The Golden Bride – 2Hughie – 2Noises Off – 2Pericles – 2The Royale – 2SeaWife – 2Special AwardsThe Humans – Special Drama Desk Award for Outstanding EnsembleCassie Beck, Reed Birney, Jayne Houdyshell, Lauren Klein, Arian Moayed, and Sarah Steele spend a very special Thanksgiving Day together in Stephen Karam’s play, reminding us that home is indeed where The Humans are. The Royale – Special Drama Desk Award for Outstanding EnsembleThe heavyweight cast of McKinley Belcher III, Khris Davis, Montego Glover, John Lavelle, and Clarke Peters gels as a unit in bringing Marco Ramirez’s story, inspired by Jack Johnson, to unforgettable life, offering a trenchant statement on racism in America.Sheldon Harnick – Special Drama Desk AwardNew productions of Fiddler on the Roof, Rothschild and Sons and She Loves Me this season remind us that this veteran lyricist’s takes on faith, family and community are as resonant as ever.Camp Broadway – Special Drama Desk AwardFor more than 20 years, this indispensable organization has introduced young people to the magic of theater. Camp Broadway plays a crucial role in creating tomorrow’s audiences.Danai Gurira – Sam Norkin AwardWhether writing about women in wartime Liberia in Eclipsed or about an affluent immigrant family from Zimbabwe struggling with assimilation in Familiar, Danai Gurira demonstrates great insight, range, and depth, bringing a fresh new voice to American theater. View Commentslast_img read more

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Tennessee-born kayaker makes second tallest waterfall descent on record

first_imgDays of heavy rain in WNC have caused 31 sewers to overflow, sending raw sewage into local waterways. “It all ends up in our creeks and rivers,” Hartwell Carson of French Broad Riverkeeper told 13 WLOS. “You might see it come into the street, it flows down the street, to the storm drain, to the creek.”  Thunberg was nominated by two Swedish lawmakers. Last year, Thunberg was nominated for the same prize by three Norwegian Parliament members. She was also named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” in 2019. Heavy rains cause storm sewer overflow in WNC Photo by Alejandro Soffia – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/ Read the story  here: https://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/teenage-climate-activist-greta-thunberg-nominated-nobel-peace-prize-n1128751 Jackson’s achievement now ranks as the second tallest waterfall descent on record behind Palouse Falls, Washington, USA. “This is what happens when obsession becomes reality,” Jackson said.   Climate activist Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prizecenter_img Read the story here: https://wlos.com/news/local/sewage-spills-heavy-rain-causes-nearly-3-dozen-sewers-to-overflow-in-wnc  Tennessee-born kayaker makes second tallest waterfall descent on record According to WLOS, the wet weather discharged ten times more water than average into sewer systems in early February. When sewage overflow occurs, the public is advised to think twice before paddling, swimming or fishing in the river.  Seventeen-year-old Greta Thunberg, the Swedish climate activist that has taken the world by storm, has been nominated for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize. Thunberg rose to fame by encouraging students to skip school to join protests demanding government action on climate change and founded the Fridays for Future movement. Last Friday, Tennessee-born kayaker Dane Jackson made the second tallest waterfall descent in known history down Chile’s 134-foot Salto del Maule waterfall. Jackson originally set his sights on Salto del Maule over five years ago and has spent years gathering knowledge of the ideal conditions to pull off such a feat. last_img read more

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The Japanese Invent An Android That Smiles

first_imgBy Dialogo April 09, 2010 Japanese researchers at the University of Osaka have introduced a humanoid robot that can laugh and smile, in addition to imitating a person’s facial expressions, a creation they will test in a hospital so that it can keep the sick company. Prof. Hiroshi Ishiguro, who has already imagined a family of robots with human faces, including one that is almost his clone, is satisfied with the naturalness of his new artificial woman. “A new technology always gives rise to fears and negative opinions,” he said. He added that his team wants to build robots with the capacity to express emotions. During a demonstration, the android, with long brown hair and dressed in a black skirt, smiled and wrinkled its forehead as a sign of irritation, almost simultaneously imitating a twenty-something woman who acted as its model. A camera filmed the young woman’s expressions and transmitted them to the robot using electrical signals. “I had the impression that I had a twin sister,” the model declared to reporters. “It smiles showing its teeth, which makes it really have a human appearance,” Ishiguro’s laboratory explained. It will be sold for around 10 million yen (108,000 dollars). Since the humanoid’s face, made of synthetic skin, does not have fully Japanese features, its inventors think that it will be easily accepted abroad. The android, named Geminoid-TMF, was commissioned by a hospital as an experiment, so that it can comfort patients and keep them company.last_img read more

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A New Way Insurers are Shifting Costs to the Sick

first_imgThis story was co-published with The New York Times’ The Upshot. Health insurance companies are no longer allowed to turn away patients because of their pre-existing conditions or charge them more because of those conditions. But some health policy experts say insurers may be doing so in a more subtle way: by forcing people with a variety of illnesses—including Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and epilepsy—to pay more for their drugs.Insurers have long tried to steer their members away from more expensive brand name drugs, labeling them as “non-preferred” and charging higher co-payments. But according to an editorial published Wednesday in the American Journal of Managed Care, several prominent health plans have taken it a step further, applying that same concept even to generic drugs.The Affordable Care Act bans insurance companies from discriminating against patients with health problems, but that hasn’t stopped them from seeking new and creative ways to shift costs to consumers. In the process, the plans effectively may be rendering a variety of ailments “non-preferred,” according to the editorial.“It is sometimes argued that patients should have ‘skin in the game’ to motivate them to become more prudent consumers,” the editorial says. “One must ask, however, what sort of consumer behavior is encouraged when all generic medicines for particular diseases are ‘non-preferred’ and subject to higher co-pays.”I recently wrote about the confusion I faced with my infant son’s generic asthma and allergy medication, which switched cost tiers from one month to the next. Until then, I hadn’t known that my plan charged two different prices for generic drugs. If your health insurer does not use such a structure, odds are that it will before long.The editorial comes several months after two advocacy groups filed a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights of the United States Department of Health and Human Services claiming that several Florida health plans sold in the Affordable Care Act marketplace discriminated against H.I.V. patients by charging them more for drugs.Specifically, the complaint contended that the plans placed all of their H.I.V. medications, including generics, in their highest of five cost tiers, meaning that patients had to pay 40 percent of the cost after paying a deductible. The complaint is pending.“It seems that the plans are trying to find this wiggle room to design their benefits to prevent people who have high health needs from enrolling,” said Wayne Turner, a staff lawyer at the National Health Law Program, which filed the complaint alongside the AIDS Institute of Tampa, Fla.Turner said he feared a “race to the bottom,” in which plans don’t want to be seen as the most attractive for sick patients. “Plans do not want that reputation.”In July, more than 300 patient groups, covering a range of diseases, wrote to Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the secretary of health and human services, saying they were worried that health plans were trying to skirt the spirit of the law, including how they handled co-pays for drugs.Generics, which come to the market after a name-brand drug loses its patent protection, used to have one low price in many insurance plans, typically $5 or $10. But as their prices have increased, sometimes sharply, many insurers have split the drugs into two cost groupings, as they have long done with name-brand drugs. “Non-preferred” generic drugs have higher co-pays, though they are still cheaper than brand-name drugs.With brand names, there’s usually at least one preferred option in each disease category. Not so for generics, the authors of the editorial found.One of the authors, Gerry Oster, a vice president at the consulting firm Policy Analysis, said he stumbled upon the issue much as I did. He went to his pharmacy to pick up a medication he had been taking for a couple of years. The prior month it cost him $5, but this time it was $20.As he looked into it, he came to the conclusion that this phenomenon was unknown even to health policy experts. “It’s completely stealth,” he said.In some cases, the difference in price between a preferred and non-preferred generic drug is a few dollars per prescription. In others, the difference in co-pay is $10, $15 or more.Even small differences in price can make a difference, though, the authors said. Previous research has found that consumers are less likely to take drugs that cost more out of pocket. “There’s very strong evidence for quite some time that even a $1 difference in out-of-pocket expenditures changes Americans’ behavior” regarding their use of medical services, said the other co-author, Dr. A. Mark Fendrick, a physician and director of the University of Michigan Center for Value-Based Insurance Design.Fendrick said the strategy also ran counter to efforts by insurance companies to tie physicians’ pay to their patients’ outcomes. “I am benchmarked on what my diabetic patients’ blood sugar control is,” he said. “I am benchmarked on whether my patients’ hypertension or angina” is under control, he said. Charging more for generic drugs to treat these conditions “flies directly in the face of a national movement to move from volume to value.”If there are no cheaper drugs offered, patients might just skip taking their pills, Fendrick said.The authors reviewed the drug lists, called formularies, of six prescription drugs plans: Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Massachusetts; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan; Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois; Geisinger Health Plan in Pennsylvania; Aetna; and Premera Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alaska. They wanted to see how each plan handled expert-recommended generic drugs for 10 conditions.The conditions are not all high cost like H.I.V. and Parkinson’s. They also include migraine headaches, community acquired pneumonia and high blood pressure.Premera and Aetna had preferred generic drugs for each of the 10 conditions the authors examined. Harvard Pilgrim, a nonprofit often considered among the nation’s best, did not have a lower-cost generic in any of the 10 categories.Four of the six plans had no preferred generic antiretroviral medication for patients with H.I.V.In a statement to ProPublica, Harvard Pilgrim said it charges more for some generics because they are more expensive. The cheapest generics carry a $5 co-payment for a 30-day supply. More expensive generics range from $10 to $25, or 20 percent of the cost for a 30-day supply. The health plan said its members pay less for their medications than the industry average.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois said that its preferred generics had no co-payment at all, and that non-preferred generics cost $10. “We historically only had one tier of generic drugs at a $10 co-pay,” the spokeswoman Mary Ann Schultz said in an email.The Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan spokeswoman Helen Stojic said the editorial looked only at its drug plan for Medicare patients, which the government closely regulates. Under Medicare, patients can appeal a drug’s tier and seek to pay a lower co-payment, she said.Geisinger did not respond to questions.Health plans that participate in Medicare’s prescription drug program, known as Part D, have been moving rapidly to create two tiers of generic drugs. This year, about three-quarters of plans had them, according to an article co-written by Jack Hoadley, a health policy analyst at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute. The practical effect of such arrangements probably varies based on the difference in cost, he said.Dan Mendelson, chief executive of Avalere Health, a consulting firm, has studied the way in which health insurers structure their benefits. He said the increasing number of drug tiers in some plans was confusing for patients.“Consumers often don’t understand which drugs are where,” he said. “They don’t understand the purpose of tiering. They just get to the pharmacy counter and it gets done to them.”Have you experienced price confusion at the pharmacy? Email Charles Ornstein to let him know about what happened. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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When Abortion Was Illegal Here’s What Happened in Trump’s Old Neighborhood

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Pat FalkRepublican presidential front-runner Donald Trump’s shifting position on abortion can be seen as pandering, a changing sensibility, or the kind of flippancy that characterizes so much of his rhetoric. It doesn’t really matter. The problem is that focusing on his inconsistency distracts us from the heart of the abortion controversy, which is what happens to women when abortion is denied.When there is no safe and legal abortion, women are often forced into “backstreet” abortions. Doctors or other abortion providers in those cases—either inept or fearful of legal consequences—may be compelled to act in unprofessional ways. We have scores of examples from the past that show the sheer horror of what could happen.Here is one story that hits close to home, Trump’s and mine.In 1962, a few blocks from where both Trump and I grew up in Jamaica Estates, a 19-year-old college sophomore, Barbara Lofrumento, died during an abortion. The doctor, Harvey Lothringer, cut her up and ground the pieces in a garbage disposal. Barbara’s mother, who had been waiting in an adjacent room for hours, was sent home.“Everything will be fine,” Dr. Lothringer told her. “Barbara’s resting. I’m giving her oxygen, just as a precaution.”It would be days before Barbara’s parents alerted the police. They were scared—they were doing something illegal. Meanwhile, Dr. Lothringer and his assistant/girlfriend Theresa Carillo had left the country, but not before arranging for a plumbing service to come to his house to flush out his system. When Roto-Rooter eventually showed up two days later, they found an overflowing sewer, the pipes clogged with Barbara’s gruesome remains.This is the epicenter of an atrocity that radiated outward to a shocked public, sinking deeply into the psyche of a generation.Harvey Lothringer was my doctor, my family doctor. I had been on that same table for an extensive examination a few days before Barbara died. My father was also Dr. Lothringer’s initial defense attorney. At 11-years-old, I was my father’s helper, cutting out articles and photos from a sea of newspapers. I would stare at Barbara’s photo: her head turned to the side, raised slightly, her dark, curly hair cut short, framing her face. Her smile seemed forced, her eyes sad.That photo—with her image intact—etched itself into my consciousness in stark contrast to her fragmentation. If I could just piece together the story, tape up the fragments, I could put her back together. I could staunch some of the unbelievable horror. At the very least, I might begin to understand.These images have haunted me for decades. It took me months, for example, to agree to surgery for early stage lung cancer a few years ago. I was that terrified of doctors wielding knives.It’s been this way for others. New York State Assemb. Deborah Glick (D-Manhattan) was also a vulnerable 11-year-old in Queens when she first heard the news. When we talked at her Union Square office recently, she told me that the story had “seared itself” into her memory. Finally, in January of 2014, she brought the personal directly into the political as she recounted on the Assembly floor what had happened to Barbara and argued for a provision to update New York’s Women’s Equality Act.Also traumatized were Barbara’s classmates at the College of New Rochelle, especially Janice Decker, a writer now residing on the West Coast. Like Glick and countless others, she was instructed “not to talk about it.” A few weeks after Barbara’s murder, Decker was raped. Finding herself pregnant, Decker thought, “No legal abortion available. What now? Barbara had been erased with finality. Her death and the ensuing silence was proof that no one would help me.”So, let’s stop playing games, hopscotching “positions” on the issue of reproductive rights, as Donald Trump is trying to do as he leads the race for the Republican presidential nomination.  Let’s talk about how women are being forced into backstreet abortions across the country.  Let’s acknowledge the insidious effects on us all.Even now, when access to abortion is a constitutional right, “87 percent of the counties in the U.S. have no abortion providers,” points out former Boston Globe journalist Eileen McNamara, professor at Brandeis University. Increasing numbers of state legislatures, she warns, are making it difficult for clinics to operate.“Where,” she asks, “will women go?”Let us hope it will be to a place of safety.Pat Falk is professor emeritus at Nassau Community College in Garden City, NY.  Author of four previous books, she is currently completing the memoir, The Story of Barbara: Memory of a Botched Abortion.last_img read more

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Children Produce Weaker Coronavirus Antibodies, Study Finds

first_imgNeither group of children had antibodies to a viral protein called the nucleocapsid, or N, that is entangled with the genetic material of the virus. Because this protein is found within the virus and not on its surface, the immune system would only see it and make antibodies to it if the virus were widely disseminated in the body, she said.“You don’t really see any of that in the children, and that suggests that there’s really a reduced infection course if these kids are getting infected,” she explained.The finding could undermine the results from tests designed to pick up antibodies to the N protein of the virus. Many antibody tests, including those made by Abbott and Roche and offered by Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp, are specific to the N antibodies and so may miss children who have successfully cleared the virus. “That’s absolutely an interesting implication of that finding,” Dr. Brodin said.Lower levels of virus in the body would also explain why children seem generally to transmit the virus less efficiently than adults do. Children infected with the coronavirus produce weaker antibodies and fewer types of them than adults do, suggesting they clear their infection much faster, according to a new study published Thursday.Other studies have suggested that an overly strong immune response may be to blame in people who get severely ill or die from Covid-19. A weaker immune response in children may paradoxically indicate that they vanquish the virus before it has had a chance to wreak havoc in the body, and may help explain why children are mostly spared severe symptoms of Covid, the disease caused by the coronavirus. It may also show why they are less likely to spread the virus to others.- Advertisement – The study looked at children’s antibody levels at a single point in time, and was too small to provide insights into how the levels may vary with age. But it could pose questions for certain antibody tests that may be missing children who have been infected.Dr. Farber and her colleagues analyzed antibodies to the coronavirus in four groups of patients: 19 adult convalescent plasma donors who had recovered from Covid without being hospitalized; 13 adults hospitalized with acute respiratory distress syndrome resulting from severe Covid; 16 children hospitalized with multi-system inflammatory syndrome, the rare condition affecting some infected children; and 31 infected children who did not have the syndrome. About half of this last group of children had no symptoms at all.Individuals in each group had antibodies, consistent with other studies showing that the vast majority of people infected with the coronavirus mount a robust immune response.- Advertisement – “This further emphasizes that this viral infection in itself, and the immune response to this virus, is not that different from what we would expect” from any virus, said Petter Brodin, an immunologist at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. “They may be infectious for a shorter time,” said Donna Farber, an immunologist at Columbia University in New York who led the study reported in the journal Nature Immunology.Having weaker and fewer antibodies does not mean that children would be more at risk of re-infections, other experts said. But the range of antibodies differed between children and adults. The children made primarily one type of antibody, called IgG, that recognizes the spike protein on the surface of the virus. Adults, by contrast, made several types of antibodies to the spike and other viral proteins, and these antibodies were more powerful at neutralizing the virus.Children had “less of a protective response, but they also had less of a breadth of an antibody response,” Dr. Farber said. “It’s because those kids are just not getting infected as severely.”center_img Another possibility is that the children have some protection — in the form of immune cells called memory T cells — from previous encounters with common cold coronaviruses.“Is it all innate? Or could there actually be some pre-existing memory?” Dr. Bhattacharya said. “I think those are both possible.” “You don’t really need a huge, overly robust immune response to maintain protections over some period of time,” said Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “I don’t know that I would be especially worried that kids have a little bit lower antibody response.”- Advertisement – But experts urged some caution in interpreting the results because they represent samples taken from people at a single point in time.Samples from the more severely affected children and adults were collected within 24 to 36 hours of being admitted or intubated for respiratory failure; those from children with mild or no symptoms were banked after medical procedures.The type of antibodies produced by the body varies over the time course of an infection. This was a limitation of this study because the researchers may have been comparing people at different points in their infection, Dr. Brodin said. “You risk comparing apples and oranges.”Other experts cautioned that the study was too small to draw conclusions about how the immune response may vary in children of different ages. The children in the study ranged in age from 3 to 18 years, with a median age of 11. But some studies have suggested that teenagers may be just as much at risk from the coronavirus as adults.“It’s very important to understand what happens in children,” to understand the nature of their illness, but also how they contribute to spread of the virus in the community, said Dr. Maria L. Gennaro, an immunologist at Rutgers University. But “to try and stratify by age, it’s a little bit of a stretch in the analysis,” she said.The researchers were also not able to explain why children have a more limited antibody response.Having fewer types of antibodies may seem like a bad thing, but “having a ton of antibody isn’t necessarily a marker of a good thing,” said Dr. Bhattacharya. “It usually means that something went wrong early in the response.”At least one other study has suggested that children have a powerful inborn immune system, intended to combat the many new pathogens they encounter, and that this first line of defense may clear the infection early without needing to rely on later antibodies. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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UN warns of dangerous drop in vaccinations during COVID pandemic

first_imgMost problems were linked to a lack of sufficient personal protection equipment (PPE) for health workers, travel restrictions, and low health worker staffing levels – all of which led to immunization services being curbed or shut down.At least 30 measles vaccination campaigns have been or are at risk of being cancelled, threatening new outbreaks of the contagious viral disease this year and beyond, the report said.Measles outbreaks were already on the rise, infecting nearly 10 million people in 2018 and killing 140,000 of them – mostly children, according to WHO data.For diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, preliminary data for the first four months of 2020 “points to a substantial drop” in the number of children getting all three doses of the DTP vaccine that protects against them, the report said – the first time in 28 years that the world could see a fall in coverage for this routine childhood immunization.Data for 2019 showed that nearly 14 million children worldwide missed out on life-saving vaccines. Most of these children live in Africa and are likely to lack access to other health services, the report said.It said progress on immunization was already stalling before the new coronavirus emerged and spread around the world, but the pandemic made a bad situation worse. Levels of childhood immunizations against dangerous diseases such as measles, tetanus and diphtheria have dropped alarmingly during the COVID-19 pandemic, putting millions of children at risk, United Nations agencies said on Wednesday.”The avoidable suffering and death caused by children missing out on routine immunizations could be far greater than COVID-19 itself,” World Health Organization (WHO) director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a joint report with UNICEF.Three-quarters of the 82 countries that responded to a survey for the report said they had suffered coronavirus-related disruptions to their immunization programs as of May 2020. Topics :last_img read more