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Now is time to ban AR-15 assault rifles

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe NRA is a special interest group designed to spread fear and create profit for U.S. gun manufacturers. It has nothing to do with the Second Amendment. We should ban AR-15 semi-automatic assault style weapons immediately. The U.S. Supreme Court has found that ownership of certain “banned” weapons under Federal Law 26 USCA 5681 doesn’t violate the Second Amendment.The current popular weapon of choice in school shootings and mass murders in the United States is the AR-15-style weapon. According to pro-gun survivalist website www.armsbearingcitizen.com, the AR-15 is the citizen’s weapon of choice because, “the caliber itself has a much higher velocity than the 22 Long Rifle. It’s used by most law enforcement agencies and the military for a reason. … [it] has stopping power for survival and urban warfare …”So, what does that mean? Wired magazine published a June 17, 2016, interview with emergency room trauma physician Peter Rhee. It goes into detail about the damage done to a human body from these weapons. The bullet from a handgun is slow compared to that of an AR-15. The AR-15 bullet “has so much energy that it can disintegrate three inches of leg bone, it would turn to dust…the exit wound can be …a jagged hole the size of an orange.”Finally, “…[a] wound from a handgun might require only one surgery, but an AR-15 bullet wound might require three to ten.”The AR-15 style weapons are easy to shoot, have minimal kickback, and are designed for maximum damage and death. There’s no reason in a sane society that these weapons should be available and legal to our citizens. The NRA pawns in Washington continue to have our children’s blood on their hands. It’s time to legally ban these weapons now.Michael WinnSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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PREMIUMMonash is first—Australian universities are coming to Indonesia

first_imgLOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Facebook In the not so distant future, you will no longer need to apply for a visa and fly south to study at some top Australian universities. With the ratification of a landmark trade deal with Canberra, the government has decided to bring them here instead. Indonesia is open to foreign colleges. But the trade pact, ratified by the House of Representatives earlier this month, allows the government to further relax its rules regarding the establishment of local branches of Australian universities. The first Australian university to announce its Indonesian branch is Monash University, a Melbourne-based public university, which will only offer Master and PhD degrees, as well as executive programs and micro-credentials.The university is scheduled to begin short executive programs later this year and plans the first intake of Masters students in late 2021.Read also: Australi… Google Log in with your social account Forgot Password ? Topics : university Monash-University Indonesia Education Australialast_img read more

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Three injured, hundreds of houses damaged after magnitude-4.9 earthquake in West Java

first_imgA magnitude-4.9 earthquake rocking some western parts of West Java on Tuesday afternoon injured at least three people and damaged more than 200 houses across the province.According to the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG), the earthquake struck at 5:18 p.m. on Tuesday, with an epicenter located 13 kilometers northwest of Sukabumi regency at a depth of 10 km.#Gempa Mag:5.0, 10-Mar-20 17:18:05 WIB, Lok:6.89 LS,106.62 BT (13 km TimurLaut KAB-SUKABUMI-JABAR), Kedlmn:10 Km, tdk berpotensi tsunami #BMKG pic.twitter.com/ovcZaLer1E— BMKG (@infoBMKG) March 10, 2020Rahmat Triyono, the head of the tsunami and earthquake division at the BMKG, said the quake would not cause a tsunami because the epicenter was under land. West Java Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD Jawa Barat) operational control manager Budi Budiman Wahyu said there were no fatalities caused by the incident. However, three people in Mekarsari village, Kalapanunggal district, Sukabumi suffered minor injuries.“The victims were brought to a nearby clinic in the village. They have received treatment,” Budi told The Jakarta Post via text message on Tuesday.The disaster agency recorded that at least 202 houses were damaged during the earthquake. The most affected region was Kalapanunggal district, where 48 houses were destroyed or severely damaged, while 154 others suffered from minor to moderate damage.BPBD Jawa Barat also reported damage in other districts, such as Parakansalak, Cidahu and Kabandungan.“As many as 173 individuals were displaced by the incident,” Budi said.BMKG’s Rahmat said the shallow earthquake occurred on a strike-slip fault, where two tectonic plates moved in parallel but in opposite directions to one another.The earthquake was also felt in Bogor and several parts of Jakarta, the BMKG reported. (nal)Topics :last_img read more

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Skipping meals, on-the-go options and fry-ups: 10 charts explaining UK attitudes to breakfast

first_imgOn-the-go breakfast items are enjoying a surge in popularity. Kantar data shows ‘breakfast alternatives’, which include cereal bars, breakfast biscuits and toaster pastries, rose 5.4% to £466m in the past year. According to its figures, cereal bars make up three quarters of that market.Our consumer poll bears that out. When it comes to convenient on-the-go options, cereal bars are leading the way in popularity. Indeed, they were the top option among all ages except 45 to 54-year-olds, who named fruit as their preferred option.Among the total sample, fruit followed closely behind cereal bars. Breakfast biscuits were in third place, just slightly ahead of pastries and breakfast drinks. The sheer number of people buying into the top five options shows there is room for a variety of on-the-go options.While convenience is the most vital attribute in this arena, Mondelez’s Nash says a successful product must also take into account other trends.“Taste is still a highly important purchasing factor, and consumers are becoming more health-conscious when it comes to breakfast too,” she says.5. A quarter of Londoners eat a cooked breakfast every day Given that younger consumers are harder pressed for time (and lie-ins) it’s no wonder they are fuelling the on-the-go market. Nearly a fifth of 25 to 34-year-olds eat breakfast on the go every day and half will do so at least once a week. That figure falls to just 6% of 65-plus consumers.Susan Nash, trade communications manager at Mondelez International, says this is down to younger consumers leading “increasingly busy and diverse lifestyles”. “This means the breakfast occasion is expanding, taking place at any time from early morning up until lunch and anywhere from home, at the office or on the go,” she explains.Indeed, Kantar data shows a 32.8% increase in ‘carried-out breakfasts’ – defined as take-home items that are bought to be consumed out of the home – to 349 million occasions in the past year [52 w/e 21 April 2019].4. Cereal bars are the most popular on-the-go option It’s no surprise that ‘filling’ was named one of the main priorities for breakfast. ‘Feeling ready to start the day’ and ‘gives me energy’ come a close second and third.Mondelez says the high importance of energy is why many consumers are looking for ‘slow release’ breakfast options. “Consumers are absolutely looking for breakfast options that will keep them full and raise their energy levels until lunchtime,” says Nash.There are certain demographics who will appreciate this benefit more than others. Among the 25 to 34-year-old age group, 55% wanted a breakfast that gave them energy. That compares with 43% of 45 to 54-year-olds.Health was another important motivation, cited by nearly a quarter of respondents. Here, there was a gender divide – 27% of women said it was important compared to 17% of men.8. Fibre is more important to older consumers You might expect Londoners to be shunning cooked breakfasts. After all, their hectic schedules make them more likely than other regions to skip the meal altogether.Yet somehow, nearly a quarter of the capital’s residents manage to cram in a hot breakfast every morning. That compares to just 3% in Wales and 5% in the east and west Midlands.That’s perhaps down to the sheer number of on-the-go hot options available in London. Pret’s menu includes a poached egg, sausage and beans power pot, while Eat offers a pot with BBQ beans, poached egg, avocado mash and feta.Another interesting point to note is the age split. A fifth of 25 to 34-year-olds eat a cooked breakfast every day, compared to just 4% of the 45 to 54-year-old age group.6. The fry-up is the most popular hot breakfast For many, skipping breakfast sounds like a recipe for a rumbling stomach. Not everyone feels this way, though. Nearly half of the 738 respondents who skip breakfast do so because they simply don’t feel hungry.Still, the motivation varies fairly significantly by age. Older generations are more likely to forgo their breakfast because they don’t have hunger pangs. Meanwhile, younger consumers are more likely to skip the first meal of the day due to time constraints.Nearly half of 16 to 24-year-olds who miss breakfast do so because they say they don’t have enough time. That compares with just a fifth of over-65s.Similarly, 17% of the youngest age group say their primary motivation is to have more time in bed. By contrast, only 4% of over-65s said the same.3. Younger consumers are more likely to eat breakfast on the go Could fibre be the new protein? Dieticians believe so. Especially as the average Brit consumes just 18g of fibre a day – half the recommended intake of 30g.But when it comes to breakfast, younger consumers simply aren’t buying the fibre message. Only 31% of the youngest age group said fibre was important to them in a breakfast option, compared to 56% of over-65s.By contrast, older generations seemed less fussed about protein, which was a primary concern among 25 to 34-year-olds.There are some interesting demographic differences outside of age, too. Londoners seemed hotter on nutritional content as a whole.Fibre and protein were both important to nearly half of respondents in the capital. Yet up in Scotland, only 34% wanted fibre and 26% thought protein was important.Overall, fibre and protein were the main considerations when it came to nutritional content. But there were other factors at play. More than a quarter of respondents cited calorie content as important and 23% said the same for vitamin content. Plus, a fifth were concerned with the amount of sugar in their breakfast.Again, all of these elements were particularly important to respondents living in London.9. Parents are particularly concerned about a healthy breakfast 1. A quarter of consumers always skip breakfastcenter_img Parents are typically a time-pressed bunch. So much so that they are more likely to skip breakfast altogether than those without children.But when they do make an effort, they are generally concerned over what they are putting into their bodies. Nearly half of parents deemed it very important for their breakfast to be healthy, while just over a quarter of child-free respondents said the same.It comes as no surprise to Mondelez. “Consumers want to start their day with a breakfast option that is nutritious and gives them sustenance,” says Nash. “This especially applies to parents who want healthier options for the whole family.”Parents aren’t the only ones who are overly concerned with health. Nutrition-conscious Londoners are also more likely to want a virtuous breakfast. A whopping 58% said a healthy breakfast was very important to them.Younger consumers are also more likely to value a healthy breakfast. It was very important to 44% of 25 to 34-year-olds, compared to 25% of those aged 55 to 64.10. Thirty and forty-somethings are more likely to make breakfast their healthiest meal The bad news? Nearly a quarter of Brits skip breakfast every day. The good news? Time-pressed consumers are fuelling the market for on-the-go options. Products that tick the health and convenience boxes are booming – but there’s still plenty of love for a full English.This research was commissioned by The Grocer and carried out by Kantar’s Research Express service independently from Mondelez International,Free download: 10 charts explaining UK attitudes to breakfast With all the buzz around avocado toast, you may expect it to have surpassed the full English as the nation’s favourite hot breakfast option. That couldn’t be further from the truth.The fry-up remains the most popular option by far, taking the top position among more than four in 10 respondents. Meanwhile, avocado toast is lingering in fifth place, as only 5% of respondents named it their favourite hot breakfast.Interestingly, this doesn’t differ much by age group.The stereotypically avocado-loving younger generation is just as keen on a fry-up as their older counterparts. A sizeable 41% of 25 to 34-year-olds named the full English their favourite, a sentiment that was replicated by exactly the same percentage of 65-plus consumers. The avocado toast isn’t that much more popular among younger generations, either – named a favourite by 6% of 25 to 34s compared to 3% of over-65s.7. Energy is a high priority for breakfast Breakfast may be deemed the most important meal of the day, but many consumers aren’t taking note.Nearly a quarter always skip the breakfast occasion, according to our poll, and a further quarter will give it a miss once or twice a week. That means 44% regularly refrain from eating in the morning – higher than the 43% who will never give up their breakfast.There are some demographic differences in this behaviour. Time-pressed parents are more likely than most to go hungry in the morning. A sizeable 27% say they always skip breakfast, compared to 20% of non-parents.In terms of regions, busy Londoners are more likely than the rest of the country to go without. Just over a quarter miss the occasion every day, compared to 18% in the north east of England.But the most likely to miss the meal are the 35 to 44-year-old age group. A whopping 30% of this demographic will always skip the occasion, compared to just 12% of over-65s.This largely retired group is a particular champion of breakfast, perhaps because they have more time to enjoy the meal. Indeed, two thirds of the 65-plus age group say they never miss out on brekkie.2. That’s mostly because they don’t feel hungry Overall, just 19% of consumers say breakfast is their healthiest meal of the day. Four in 10 say there is no difference between meal times, while 21% are healthiest at lunch and 20% make their biggest effort at dinner.But there is one demographic that leans heavily towards breakfast: 35 to 44-year-olds. Three in 10 of them make their first meal of the day the healthiest of all.Consumers who work are also more likely to start off the day in a virtuous way. Nearly a quarter of consumers who work make breakfast their healthiest meal, compared to 14% of consumers who don’t work.Considering working consumers are also far more likely to eat breakfast options on the go, it shows just how much potential there is for healthy, convenient options,Downloads10 Charts_Breakfast_Digital PDFPDF, Size 7.23 mb,Mondelez Internationallast_img read more

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Shelbyville Man Tries to Buy Car Using Prop Money

first_imgSHELBYVILLE, Ind. — A Shelby County man was arrested after he allegedly used movie prop money to buy a car on Craigslist.Austin Davis, 18, was charged with auto theft and counterfeiting.According to court documents, a couple listed their black Nissan 350Z for $10,000 on Craigslist.Davis contacted the couple about the car, and they set up a meeting for May 16 at 8 p.m.When Davis arrived, he paid the couple a stack of $100 bills for the car.As they were counting the cash, Davis left the premises with the car.At that point, the couple realized the money was fake, and it had “FOR MOTION PICTURE USE ONLY” printed on the back.The couple tried to follow Davis, but they lost track of him.The couple called police to report a vehicle theft.An officer quickly spotted Davis in the black Nissan, and the officer initiated a traffic stop.The officer asked Davis to step out of the car, and he complied.The officer asked Davis to take his hands out of his pockets, and at that time, Davis placed his wallet and a banded stack of cash on the hood of the car.The officer took Davis into custody.According to court documents, Davis told police that he only planned to test drive the car, but when he got there he decided to use the fake money.last_img read more

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House supports bill to make interfering with fire scenes a crime

first_imgStatehouse—The Indiana House of Representatives Tuesday voted in favor of legislation co-authored by State Rep. Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) that would make interfering with fire scenes a crime. Frye said the proposal for a law would establish penalties for entering a crime scene firefighters marked off with barrier tape or for interfering with the work of firefighters. He said it is already against the law to intentionally interfere with law enforcement, and this legislation expands the law to include firefighters.“Firefighters, just like police, are critical to public safety,” Frye said. “They need the ability to prevent tampering of crime scenes and keep key pieces of evidence intact for detectives and investigators. This bill would further help law enforcement and keep the public out of dangerous areas.”The Indiana Fire Chiefs Association, the Indiana Volunteer Firefighters Association, the Professional Firefighters Union of Indiana and the Indiana Fraternal Order of Police support this legislation, which is a product of the House Veterans Affairs and Public Safety Committee chaired by Frye.House Bill 1032 now moves to the Senate for further consideration. Visit iga.in.gov to learn more.last_img read more

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Ellsworth girls’ basketball team hands MDI 1st loss with late comeback

first_img Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. Bio Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 BAR HARBOR — For Ellsworth basketball players, fans and coaches, waiting 14-plus years was long enough.Many changes occurred in Hancock County’s lone city between Dec. 23, 2004, and Thursday. In that time span, 14 senior classes graduated from Ellsworth High School, and the city celebrated 250 years as a settlement as its population grew by more than 1,000 people. Yet not once during those 5,131 days did the Ellsworth girls’ basketball team beat Mount Desert Island.In fact, some freshmen on this year’s Ellsworth squad weren’t even a year old when the Eagles last defeated MDI. Against an undefeated opponent, those players got to celebrate an accomplishment none of their predecessors had achieved in more than a decade.Ellsworth came back from a nine-point deficit in the second half Thursday to beat the MDI girls for the first time in more than 14 years. The result marked a big step forward for the Eagles, who sent the Trojans to their first loss of the season.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“To get over that hump in a game like this and beat a good team and good program like MDI is huge,” Ellsworth head coach Andy Pooler said. “It’s one of those wins that can carry you a long way.”Ellsworth’s Samantha Carter (left) and Sierra Andrews defend against MDI’s Alexis Clarito during the first half of a high school girls’ basketball game Jan. 10 in Bar Harbor. The Trojans’ 31 points against Ellsworth marked the team’s fewest in a game since Jan. 21, 2012. BARRY GUTRADT PHOTOMDI (8-1) outscored Ellsworth 12-6 in the first quarter and held the Eagles to just four points in the second to take a 19-10 lead into halftime. That score came via strong early efforts from Maddy Candage, who scored five points in the opening eight minutes, and Hannah Chamberlain, whose nine points in the half included two 3-pointers.Yet Ellsworth would begin its comeback in the third quarter, after which the Eagles (8-2) had cut MDI’s lead to 27-23. Later, with just over a minute left in the fourth, a Kylie Robidoux basket gave the visitors their first lead of the game at 32-31.After an MDI turnover in the final minute, Trinity Montigny made a free throw to put Ellsworth ahead 33-31. On the Trojans’ next possession, Montigny stole the ball, ran the length of the floor and laid it in off the glass as time expired while her teammates celebrated at midcourt.“I didn’t realize there was no time left until I looked up and saw zeros on the scoreboard,” Montigny said. “It happened so fast in the moment. When we went back to the locker room, that’s when it hit me.”Montigny was the top scorer for Ellsworth with 13 points, and Robidoux added 10 for the victorious Eagles. Chamberlain had a team-high 13 for MDI, and Candage and Julia Watras provided eight and seven, respectively.Ellsworth’s comeback presented a stark contrast to what happened when it came to Bar Harbor for the 2017-18 regular season finale. In that game, the Eagles held the lead for much of the first half before an MDI run sent them to a crushing defeat.“You want to keep yourself positive when you’re out there playing, so I wasn’t really thinking about that,” Montigny said. “We were focused on this moment right now, and that’s what helped us come back.”Ellsworth’s next game will come on the road against Belfast (0-10) at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12. MDI is scheduled to host Orono (4-7) at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14.Ellsworth and MDI are set to meet again in the Feb. 6 regular season finale, and the Eagles are well aware the Trojans will come into that contest motivated after Thursday’s result. Yet after finally ending its hex against MDI, Ellsworth will enter that game and the remaining contests leading up to it with confidence of its own.“People say, ‘Oh, Ellsworth always loses to MDI,’ but you have to start somewhere,” Robidoux said. “We know we can compete with good teams and rise above because we just did it, and that’s why it was such a great win.”center_img MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Latest Postslast_img read more

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Ellsworth girls’ soccer team beats Foxcroft for 1st playoff win since 2012

first_img MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 Biocenter_img Latest Posts DOVER-FOXCROFT — Unable to produce chances near the net, the Ellsworth girls’ soccer team worked its magic from long distance.Early on in Friday’s Class B North preliminary round game, Ellsworth found itself flummoxed against a Foxcroft midfield that controlled possession and prevented the Eagles from making their way toward goal. Even when Ellsworth did have the ball, the Ponies stayed calm and composed to cut off the visitors’ potential scoring threats.With 20 minutes gone, though, Ellsworth began to make its way into the final third. Although Foxcroft gave the Eagles a minuscule amount of space in the attacking half, that turned out to be all the visitors needed to score the goals that would secure a long-awaited playoff victory.Ellsworth got its first playoff win in seven years Friday with a 3-0 road victory over Foxcroft in the Class B North prelims. The result came as Addi Laslie and Sierra Andrews broke open a scoreless game with long-range goals in the first half before Paige Sawyer provided the third and final tally early in the second.Ellsworth’s Paige Sawyer passes during the first half of a girls’ soccer playoff game against Foxcroft on Oct. 25 in Dover-Foxcroft. Sawyer came within inches of a goal for the Eagles with a shot off the crossbar in the first half before scoring the team’s third and final goal in the second. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLThis is placeholder textThis is placeholder text“It feels awesome,” Ellsworth head coach Katye Lacasse said. “The girls knew it had been a while since this team has won in the playoffs, and that definitely motivated them. They really took advantage of this opportunity.”Ninth-ranked Ellsworth (6-8-1) got off to a slow start to the game as Foxcroft controlled possession and forced the Eagles to chase the ball in their own half. Yet Ellsworth’s back four maintained its shape and limited the home team to a pair of harmless through balls, both of which goalkeeper Kayla Duhaime collected without breaking a sweat.Midway through the first half, Ellsworth found its rhythm in the midfield and began to put No. 8 Foxcroft (5-9-1) on the back foot. The Eagles nearly scored the opener on a thunderous shot from Sawyer with 21 minutes left in the period, but the ball hit the crossbar and took an improbable bounce away from goal that allowed the Ponies to make an easy clearance.Fifteen minutes before halftime, though, Ellsworth’s offensive pressure paid off as Laslie curled a shot from well outside the 18-yard box into the bottom-right corner to put the visitors ahead 1-0. The Eagles made it a two-goal cushion seven minutes later through Andrews, who found the same corner from nearly the same spot on the pitch.“The defense was pressuring me, and I knew had to get the ball off my foot,” Andrews said. “I wasn’t even thinking about the distance because I had to shoot it right then. I guess I hit it just right.”Ellsworth continued to dictate the game in the second half and stretched the lead to 3-0 with 31 minutes, 59 seconds left with a goal from Sawyer. Foxcroft’s defense prevented the Eagles from scoring the rest of the way, but Ellsworth withstood the Ponies’ late pushes forward to keep a clean sheet and advance in comfortable fashion.Ellsworth’s Addi Laslie battles Foxcroft’s Cadence Herrick for the ball during the second half of a girls’ soccer playoff game Oct. 25 in Dover-Foxcroft. Laslie scored the first goal of the game for Ellsworth in the first half with a long-range shot to the bottom-right corner. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLThis encounter with Foxcroft was the second of the year for Ellsworth, which beat the Ponies 7-1 when the two teams met Sept. 26. Yet even as they prepared to battle an opponent they had already beaten in decisive fashion, the Eagles were not about to take this game lightly.“We knew it wasn’t going to be handed to us,” Andrews said. “You can’t think like that. We knew we were going to have to work really hard in practice and all game long today, and that’s what we did.”In the days leading up to the game, Ellsworth players dyed their hair a hot-pink color in a display of team unity. That unity became clear on the pitch as the Eagles overcame a much-improved Foxcroft team to earn their biggest win yet.“We just wanted to do something to show we were together as a team,” Laslie said. “We went with pink because of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.”Ellsworth’s next game will be a regional quarterfinal showdown against No. 1 Hermon (14-0) at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, at Hermon High School. The Hawks defeated the Eagles by scores of 1-0 and 5-1 in the regular season.A win would send Ellsworth to the regional semifinals, where it would face No. 4 Presque Isle (9-4-1) or No. 5 John Bapst (9-4-1). Beating Hermon to get there will be a challenge, but after Friday’s win, the Eagles will be plenty confident.“We wanted to make it back to the playoffs and win this time, and we’re so happy we could,” Laslie said. “We’re going to keep fighting.” Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all)last_img read more

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Syracuse freshman class sparks offense, offers glimpse at future in loss to Seminoles

first_img Related Stories Klinger: Syracuse Freshmen prove the kids are all right Syracuse had just lost by three scores to the defending national champions.Its starting quarterback is out for the next month, its second-stringer left the game with what appeared to be a head injury and the Orange now has to win four of its last six games to clinch bowl eligibility this season.But a confident AJ Long stepped to the podium after the Orange’s loss to Florida State and made a bold statement.“Syracuse football, we’re back,” the freshman quarterback said, “and we’re going to an ACC championship in the next four years.”While SU (2-4, 0-2 Atlantic Coast) ultimately fell flat in its 38-20 defeat at the hands of the then-No. 1 Seminoles (6-0, 4-0) on Saturday afternoon in the Carrier Dome, glimpses of the Orange’s future illuminated the loss. Long connected with wide receiver Steve Ishmael — a fellow true freshman — for a pair of touchdowns, and freshman running back Ervin Philips flashed his potential for the first time since SU beat Central Michigan on Sept. 13.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor an offense that hadn’t scored a touchdown in over 100 minutes of play, the contributions of its youth were badly needed.Long took the majority of the snaps at quarterback in his SU debut and, despite his two interceptions, showed good command of the offense, accuracy with his throws and an ability to pick up yards with his feet.He finished 16-for-27 for 167 passing yards and two touchdowns, plus 20 yards on the ground in three attempts.“AJ was just the way I thought he would be,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said. “Did he make mistakes? Yes. But all in all, the opportunity to be baptized by fire against No. 1 in the country, I thought the kid did a pretty darn good job.”On the other end of Long’s throws was Ishmael, who finished with three catches for 93 yards and his first two collegiate touchdowns.The rapport began as Long threw a pass on the run in the second quarter. Ishmael went up and got it, and held on as he fell to the turf for an acrobatic 36-yard gain that moved the Orange to FSU’s 7-yard line.Long led Ishmael perfectly with a 22-yard strike on a go route that the receiver hauled in in the end zone, SU’s first offensive touchdown since Sept. 27.Ishmael then did the majority of the work on the pair’s next touchdown, taking a pass from Long over the middle at the 17-yard line. He ran diagonally toward the end zone, split a group of five FSU defenders and made a diving attempt to cross the goal line for a 35-yard score.“It was an amazing connection,” Ishmael said with a smile. “We’re just going to continue learning from here on out, planning on just getting some more extra work. So we’re just going to keep on doing that.”Philips impressed for the first time since his 55-yard performance against Central Michigan. Against FSU, the running back took a jet sweep from Long after going in motion from the slot and ran along the far sideline for a 16-yard pickup.In light of recruiting specialist George McDonald’s recent demotion from offensive coordinator to solely wide receivers coach, question marks now accompany the next few years for the Orange.But on Saturday, Long, Ishmael and Philips offered potential answers.Said left tackle Sean Hickey: “I’ll be excited to see what’s going on in three or four years.” Comments Published on October 13, 2014 at 12:31 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbbcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Violas reflects on late grandfather, Syracuse career as senior season approaches end

first_imgMelina Violas has a picture of herself at a young age in an orange wig next to her grandfather, Peter Violas. The two are posing at the bottom of the pullout bleachers at a Syracuse basketball game in the Carrier Dome. Violas, her father, uncle and grandfather all sat 20 rows up in the bleachers for the game.Although she grew up in Los Angeles, her family’s roots are in Canandaigua, New York, just an hour west of Syracuse. A Buffalo Bills or Syracuse shirt was always in her closet.And her grandfather — who passed away on July 2, 2008 — was mostly the reason why.The Violas’ connection to central New York made coming to SU easier, even though Melina passed on offers to play elsewhere and had to make the Orange volleyball team as a walk-on. Violas earned a scholarship as a senior this season and, despite losing her libero spot to freshman Belle Sand amid Syracuse’s (8-18, 1-13 Atlantic Coast) season-long struggles, she reflects positively on her career at and her grandfather’s hand in it.“I feel close to him every time I put on my Syracuse jersey, or every single time I get to go and have Thanksgiving with my family or to spend holidays with my family that I never got the opportunity to do,” Melina said. “Even though he’s not there, I know he’s still a part of it all.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn July 2, 2008, Melina and her Santa Monica Beach club volleyball teammates were back at the hotel after finishing the third day of a four-day tournament. Melina’s parents, Guy and Shari Violas, went to the hotel’s pool to order Coronas.Guy’s phone rang. It was his father’s phone number but his brother on the other end. He told him their father had a heart attack while he was at the Greater Rochester International Airport baggage claim and he might be dying. Guy went numb, ran to his hotel room with his wife and when the phone rang again, he learned Peter had died.With puffy red eyes, Guy tried telling his daughter the news. But he couldn’t muster any words and when a teammate’s mother did so, a 14-year-old Violas dropped her head in her father’s shoulder.Within an hour, the family started the 10-hour drive from Reno to Los Angeles, where they flew cross-country to Rochester, New York.At Peter’s funeral, the poem “Footprints in the Sand” by Mary Stevenson and footprints were printed on cards. To honor him, Melina had the footprints from the cards tattooed on her ribs.“I felt like when he passed away, I didn’t really get the chance to become as close to him as I wanted to because he lived across the country,” Melina said.Guy described his father as “the biggest Syracuse fan on the planet.” A native of Canandaigua, Peter’s fandom came from his proximity to SU and from guarding Jim Boeheim when the legendary basketball coach was playing for Lyons High School. For years, Peter kept stats for each basketball game he watched.Peter’s sons wanted to go to SU, but couldn’t afford to. So Guy ingrained SU and sports into Melina from an early age. When she had to make her decision between Colgate, Cornell and Syracuse, it was an easy one.Midway through Melina’s freshman season, Syracuse fired head coach Jing Pu and hired current head coach Leonid Yelin before her sophomore season. Despite the coaching switch, she stuck with the program.“As a walk-on, I never felt she was doing less and asking for something easy because she’s (a) walk-on because she’s not on scholarship,” Yelin said. “She’s a hard-working kid, she did everything like everyone else.”Nine of Melina’s fellow freshmen joined the program in 2011, but only four reached their sophomore years at SU and only two reached their junior years.Despite starting 18 games last year, Melina didn’t get a scholarship until this season, which has been a difficult one for her. She’s made 44 reception errors in 26 games, five more than 39 in 30 games last year.Kathryn Metherell, Guy’s mother, has never missed a home match and would bring pom-poms to cheer on her granddaughter, then soothe Melina by taking her out to dinner after.The volleyball team used to throw mini-volleyballs to the crowd at home games and Melina would always throw the ball to her grandmother — and each one is still in the trunk of Metherell’s car.And despite SU’s and her personal struggles, she decides to look at her positive accomplishments with the program. Volleyball has not only brought her closer to her grandmother, but her grandfather too.“I know that my grandfather is always with me,” Melina said, “and I know that he is always supporting me in everything I do and he’s always looking down on me.” Comments Published on November 18, 2014 at 12:20 am Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more