STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Deeanna Mallett Named To Deans List At Keene State

first_imgKEENE, NH — Keene State College has announced that the following Wilmington student has been named to the Fall 2018 Dean’s List:Deeanna MallettAbout Keene State CollegeKeene State College is a preeminent public liberal arts college that ensures student access to world-class academic programs. Integrating academics with real-world application and active community and civic engagement, Keene State College prepares graduates to meet society’s challenges by thinking critically, acting creatively, and serving the greater good. To learn more about Keene State College, visit http://www.keene.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Keene State College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Keene State CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Pumphret & Rae Named To Dean’s List At Keene StateIn “Education”Wilmington’s Mallett, Mazzie & Rae Named To Dean’s List At Keene StateIn “Education”last_img read more

EU gives Britain 6month delay for Brexit

first_imgBritish prime minister Theresa May holds a news conference following an extraordinary European Union leaders summit to discuss Brexit, in Brussels, Belgium on 11 April 2019. Photo: AFPEuropean leaders agreed with Britain on Thursday to delay Brexit by up to six months, saving the continent from what could have been a chaotic no-deal departure at the end of the week.The deal struck during late night talks in Brussels means that if London remains in the EU after 22 May, British voters will have to take part in European elections.Prime minister Theresa May and the other 27 EU leaders “have agreed a flexible extension until 31 October”, European Council president Donald Tusk said in a tweet.”This means additional six months for the UK to find the best possible solution.”France’s President Emmanuel Macron was the strongest voice opposing a long extension, but most leaders backed it and the French had to settle for a promise that the delay will be reviewed at an EU summit on 21 June.Most of the leaders gathered for the emergency summit, including German chancellor Angela Merkel, had backed a plan for Brexit to be postponed for up to a year.But as the talks went into Thursday morning, Macron — with backing from Belgium, Austria and some smaller EU states — held out for a short delay of only a few weeks and demanded solid guarantees that London would not interfere in EU business during that time.May has already said that if Britain is still an EU member when the European parliamentary election begins on 23 May, UK voters will take part. But some EU leaders are unconvinced that she is sincere, despite one official telling reporters her presentation had been “solid”.Without a postponement, Britain would have ended its 46-year membership of the EU at midnight (2200 GMT) on Friday with no deal, risking economic chaos on both sides of the Channel.May agreed a divorce deal with the EU last November but MPs in London have rejected it three times, forcing her to turn to the main opposition Labour party in a bid to find a way through.’As soon as possible’ But these talks are moving slowly, and the prime minister is under intense pressure from hardline Brexit supporters in her Conservative party not to compromise.As she arrived, May said she wanted to leave the EU “as soon as possible”.”I’ve asked for an extension to 30 June but what is important is that any extension enables us to leave at the point at which we ratify the withdrawal agreement,” she said.She said she still hoped to leave the EU on 22 May, the last day before Britain must hold European Parliament elections.For as long as Britain is in the EU, it must take part in bloc elections for them to be valid.EU leaders have already agreed one delay to Brexit, from 29 March to 12 April, and Tusk has warned there is “little reason to believe” the British parliament can ratify May’s deal by 30 June.A draft copy of the summit conclusions seen by AFP before the leaders sat down to finalise it said “an extension should last only as long as necessary and, in any event, no longer than [XX.XX.XXXX].””If the withdrawal agreement is ratified by both parties before this date, the withdrawal will take place on the first day of the following month,” the draft stated.EU members want to ensure that a semi-detached Britain does not seek leverage in Brexit talks by intervening in choosing the next head of the European Commission or the next multi-year EU budget.May’s ministers have begun cross-party talks with Labour on a compromise to get the withdrawal agreement through the House of Commons.Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wants Britain to commit to remaining within the EU customs union, an idea that many in Europe would be keen to accommodate.”We would be generous in negotiating that, understanding that the UK couldn’t be a silent partner in such an arrangement — it would have to have a say in decisions being made,” Irish premier Leo Varadkar said as he arrived at the summit.last_img read more

Bengal Chamber collaborates with IAICC to promote SMEs

first_imgKolkata: A MoU was signed between the Bengal Chamber and the Indian American International Chamber of Commerce (IAICC) to provide business advisory services to small and medium enterprises of India and USA.The collaboration aims to facilitate B2B links between American businesses and their Indian counterparts of East and north-east. Subhodip Ghosh, director general, the Bengal Chamber, Ambarish Dasgupta, founder and senior partner, Intueri Consulting LLP, A Mukherjee, senior vice-president, The Bengal Chamber, Patricia Hoffman, Consul General of The United States of America in Kolkata, K V Kumar, chairman and CEO of IAICC and other delegates were present during the MoU signing. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”The Bengal Chamber has always been at the forefront to provide platforms for business links irrespective of geographical boundaries and Kumar has served in Trump campaign’s Asian American and Pacific Islander Advisory Council. Being an authority on government relations, alliance building, crisis management and his long association with the World Bank, his visit would be integral for forging business developments between America and India. We have signed an MoU with IAICC to create a joint council to offer services to stake holders in form of B2B links and advisory services for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Whenever, a delegation would come from the US, Kolkata would be a stopover,” said Subhodip Ghosh, director general, The Bengal Chamber. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateKV Kumar said: “The IAICC is seeking to open offices in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Manila, Dubai, Hong Kong and 30 chapters in the US itself. We are looking forward to creative and innovative ways of doing business. There are about 600,000 Indian-American businesses in the US. West Bengal being strategically placed is ideal to act as a gateway to accessing markets in the ASEAN countries. At present, we are working in four states in India where each state has made a Chamber of Commerce a platform to create business links. We are putting up an innovative challenge — a new platform for doing business, which is part virtual and part real, where businesses are initiated through virtual media between traders, buyers, sellers establishing B2B links that later involves personal meet ups and visits to check products or services. We are going to invite Amit Mitra, West Bengal state minister of Finance and IT, and Electronics, Industry, Commerce, Enterprise and E-governance and MSME to USA on August 30 to attend a business forum where the innovative ideas would be introduced.” The IAICC works with entrepreneurs, professionals, businesses and governments to develop entrepreneurship and commerce through mentor-protégé programmes, training, seminars and networking opportunities.last_img read more

Online Lifestyle Retailers Are Turning Into Magazines

first_imgBut producing editorial content that rivals the output of top magazines — the standard to which Gilt aspires — is no easy feat. “People forget that to do this well you need to have the right team and you need to carve out the right ecosystem within a business that isn’t necessarily set up to do editorial,” says Thoreson. “If you just treat it as some sort of commodity, you’re likely not going to succeed here.”But with U.S. online retail sales expected to grow to $262 billion this year from $231 billion in 2012, it’s worth doing what it takes to claim a bigger slice of the ecommerce pie. And already this kind of content is becoming expected for companies who want to stand out. Over the past three years, he says, a commitment to quality editorial “has gone from something that’s a novelty [for ecommerce brands] to something that’s an essential.”But however important content marketing is for online retailers now, it is as merchants, not publishers, that Bureau of Trade and other new-wave companies will ultimately succeed or fail. The women behind Zady understand this. “At the end of the day, Zady is a wonderful and beautiful ecommerce site,” Darabi says.Related: Struggling With Online Sales? So Are the Big Guys Models present clothing from Frank & Oak’s Fall/Winter 2014 collection during New York Fashion Week on September 8, 2013.Image credit: Brian Patrick Eha Lend us your earsFor brands that want to be more than mere online shops, maintaining a consistent editorial voice is paramount. The arch, worldly tone of the Bureau’s editorial — “more John Cleese than Gawker” — is “the reason we were able to raise any money at all,” Moskowitz says. (The Bureau raised $1.2 million in seed money in September 2012 from Foundation Capital and others.) “They want this voice. That’s what people had a visceral reaction to.”As for how he arrived at the proper tone for the Bureau’s emails and other editorial, says Moskowitz, “I wanted a buttoned-up sense of Fifties formality, because that’s what helps jokes land.” Case in point: a racy video, made in partnership with Esquire for the Bureau’s Japan Rising collection, which explains shibori, the ancient Japanese art of dying fabric. In the video, a dominatrix stuffs a shibori cotton pocket square into a client’s mouth to silence him. It’s an image not soon forgotten.Zady founders Maxine Bédat, 31, and Soraya Darabi, 30, say their editorial voice aims to be “an authentic voice for our generation.” Zady launched with an eye toward rescuing people from the soullessness of fast fashion, and its founders’ own sense of the zeitgeist is what determines the editorial content. The retailer produces two types of stories: brand stories, which Bédat says are fundamental to the company’s mission, and standalone features. The former are based on interviews that Bédat and Darabi conduct with every brand they sell, dissecting what makes them special. The latter have no direct connection to the products Zady sells. Whether they realized it or not, guests were holding in their hands the vanguard of a growing trend among ecommerce brands: the convergence of online retail and editorial content. Increasingly, digital retailers are finding value in weaving story elements around their products as a way of compensating for the lack of the sensory experience one finds in brick-and-mortar stores. And some are going even further, commissioning words and images with no obvious sales component.Fashion marketplaces Net-a-Porter and Gilt Groupe pioneered the trend, and over the past three years it has snowballed. A new wave of ecommerce startups is now getting traction in the marketplace by marrying high-quality editorial with online shops boasting fast delivery, excellent customer service and lust-worthy products.Related: In New Venture, Bonobos Co-Founder Reimagines the Way Men ShopIt’s a strategy that is paying off for Frank & Oak, which received $5 million last October from Lightbank and other investors. Some of that money was put toward editorial efforts. Right now, three of the company’s 100 employees focus entirely on researching and creating stories. While that may seem like a small fraction, it is a sign that the company is serious about educating and entertaining its customers.”Especially for guys, contextualizing clothing makes a lot of sense,” says Ethan Song, 29, Frank & Oak’s co-founder and creative director. “Clothing is not just clothing.”Narrative merchandiseMichael Phillips Moskowitz, founder of one-year-old startup Bureau of Trade, wants nothing to do with unmemorable junk. The Bureau, as it’s called, curates “narrative merchandise” — unique clothing and lifestyle items, even classic cars and taxidermied scorpions — for discerning men and makes the goods available for purchase online. “Precious pieces,” the 35-year-old Moskowitz calls them.His New York City-based team of five is supplemented by eight part-time curators in cities around the world, from Los Angeles to Tel Aviv, all of whom are tasked with finding stylish clothes, interesting books, vintage watches, antique furniture and other desirables for the Bureau. Some are found on eBay and Craigslist; others are sourced from trusted boutiques. Moskowitz himself spends time overseas once a quarter, hunting in shops, bazaars and souks. When he finds a merchant with an item he wants for the Bureau, he talks him into putting it online. The Bureau gets a cut of every purchase made through its website.The goods are grouped by theme, often something au courant, though Moskowitz has also organized larger collections. Continental Rift, for instance, focused on Africa, with droll teaser videos released in the days before its launch. Either way, each item is tied to a larger story. “Storytelling and commerce are inseparable,” Moskowitz says. “Otherwise it’s just stuff.” Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Zady co-founders Maxine Bedat and Soraya Darabi want to put an end to soulless fast fashion with their venture-backed startup.Image credit: Zady September 13, 2013 On a warm Sunday in September, stylish men and women lined up on a street in New York City’s Meatpacking District to see a preview of the fall/winter collection of Frank & Oak, an ecommerce startup for menswear. It was the brand’s first presentation during New York Fashion Week, so it was something of a coming-out party.Inside, the bare industrial space evoked the workshop of famed inventor Nikola Tesla, complete with work table, assorted tools and a faux electricity machine. On plywood platforms, 12 models stood facing the crowd, dressed to ward off the winter chill. There was a green tweed suit, a double-breasted glen plaid blazer, a chunky white cable-knit sweater and, of course, the obligatory scarf or two.The crowd passed through in shifts. As they left the workshop, guests were each handed something unusual: a copy of the inaugural issue of Frank & Oak’s own quarterly magazine, The Edit. Printed on heavyweight environmental paper, issue No. 1 is 26 pages long, features actor and designer Waris Alhuwalia on its cover and is full of words and visuals designed to appeal to Frank & Oak’s customers. Along with a profile of Alhuwalia, there is a piece about Montreal-based furniture company À Hauteur d’Homme, which has designed a men’s valet for Frank & Oak, and a photo feature on what to pack for a fall trip to Portland. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img 10 min read One feature is an interview with a New York Times photo editor who produced a Kickstarter-funded documentary about horse-rearing customs in Iceland. It seems a strange thing to find on a fashion retailer’s website. “We think that the kind of customer who likes a story about denim made in North Carolina will also like a story about a beautiful documentary about wild horses in Iceland,” Bédat says. She admits it’s a hunch. “Time will tell us if that’s true or not.” For now, they can afford to experiment; Zady received $1.35 million in October 2012 from New Enterprise Associates and others.Where Frank & Oak is building a dedicated editorial team, Zady is using serious freelance journalists to create its content. A feature on work-life integration — as opposed to the impossible ideal of work-life balance — carries the byline of Melissa Wall, the founding editor of Newsweek’s iPad edition. “We’re trying to define where we are culturally,” Bédat says of the feature’s subject matter. “So far, our intuition seems to be on point.”A shopping community”You’re essentially trying to build a community of like-minded individuals around your brand,” Thoreson says of such efforts. Admittedly, the ROI picture is “murkier” with content that isn’t tied to products, but such editorial is “no less powerful” as a branding tool, he says.Since Frank & Oak’s founding in February 2012, 800,000 people have signed up for its members-only site, with the majority of customers living in the U.S., Song says. And many who have downloaded the Frank & Oak mobile app access the app every day. As Song sees it, that represents a major shift in how brands are built and how consumers interact with products. “You’d never walk into a store every day,” he points out.Fashion and style magazines, as Moskowitz is quick to note, have always excelled at narrative — and at the related art of cultivating desire. To hear him tell it, online retailers now have the chance to be like magazines, only better, because they can indulge the impulse to buy. “GQ isn’t shoppable,” he says. “Esquire isn’t shoppable.” Ethan Song, co-founder and creative director of Frank & Oak, collaborating with Ricardo Hinojosa, a Mexican artisan who has made wallets and cardholders for Frank & Oak. Hinojosa’s business partner, Jose Antonio Echeverria, looks on.Image credit: Samuel Pasquier Lend us your ears It isn’t surprising that a retailer who aspires to be “the merchandise equivalent of the Library of Alexandria” cares about the provenance of his wares. But he goes further, saying that as local and regional ties have loosened their hold over the past century, and racial and ethnic differences have become less contentious, our identities have come to be defined primarily by what we buy, where we eat, how we shop and other markers of cultural consumption.It’s an idea that has been voiced by Tyler Brûlé, founder of media brand Monocle, which serves the global cosmopolitan elite, and others: In today’s world, possessions evidence character. In its extreme formulation, it’s the idea that, at least in the eyes of others, we are what we surround ourselves with. By marrying shopping with storytelling, brands such as Bureau of Trade and Zady, a New York City-based fashion retailer that launched this month, charge what might otherwise be mere acquisitiveness with the primal human need for meaning.”Online shopping is increasingly about exploration,” says Tyler Thoreson, vice president of men’s editorial, creative and customer experience for Gilt. “It’s less transactional.”It’s a mistake to look for an immediate return on your investment in editorial, he says. Brand visibility, goodwill, excitement, customer loyalty — these are the things it achieves. “You have to ask yourself what your goals are. Is it [sales] conversion, or is it marketing and branding?”Related: The Family Behind Luxury Lingerie Business Cosabella Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more

How Event Management and Analytics Gave This EVite Company a Boost

first_img Register Now » When global streaming music juggernaut Spotify hosts an event–which it does a couple of hundred times per year–it relies on Splash to get the invites out. Part online invitation platform, part ticketing service and part event showcase, Splash is “the greatest event-management platform ever,” according to Ben Hindman, the company’s co-founder.Hyperbole aside, Hindman says New York City-based Splash is the first platform that allows users to manage the entire life cycle of an event, from sending out invitations and selling tickets (if necessary) to hosting post-party photos and video.While anyone can use Splash to create a party or sell tickets to a show, Hindman says the service is ideal for branded events looking for a unique, high-quality presentation, rather than a generic template to fill in.”Basically, I built this product for people like me,” he says.In his former job, as director of events for lifestyle site Thrillist, Hindman was in charge of throwing can’t-miss events around the country. He envisioned an online tool that could help him manage parties from start to finish–one that would make the invitations irresistible and help him keep the shindigs memorable long after the lights were turned off. In 2010 he partnered with developers Brett Boskoff and Chris Clement to build out the platform; they launched the company a year later.Clients design their invitations on the Splash site, choosing imagery, fonts and color schemes and deciding on the placement of elements such as buttons for RSVPs and ticket sales. During the event, the site streams photos and video, then keeps them online for posterity.For individuals, bare-bones invites are free, but corporate clients readily pony up a couple thousand dollars per month for unlimited access to more invitation features, design and marketing assistance, analytics and 24/7 support. If a company charges attendees, Splash takes 2 percent of ticket sales plus $1 per ticket sold to process the transactions.Hindman points to Spotify as an ideal client. “They’re doing all these events, but they need to keep a consistent voice and brand, and they also need to collect all this information on the attendees to determine the success of these events. We help them micromanage everything, from setting up the ‘save the date’ e-mails to creating a photo gallery and even pulling together a Spotify playlist.”Hindman says revenue has tripled every year since launch. Last year, Splash’s 12-person team helped manage 80,000 events that drew a total of 1.6 million attendees and sold $3.5 million in tickets. Clients include Facebook, NPR and the NBA; one big-name beer company is using the service to manage 50,000 events this year alone. No surprise that all that helped Splash blow past its 2014 goal by March.Power ServeAn external iPhone battery case doubles as a sleek mini-serverSmartphone accessories rarely save the day, but the mophie space pack can. This rechargeable battery case can revive a spent iPhone 5 or 5s at the flick of a switch and, at the tap of its accompanying and intuitive Space app, boost the phone’s memory, adding up to 32 GB–enough to store an extra 16,000 photos, 14 hours of video or 9,000 songs. An engineering marvel, the case ($150 for 16 GB; $180 for 32 GB) amps up power and storage but adds very little heft. –J.P.P. This story appears in the July 2014 issue of . Subscribe » July 27, 2014 3 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalslast_img read more

How to Push Your Company to Digital Maturity

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global What happens after digital transformation? If you play your cards right, you achieve digital maturity. And that’s an achievement worth pushing for: According to research from Deloitte, half of digitally mature organizations report higher net profit margins and increased revenue compared to the industry average. Clearly, there are advantages to nailing a tech-first approach.Digital transformation involves a series of steps that build on one another, as tech is adopted and implemented with the end goal of creating a digitally mature organization. The first step is to analyze whatever incidental assets might already be supporting digital transformation — using shared data or integrated communication platforms, for example.After that comes an intentional effort to make processes digital, cloud-based and more streamlined. Companies start developing strategies, making plans, identifying technologies and reconfiguring budgets to make this a central objective. The broad benefits of digital transformation have yet to be felt at this point, but the underlying infrastructure is being built.Related: Ten Key Pitfalls To Avoid During The Digital Transformation ProcessOnce the constituent parts are up and running, the priority becomes integrating workflows and technologies as seamlessly as possible. This step can be resource-intensive and prone to setbacks, which is why companies need to take a systematic approach with careful oversight. At this point, the benefits of digital transformation start to become more apparent, which increases institutional buy-in.The final step is to optimize all digital-led processes, after which companies can consider themselves digitally mature. This distinction implies that an organization leverages technology at all levels to become flexible, efficient, innovative and highly competitive.Making progress along the transformation journey takes the right strategy and resources; otherwise, digital maturity will always be unattainable. There’s a process to push your company past digital infancy and on to maturity.Cultivate digital leaders.Digital transformation doesn’t happen naturally. The project will stall without effort, engagement and, most importantly, leadership. Digital leaders are the ones who push companies to embrace tech first in pursuit of smart solutions and new advantages.Jeremy Larner, president of JKL Worldwide, is a great example of what a digital leader looks like. His company operates an art investment platform for the sharing economy that uses its online orientation to engage investors across the globe. Compared to the rest of the art world, Larner’s approach is exciting and accessible, mostly thanks to its innovative use of technology.Companies can cultivate their own digital leaders by valuing leadership skills like inclusion, growth and collaboration. They can also promote younger employees sooner, even having them serve as “digital mentors” to senior staff. Risk-taking and experimentation are important to identify in digital leaders, too, as those strengths mark the people best suited for a disruptive, tech-driven future.Related: The Changing Face Of Digital TransformationUpgrade the employee experience.Having employees who know, use and can learn to love technology is essential for digital maturity. And the feeling should be mutual: Companies that are behind the times technologically will have trouble holding on to tech-savvy employees. Qualified workers have their choice of employers right now, and they consistently choose companies that embrace technology and leverage it organically. In practice, that means organizations that use technology to make work more efficient, productive and engaging.Instead of always leading with a customer-first mentality, digital transformation needs to focus on the employee experience as well. As Scott Schoeneberger, managing partner at design-forward technology company Bluewater, observes, “The new currency for office technology is no longer just functionality — it’s experience.”If that experience is anything less than optimal, employees will be less than enthusiastic about digital transformation. In contrast, consider a remote meeting involving a digital whiteboard that all parties can use simultaneously — that could engage a worker in even the most mundane of business activities.Promote a digital culture.A digital culture can, and actually should, precede digital transformation. A 2019 survey by Usabilla found that 41 percent of respondents believe their current culture is an obstacle to digital transformation. In digital cultures, employees are eager to replace legacy systems with new technologies, open to the idea of uncertainty and experimentation and committed to engineering improvement and innovation into all things.Even something as intangible as optimism is important. According to a survey from digital business consultancy Janeiro Digital, almost 85 percent of logistics industry workers believe their company lags behind in terms of digital maturity. Nearly a quarter of respondents attribute that to a lack of enthusiasm and support for change. And digital transformation is just that — a change from the status quo to something radically improved. If it’s going to be successful, team members must be excited about the new and clear-eyed about the defects of the old.Related: 4 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Embrace the Next Phase of Digital Maturity, ‘Cognitive Transformation’Digital maturity is a marked achievement, but it’s never the endpoint. As more companies reach this status, all organizations will need to continue to grow and innovate in order to stand out. Adaptation will be an ongoing obligation, so now is a great time to start mastering it. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. April 25, 2019 5 min read Register Now »last_img read more