North Caicos man jailed for incest violates own daughter

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppGrand Turk, TCI, January 16, 2017 – The Prosecutor’s Office and Police have secured a conviction for a 53 year old man who has confessed to the most sickening of crimes; incest and buggery of his own 8-year old daughter.John Lightbourne of North Caicos this morning confessed to sexually assaulting his primary school aged child in July 2016.   The 53 year old, who is a fisherman and carpenter, lives in North, the child is a resident of Provo and while he could have gotten life for the crime, he was sentenced to a mere eight years and is now jailed at Her Majesty’s prison in Grand Turk.The two charges – incest and buggery – will run concurrently.  The sentencing was handed down by Robert Schuster, Supreme Court judge.#MagneticNewsMedia#JohnLightbourne Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp TCI Premier blasts Opposition side for “slop” information, sets it straight in HOA Nearly 30 Haitians caught following illegal landing in Nassau, says Defence Force Recommended for you Related Items:#JohnLightbourne, #MagneticNewsMedia Bahamas Police Commissioner Greenslade gone to UK, appointed as High Commissionerlast_img read more

Digital Circulation Continues Slow Creep Upward

first_img The former actually reported a year-over-year decline in digital circulation through the first six months of 2015, down to 11.3 million issues, though that’s a little misleading since the total number of titles in the study shrunk as well.* Looking only at magazines audited in both years, digital circulation grew 2.6 percent. Overall growth was at 13 percent in the same period last year, and nearly doubled between 2012 and 2013. Digital circulation was more common among BPA’s titles. The firm doesn’t release exact circulation figures, but says digital issues accounted for 25.7 percent of all qualified circulation through the end of last year, up from 24 percent in the previous period. It also says nearly 44 percent of its 550-plus brands reported at least some digital readership. Publishers haven’t given up hope on digital editions yet, but the industry might run out of patience soon. Numbers were up, but losses weren’t uncommon. Even Game Informer, which, with 2.7 million digital readers accounts for almost a quarter of the total market, saw a 3.4 percent decline in circulation. And much digital growth came at the expense of print readership as publishers cut costs. Digital edition circulation was up again, according to statements from both major audit houses, the Alliance for Audited Media and BPA Worldwide, though just barely this time.center_img *Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that AAM measured digital circulation at 11.4 million issues. In comparing numbers here, it’s worth nothing that BPA’s client roster is made up of a mix of B2B and consumer magazines, while AAM serves consumer titles almost exclusively. Additionally, the timeframes of the respective studies don’t line up—BPA’s report looks at July 1 – Dec. 31, 2014; AAM’s examines Jan. 1 – June 30, 2015. Other major magazines did see legitimate digital gains however. Allrecipes (115 percent), New York (111 percent), Family Circle (89 percent), Better Homes and Gardens (86 percent) and National Geographic Traveler (85 percent) were all winners to start the year.last_img read more

Congress isnt voting on any selfdriving car rules before 2019 report says

first_img 26 Photos Comments 71 Photos Honda PilotDropping down to seventh place for 2019 is the Honda Pilot. Like its two-row Passport sibling, the three-row Pilot offers parent-focused technology like Cabin Talk as well as myriad standard driver-assistance features through the Honda Sensing tech suite. Honda’s largest crossover offers up nearly 84 cubic feet of cargo space. Honda’s 3.5-liter V6 engine shows up again, making a serviceable 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. Touring and Elite trims get a nine-speed automatic transmission while lower trims have to make do with a six-speed auto. The Honda Pilot is made in Lincoln, Alabama. 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2019 Jeep Cherokee can handle the rough stuff 52 Photos Chevrolet ColoradoMaking its debut in the top 10 is the Chevrolet Colorado. Shown here in the tough ZR2 Bison off-road spec, the Chevy Colorado is an excellent truck and one of the two midsize pickups you can get with a diesel engine. Adding to the ZR2’s two-inch lift and front and rear locking differentials, the Bison gets beefier skid plates (trust me, that’s a good thing), steel bumpers and integrated recovery points. Heck, you can even get a snorkel.Base models get a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine with a six-speed manual transmission, but a more popular choice is the 3.6-liter V6 gas engine with 308 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque, mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Meanwhile, the 2.8-liter diesel pumps out 186 horsepower and a delicious 369 pound-feet of twist and is mated to a six-speed automatic. The Chevy Colorado is built in Wentzville, Missouri. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport loves to hustle 49 Photos 2019 GMC Sierra Denali review: So close to greatness Acura RDXThe third-generation Acura RDX squeaks into the top ten list with larger proportions, plenty of interior space and better handling than its predecessor. Forward collision warning with collision mitigation braking, adaptive cruise control that works even in low-speed traffic, lane-keeping steering assist and road departure mitigation are all standard across the board. Like its MDX counterpart, the RDX is available with the A-Spec styling package.The RDX sports a 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine. Output is stated at 273 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, and it’s mated to a 10-speed automatic transmission. The new RDX is built in East Liberty, Ohio. 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Share your voice 2019 Acura RDX A-Spec: Sharp handling, sharper looks 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Tags Honda OdysseyThe feature-rich Honda Odyssey minivan also retains its number-two slot from last year’s list. While the 2019 model doesn’t see any changes from last, it’s still a darn good choice for families on the go with reconfigurable seats, Wi-Fi and an excellent rear-seat entertainment system. The Cabin Watch video system lets parents keep an eye on their little darlings without turning around in their seats, while Cabin Talk amplifies their voice so no yelling is required.The Odyssey is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 rated for 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. Most trims get a nine-speed automatic but the top Touring and Elite trims now use a 10-speed automatic with stop-start technology. The Honda Odyssey is made in Lincoln, Alabama. Jeep CherokeeKeeping its top-of-the-list placement, the Jeep Cherokee is 2019’s most American-made car. Refreshed for 2019, the compact crossover now features more tech, better cargo space and a slightly tweaked look. It’s available in no fewer the nine trims, including the off-road specific Trailhawk and a fancy-pants Trailhawk Elite.For 2019, the Cherokee gets a new 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine with 270 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque, though naturally aspirated I4 and V6 choices are also available. Regardless of engine, a nine-speed automatic transmission gets the power to the pavement — or dirt as the case may be. The Cherokee is made in Belvidere, Illinois. Car Industry Car Industry Auto Tech More From Roadshow 0 Honda PassportThe Honda Passport is a new (well, reborn) entry to both the Honda lineup and the American Made Index. This midsize crossover comes to the fray with great driving dynamics and plenty of tech like the standard Honda Sensing suite of active safety features. An available 8-inch touchscreen gets Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as well as a Wi-Fi hotspot.Under the hood is the stalwart 3.5-liter V6 producing 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. However unlike the Ridgeline, the Passport sends that power through a nine-speed automatic transmission. Having said that, just like the Ridgeline, this is the only powertrain available. The Honda Passport is built in Lincoln, Alabama. Waymo General Motors Tesla Self-driving cars,Enlarge ImageIt’s all in a day’s work for the Jeep Cherokee, the most American-made car in 2019. Jeep With high trade tensions looming and increasing talk of tariffs, more and more consumers are looking to buy American. Cars.com has released its annual American Made Index, showcasing companies that use the most American-sourced parts and labor in their vehicles. The results may surprise you.Cars.com analyzed more than 100 US-built vehicles for five key data points: manufacturing location, parts sourcing, US employment, engine sourcing and transmission sourcing. You might think something like the Ford F-150 would top the list, but it drops from its No. 5 spot for 2018 and out of the top 10 completely. Even the first-place holder, the Jeep Cherokee, is a pretty global product. It’s a Jeep, sure, but that brand is part of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, an Italian-owned business.Cars.com surveyed 1,000 people and found that half are concerned about automotive import tariffs, with 41% saying they are unsure if tariffs would make them more likely to buy American. Either way, we’re big fans of all the vehicles on this list. These days, buying American doesn’t necessarily mean sticking with a US-based automaker. 2019 Honda Passport: A well-rounded midsize offering Enlarge ImageCompanies like Waymo and Uber will just have to wait and hope to get less stringent rules for testing on the books, according to Congress. Roadshow Back in October, we reported on the Department of Transportation’s plan to ease regulations for self-driving cars. Since the DOT released its policy initiative, things have been relatively quiet, but according to a report published Thursday by Reuters, we can be confident that nothing will happen with Congress on that front until 2019.Oh, and Congress won’t be addressing a proposal from GM and Tesla that seeks to extend the $7,500 federal EV tax credit either. The self-driving car legislation and the tax credit proposals needed to be attached to another bill funding government operations, but they weren’t, so no dice.Now that Tesla has surpassed the 200,000 vehicle mark, the federal EV tax credit for Tesla will be cut in half on Jan. 1 to $3,750. It will be phased out entirely by the end of the year unless Congress decides to do something about it in 2019, though whether that’s likely is not clear.Automakers and autonomous car developers are now left with the choice between waiting it out and hoping Congress acts in their favor. Or they can appeal to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in hopes that it will relax its rules, which it has said in the past that it is considering doing. 2019 Honda Ridgeline: The commuter’s pickup truckcenter_img Chevrolet CorvetteMoving up from the 10th-place slot last year is the 2019 Chevrolet Corvette. While we’ve all been ogling the new mid-engine Corvette, it’s easy to forget what a performance bargain the current-generation ‘Vette is. From the base trim to the Grand Sport to the bonkers ZR1, the Corvette is an American icon.My preference is for the Grand Sport, which strikes a perfect balance between everyday drivability and canyon-carving performance. The 6.2-liter V8 puts out 460 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque. You can get it with a seven-speed manual or eight-speed automatic transmission, but the kicker is the borrowed chassis and aero parts from the beefier Z06. Like I said, perfect balance. The Corvette is made in Bowling Green, Kentucky. 2019 Acura MDX adds new features and an A-Spec model 2019 Honda Ridgeline review: Light duty, heavy punch More From Roadshow Share your voice 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Bison: A tougher off-roader Acura MDXMoving up one slot to sixth place on the American Made Index is the non-hybrid variant of the Acura MDX. With its SH-AWD system, the MDX is one of the better handling midsize luxury crossovers, and for 2019 the company gives us the A-Spec treatment with a new front fascia and side skirts, 20-inch wheels, wider exhaust tips, unique gauges, a new steering wheel, carbon fiber trim and various Alcantara interior touches.However, both the standard and A-Spec models get a 3.5-liter V6 engine, rated for 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque going through a nine-speed automatic transmission. The Acura MDX is made in East Liberty, Ohio.  GMC CanyonIf you’re looking for a slightly fancier version of the Colorado that’s more focused on luxe than dirt, check out the GMC Canyon. The top Denali trim gets standard heated and ventilated front seats as well as a heated steering wheel. Maximum payload capability is 1,665 pounds while max towing is a fairly healthy 7,600 pounds.The Canyon is available with the same 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, 3.6-liter V6 or 2.8-liter diesel as the Chevrolet Colorado. It’s also built in Wentzville, Missouri. 69 Photos 2019 Honda Odyssey offers plenty of room and features for families 2019 GMC Canyon: A fancier Colorado Self-driving cars 68 Photos Tags Post a comment 12 Photos General Motors Chevrolet Honda Jeep Acura 10 Photos Honda RidgelineAgain keeping the status quo, the Honda Ridgeline maintains third place on the American Made Index. This crossover-that-looks-like-a-truck provides a better ride than a traditional pickup and gets an awesome lockable trunk right in the floor of the bed. And it doesn’t do the truck stuff too badly, either, as it’s able to carry 1,860 pounds of payload and tow 3,500 pounds.The Ridgeline is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 good for 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. That is channeled through a six-speed automatic transmission with available all-wheel drive. It’s built in Lincoln, Alabama. 18 Photos 2019 Chevy Colorado ZR2 Bison: An off-road animal 81 Photos Jaguar’s I-Pace gets the Waymo treatment 38 Photos 2019 Honda Pilot Elite: A smoother, tech-rich crossover SUV 4last_img read more

Rohingyas flee no mans land after Myanmar threat

first_imgThis photo taken on 27 February, 2018 shows Myanmar army personnel keeping watch as Myanmar workers build a fence along the Myanmar-Bangladesh border, as seen from Tombru in the Bangladeshi district of Bandarban. Photo: AFPHundreds of Rohingya living in no man’s land have left their makeshift camp and crossed into Bangladesh after soldiers from Myanmar used loud hailers to threaten them, community leaders said Wednesday.Around 6,000 Rohingya have been living on a thin stretch of land between the two countries since fleeing Myanmar in the wake of a brutal military crackdown on the Muslim minority in late August.They were among the first to flee Myanmar when the violence erupted last year and set up makeshift shelters in no man’s land in the weeks before Bangladesh agreed to let the Rohingya into the country.In recent weeks they have come under pressure from soldiers who have stepped up patrols along the barbed wire border fence just yards (metres) away from the camp and broadcast messages using loud hailers ordering the Rohingya to leave.Community leader Dil Mohammad said the messages had spread panic through the camp.”We can’t now sleep peacefully. Most of the Rohingya in the camps now want to flee and take shelter in Bangladesh,” Mohammad said.”Around 150 families have already left the camp for Bangladesh as they were afraid they might be forcefully sent back to Rakhine,” he told AFP, referring to the area of Myanmar where the Rohingya used to live.One Border Guard Bangladesh official said the Myanmar soldiers were playing the announcement at least 10 to 15 times a day.In it, they urge the Rohingya to leave, saying the land they are on is under their jurisdiction and threatening them with prosecution if they remain.Last week Bangladesh and Myanmar officials visited the camp and urged the refugees to return to Rakhine.But community leaders have said they won’t go back unless their demands for citizenship and security guarantees are met.Myanmar views the Rohingya as illegal settlers from Bangladesh and has long denied them citizenship and basic rights.Nearly 700,000 have fled since the military backed by Buddhist mobs launched a brutal crackdown last year in the wake of militant attacks on police posts.Doctors without Borders has said 6,700 Rohingya were killed in the first month of the violence alone in a campaign the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing.Most of the refugees are now living in camps in Bangladesh.The Bangladesh government has signed an agreement with Myanmar to repatriate them, but the refugees themselves say they do not want to return.Bangladesh was supposed to start the repatriation process last month but it has been delayed amid concerns over a lack of preparation.Myanmar forces have also erected a kilometres-long barbed wire fence along the border in recent weeks and installed multiple outposts with armed guards and loudspeakers, the refugees said.last_img read more

Germany France voice cautious hope on Ukraine peace revival process

first_imgGerman foreign minister Heiko Maas attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin, Germany on 6 June 2018. Germany and France voiced cautious optimism Monday that Russia and Ukraine will take steps to revive the long-stalled peace process in the smouldering Ukraine war that has claimed 10,000 lives. Photo: ReutersGermany and France voiced cautious optimism Monday that Russia and Ukraine will take steps to revive the long-stalled peace process in the smouldering Ukraine war that has claimed 10,000 lives.Despite high tensions between Western powers and president Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the four foreign ministers held their first meeting since early last year to revitalise a long ignored truce agreement.After “countless ceasefire violations” in recent months, said the Berlin talks’ host, Germany’s top diplomat Heiko Maas, “it was all the more necessary that we have met again here after 16 months.”Russia and Ukraine had again formally committed to the key tenets of the 2015 Minsk agreement, brokered by Germany and France, he said.”All sides once more voiced support for a lasting ceasefire, including the withdrawal of heavy weapons, the disengagement of troops and demining, and the protection and granting of access to the OSCE Observer Mission,” he said.Russia’s Sergei Lavrov said that “of course we have not been able to solve all the problems related to the implementation of the Minsk agreements to settle the internal Ukrainian crisis, but I believe that this meeting was very useful.”‘Positive dynamic’ Lavrov said both sides had discussed a ‘road map’ for a prisoner exchange of people being held by Kiev and Moscow, reported state news agency RIA Novosti.French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian also saw “a positive dynamic for what I hope will be a peaceful solution”, adding that Paris and Berlin had offered to assist in demining operations.In the long run, he said, “we are ready to work on the parameters of a possible United Nations mission for eastern Ukraine when the implementation of the Minsk agreements will allow it”.Even if the guns were to fall silent, that issue is tricky.While Moscow favours blue-helmet troops only along the frontline, Kiev would want them to also police the Ukraine-Russian border to prevent soldiers and weapons from crossing.Despite the continued bloodshed, the Ukraine conflict has been half-forgotten by the West amid other crises and its own divisions, and as France, Germany and Russia have all been caught up in their own elections over the past year.The UN Security Council last week condemned “continuous violations of the ceasefire” and “the tragic humanitarian situation” on the frontline.In a rare phone call Saturday to prepare for the meeting, Putin and Ukraine’s Petro Poroshenko discussed an “exchange of people being held” by both sides.But given the deepening distrust between the West and Russia, hopes of a diplomatic breakthrough were always low.The conflict began when a 2014 popular Ukrainian uprising ousted a Kremlin-backed president in Kiev and Russia moved to annex the Crimea peninsula, backing insurgents in the former Soviet state.Brussels responded to the territorial grab with stinging economic sanctions, with Moscow retaliating in kind. ‘Severe consequences’ Since then, east-west tensions have spiralled to a new post-Cold War low.The US and European powers have accused Moscow of using hackers and propaganda to sow discord, meddle in elections and back eurosceptics and right-wing populists, as well as ramping up military posturing to threaten eastern European states.Putin, who was re-elected to a fourth term in March, has denied all the charges and argued forcefully that hostile NATO powers are seeking to demonise and weaken Russia.Moscow also accused Kiev of spreading “bizarre” fake news after Ukraine’s secret service last month staged the murder of Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko, claiming it did so to foil a Russian plot on his life.Heightening tensions, Putin on Thursday warned that any military “provocations” during the World Cup football tournament which Russia is hosting, would have “very severe consequences for Ukraine as a state”.Russia’s main goal is the lifting of damaging economic sanctions, a push aided by the rise of sympathetic populist parties in the EU, most recently in Italy.France and Germany agree that any sanctions relief for Russia must be conditional on advances in the Ukraine peace process.last_img read more

Houston Honors Legacy Of The Buffalo Soldiers

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /01:46 Amy BishopRiders from Pennsylvania taking part in Buffalo Soldiers commemorationThe Buffalo Soldiers were African-American men who served in the U.S. Army until the mid-20th century. On a sweltering hot afternoon at Houston’s Tom Bass Park, about a dozen young African-American teenage boys are on horseback, dressed in traditional cavalry attire. They’re taking part in a ceremonial ride to commemorate the Buffalo Soldiers.One of the teens involved is Michael, whose group came from Pennsylvania for the event.“I didn’t know too much about the Buffalo Soldiers,” he admits. “But when I got into it, and the riding and things like that, I started researching a little more to get a better understanding of what I’m doing it for.”Amy BishopTeenage riders from Pennsylvania taking part in Buffalo Soldiers commemoration at Tom Bass ParkThis week marks the 150th anniversary of the Buffalo Soldiers and Houston is hosting the celebration. People from around the country have been here for events all week, including 92-year-old Henri Legandre, a World War 2 vet from North Carolina. He was part of the last chapter of the soldiers before they were disbanded in the 1950s when the military became integrated. “In World War 2, we really fought two wars,” Legandre explains. “We fought the war for the United States, but we also fought the war for segregation.”On Saturday, a parade of about 150 horses and wagons went through Houston’s Midtown and Third Ward, beginning at Emancipation Park and ending at the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum.“The Buffalo Soldiers is a missing link in the American history story,” says Cpt. Paul J. Matthews, the museum’s founder, who was instrumental in organizing the week’s festivities. “And so most people think this is an African-American museum, but this is an American history museum.”The museum will also serve as the new national headquarters of the Buffalo Soldiers Association.Amy BishopTeenage riders from Pennsylvania taking part in Buffalo Soldiers commemoration at Tom Bass Park Listen X Sharelast_img read more

Advocates Call Attention to Chemical Contamination of Minority Communities

first_imgAs the nation ruminates on the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement this Black History Month, environmental justice activists are calling attention to what they say is the new frontline of the human rights struggle: chemical contamination of communities of color. “When corporations decide where to build chemical plants, landfills, or water treatment plants where chemicals leach, they most often choose low income communities of color,” Richard Moore, a long-time civil rights and environmental justice leader with the Environmental Justice and Health Alliance for Chemical Policy Reform, said in a statement. “This is the next frontier of the Civil Rights Movement,” Michele Roberts, co-coordinator for the alliance, told the AFRO. “People of color and the poor have borne the brunt of exposure to toxins and have a disproportionate share of health issues because of the prevalence of chemical sites in their communities. You even have people migrating because they are losing their communities.” Roberts pointed to Mossville, a town just outside Lake Charles, La. that was built by Black freedmen in the late 1700s, and now faces a corporate buyout because “they are surrounded by 14 of the most toxic facilities ever.” The environmental justice movement began in the 1960s when farm workers organized by Cesar Chavez fought for workplace rights, including protection from toxic pesticides in California fields, and when African-American students took to the streets of Houston to oppose a city dump that claimed the lives of two children. But the movement truly took off in 1982 when residents from Warren County, N.C., a poor, rural and overwhelmingly Black jurisdiction, fought to block the dumping of 6,000 truckloads of soil laced with toxic PCBs in their community. “For us, environmental justice is about protecting where we live, play, work and pray,” Roberts said. She added of the history, “Grassroots communities came together to form the environmental justice movement. They looked at what Dr. [Martin Luther] King said about creating the ‘Beloved Community’ and honed in on that to say that we must have environmental remediation and policies in those communities.” Those early efforts led President Bill Clinton to issue Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations,” in 1994. But activists complain that Clinton’s executive order and other laws, such as the General Duty Clause of the Clean Air Act which requires facilities that produce, process, handle or store hazardous substances to take proactive measures to prevent accidental releases, are not being implemented. Despite strides in legislation and executive actions, “communities continue to experience disasters,” Roberts said. “What we now need are standards and regulations to enforce these laws and protect these communities now and for future generations.” On Jan. 9, a West Virginia chemical spill contaminated the water supply of nine counties, leaving 300,000 people without drinking water. On Dec. 20, an explosion at the Axiall plant near Mossville, La., sent several people to the hospital. In August, an explosion at a West, Texas fertilizer plant killed 15 people. On June 13, a chemical explosion in Geismar, La., killed one person, injured at least 75 others and released a plume of toxic fumes across the area. President Obama’s Executive Order 13650, “Improving Chemical Safety and Security,” mandates “listening sessions” across the country, with the next scheduled for Feb. 27 in Newark, N.J. At the meetings, stakeholders who live and work near chemical plants have the chance to express their concerns. Roberts said the move signals new momentum in the thrust for chemical policy reform and the environmental justice movement. “I really believe we have a very strong chance because we’re getting more and more people involved” including the United Steelworkers, health advocates and more, Roberts said. “If we work collectively together, especially in the waning years of this administration, we would be able to get the reforms we need to protect our communities.”last_img read more