STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Deeanna Mallett Named To Deans List At Keene State

first_imgKEENE, NH — Keene State College has announced that the following Wilmington student has been named to the Fall 2018 Dean’s List:Deeanna MallettAbout Keene State CollegeKeene State College is a preeminent public liberal arts college that ensures student access to world-class academic programs. Integrating academics with real-world application and active community and civic engagement, Keene State College prepares graduates to meet society’s challenges by thinking critically, acting creatively, and serving the greater good. To learn more about Keene State College, visit http://www.keene.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Keene State College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Keene State CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Pumphret & Rae Named To Dean’s List At Keene StateIn “Education”Wilmington’s Mallett, Mazzie & Rae Named To Dean’s List At Keene StateIn “Education”last_img read more

French policeman killed in attack claimed by IS

first_imgA known terror suspect shot dead a French policeman and wounded two others Thursday on Paris’s Champs Elysees in an attack claimed by the Islamic State group days before a presidential election.Observers had long feared bloodshed ahead of Sunday’s vote in France following a string of atrocities since 2015 and the violence is likely to thrust security to the front of voters’ minds.The shooter opened fire with an automatic weapon on a police van on the world-famous boulevard at around 9:00 pm (1900 GMT), prompting tourists and visitors to run for their lives.After killing the officer and injuring his colleagues just a few hundred metres from the Arc de Triomphe, the gunman was shot dead in return fire while trying to flee on foot, police sources told AFP.A statement from the Islamic State group published by its propaganda agency Amaq said the attacker was “one of the Islamic State’s fighters.”The killer, identified as a 39-year-old French man, was known to anti-terror police, sources told AFP, and raids took place at his address in a suburb to the east of Paris.He was arrested in February on suspicion of plotting to kill officers but was released because of lack of evidence.He had been convicted in 2005 of three counts of attempted murder, with two of these against police officers, sources said.The impact on the outcome of the French election is unclear — Sunday is the poll’s first round — but far-right leader Marine Le Pen, her centrist rival Emmanuel Macron, and scandal-hit conservative Francois Fillon cancelled campaign events planned for Friday.Up until now, surveys showed voters more concerned about unemployment and their spending power than terrorism or security, though analysts warned this would change in the event of violence.The shooting comes two days after the arrest of two men in southern Marseille with weapons and explosives who were suspected of preparing an attack to disrupt the campaign.French President Francois Hollande promised “absolute vigilance, particularly with regard to the electoral process” and paid tribute to the police.Hollande, who said he was convinced the shooting was a “terrorist act”, cancelled a trip to Bretagne and will chair a security cabinet meeting Friday.Security in campaignAnti-immigration contender Le Pen earlier welcomed security moving to the heart of the campaign as she took part in a prime-time interview show alongside 10 other presidential candidates.”We are suffering the consequences of a laxity that has continued for years,” she said shortly before the shooting, promising to take a hard line against extremists and anyone suspected of being an Islamist.For weeks, former banker Macron and Le Pen have been out in front but opinion polls now show there is a chance that any of four leading candidates could reach the election’s second-round runoff on May 7.Conservative candidate Fillon and far-left firebrand Jean-Luc Melenchon have closed the gap substantially in the last two weeks.”The first responsibility of the president is to protect,” Macron said on the interview show. “This threat will be part of our daily lives in the next years.”Fillon, who penned a pre-election book called “Beating Islamic Totalitarianism”, declared that “the fight against terrorism must be the absolute priority of the next president.”As the first details of the attack filtered through, US President Donald Trump said that “it looks like another terrorist attack. What can you say? It just never ends.”German Chancellor Angela Merkel sent her condolences.State of emergencyThe bustling Champs Elysees lies in the heart of Paris and is lined with shops and restaurants. It was immediately blocked by armed officers after the attack and nearby metro stations were closed.”We had to hide our customers in the basement,” Choukri Chouanine, manager of a restaurant near the site of the shooting, told AFP, saying there was “lots of gunfire.”A spokesman for the interior ministry paid tribute to the fast reflexes of police at the scene who managed to kill the gunman and prevent further bloodshed on a busy spring-time evening.A foreign tourist was slightly wounded in her knee by shrapnel during the shooting.France is in a state of emergency and at its highest possible level of terror alert, with jihadist-inspired assaults killing more than 230 people in recent years.The Charlie Hebdo magazine was hit in January 2015, sites around Paris including the Bataclan concert hall were targeted in November the same year, and families at a fireworks display in Nice in July 2016.There have also been smaller attacks, often aimed at security forces.Thousands of troops and armed police have been deployed to guard tourist hotspots such as the Champs Elysees or other potential targets, including government buildings and religious sites.last_img read more

Online Lifestyle Retailers Are Turning Into Magazines

first_imgBut producing editorial content that rivals the output of top magazines — the standard to which Gilt aspires — is no easy feat. “People forget that to do this well you need to have the right team and you need to carve out the right ecosystem within a business that isn’t necessarily set up to do editorial,” says Thoreson. “If you just treat it as some sort of commodity, you’re likely not going to succeed here.”But with U.S. online retail sales expected to grow to $262 billion this year from $231 billion in 2012, it’s worth doing what it takes to claim a bigger slice of the ecommerce pie. And already this kind of content is becoming expected for companies who want to stand out. Over the past three years, he says, a commitment to quality editorial “has gone from something that’s a novelty [for ecommerce brands] to something that’s an essential.”But however important content marketing is for online retailers now, it is as merchants, not publishers, that Bureau of Trade and other new-wave companies will ultimately succeed or fail. The women behind Zady understand this. “At the end of the day, Zady is a wonderful and beautiful ecommerce site,” Darabi says.Related: Struggling With Online Sales? So Are the Big Guys Models present clothing from Frank & Oak’s Fall/Winter 2014 collection during New York Fashion Week on September 8, 2013.Image credit: Brian Patrick Eha Lend us your earsFor brands that want to be more than mere online shops, maintaining a consistent editorial voice is paramount. The arch, worldly tone of the Bureau’s editorial — “more John Cleese than Gawker” — is “the reason we were able to raise any money at all,” Moskowitz says. (The Bureau raised $1.2 million in seed money in September 2012 from Foundation Capital and others.) “They want this voice. That’s what people had a visceral reaction to.”As for how he arrived at the proper tone for the Bureau’s emails and other editorial, says Moskowitz, “I wanted a buttoned-up sense of Fifties formality, because that’s what helps jokes land.” Case in point: a racy video, made in partnership with Esquire for the Bureau’s Japan Rising collection, which explains shibori, the ancient Japanese art of dying fabric. In the video, a dominatrix stuffs a shibori cotton pocket square into a client’s mouth to silence him. It’s an image not soon forgotten.Zady founders Maxine Bédat, 31, and Soraya Darabi, 30, say their editorial voice aims to be “an authentic voice for our generation.” Zady launched with an eye toward rescuing people from the soullessness of fast fashion, and its founders’ own sense of the zeitgeist is what determines the editorial content. The retailer produces two types of stories: brand stories, which Bédat says are fundamental to the company’s mission, and standalone features. The former are based on interviews that Bédat and Darabi conduct with every brand they sell, dissecting what makes them special. The latter have no direct connection to the products Zady sells. Whether they realized it or not, guests were holding in their hands the vanguard of a growing trend among ecommerce brands: the convergence of online retail and editorial content. Increasingly, digital retailers are finding value in weaving story elements around their products as a way of compensating for the lack of the sensory experience one finds in brick-and-mortar stores. And some are going even further, commissioning words and images with no obvious sales component.Fashion marketplaces Net-a-Porter and Gilt Groupe pioneered the trend, and over the past three years it has snowballed. A new wave of ecommerce startups is now getting traction in the marketplace by marrying high-quality editorial with online shops boasting fast delivery, excellent customer service and lust-worthy products.Related: In New Venture, Bonobos Co-Founder Reimagines the Way Men ShopIt’s a strategy that is paying off for Frank & Oak, which received $5 million last October from Lightbank and other investors. Some of that money was put toward editorial efforts. Right now, three of the company’s 100 employees focus entirely on researching and creating stories. While that may seem like a small fraction, it is a sign that the company is serious about educating and entertaining its customers.”Especially for guys, contextualizing clothing makes a lot of sense,” says Ethan Song, 29, Frank & Oak’s co-founder and creative director. “Clothing is not just clothing.”Narrative merchandiseMichael Phillips Moskowitz, founder of one-year-old startup Bureau of Trade, wants nothing to do with unmemorable junk. The Bureau, as it’s called, curates “narrative merchandise” — unique clothing and lifestyle items, even classic cars and taxidermied scorpions — for discerning men and makes the goods available for purchase online. “Precious pieces,” the 35-year-old Moskowitz calls them.His New York City-based team of five is supplemented by eight part-time curators in cities around the world, from Los Angeles to Tel Aviv, all of whom are tasked with finding stylish clothes, interesting books, vintage watches, antique furniture and other desirables for the Bureau. Some are found on eBay and Craigslist; others are sourced from trusted boutiques. Moskowitz himself spends time overseas once a quarter, hunting in shops, bazaars and souks. When he finds a merchant with an item he wants for the Bureau, he talks him into putting it online. The Bureau gets a cut of every purchase made through its website.The goods are grouped by theme, often something au courant, though Moskowitz has also organized larger collections. Continental Rift, for instance, focused on Africa, with droll teaser videos released in the days before its launch. Either way, each item is tied to a larger story. “Storytelling and commerce are inseparable,” Moskowitz says. “Otherwise it’s just stuff.” Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Zady co-founders Maxine Bedat and Soraya Darabi want to put an end to soulless fast fashion with their venture-backed startup.Image credit: Zady September 13, 2013 On a warm Sunday in September, stylish men and women lined up on a street in New York City’s Meatpacking District to see a preview of the fall/winter collection of Frank & Oak, an ecommerce startup for menswear. It was the brand’s first presentation during New York Fashion Week, so it was something of a coming-out party.Inside, the bare industrial space evoked the workshop of famed inventor Nikola Tesla, complete with work table, assorted tools and a faux electricity machine. On plywood platforms, 12 models stood facing the crowd, dressed to ward off the winter chill. There was a green tweed suit, a double-breasted glen plaid blazer, a chunky white cable-knit sweater and, of course, the obligatory scarf or two.The crowd passed through in shifts. As they left the workshop, guests were each handed something unusual: a copy of the inaugural issue of Frank & Oak’s own quarterly magazine, The Edit. Printed on heavyweight environmental paper, issue No. 1 is 26 pages long, features actor and designer Waris Alhuwalia on its cover and is full of words and visuals designed to appeal to Frank & Oak’s customers. Along with a profile of Alhuwalia, there is a piece about Montreal-based furniture company À Hauteur d’Homme, which has designed a men’s valet for Frank & Oak, and a photo feature on what to pack for a fall trip to Portland. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img 10 min read One feature is an interview with a New York Times photo editor who produced a Kickstarter-funded documentary about horse-rearing customs in Iceland. It seems a strange thing to find on a fashion retailer’s website. “We think that the kind of customer who likes a story about denim made in North Carolina will also like a story about a beautiful documentary about wild horses in Iceland,” Bédat says. She admits it’s a hunch. “Time will tell us if that’s true or not.” For now, they can afford to experiment; Zady received $1.35 million in October 2012 from New Enterprise Associates and others.Where Frank & Oak is building a dedicated editorial team, Zady is using serious freelance journalists to create its content. A feature on work-life integration — as opposed to the impossible ideal of work-life balance — carries the byline of Melissa Wall, the founding editor of Newsweek’s iPad edition. “We’re trying to define where we are culturally,” Bédat says of the feature’s subject matter. “So far, our intuition seems to be on point.”A shopping community”You’re essentially trying to build a community of like-minded individuals around your brand,” Thoreson says of such efforts. Admittedly, the ROI picture is “murkier” with content that isn’t tied to products, but such editorial is “no less powerful” as a branding tool, he says.Since Frank & Oak’s founding in February 2012, 800,000 people have signed up for its members-only site, with the majority of customers living in the U.S., Song says. And many who have downloaded the Frank & Oak mobile app access the app every day. As Song sees it, that represents a major shift in how brands are built and how consumers interact with products. “You’d never walk into a store every day,” he points out.Fashion and style magazines, as Moskowitz is quick to note, have always excelled at narrative — and at the related art of cultivating desire. To hear him tell it, online retailers now have the chance to be like magazines, only better, because they can indulge the impulse to buy. “GQ isn’t shoppable,” he says. “Esquire isn’t shoppable.” Ethan Song, co-founder and creative director of Frank & Oak, collaborating with Ricardo Hinojosa, a Mexican artisan who has made wallets and cardholders for Frank & Oak. Hinojosa’s business partner, Jose Antonio Echeverria, looks on.Image credit: Samuel Pasquier Lend us your ears It isn’t surprising that a retailer who aspires to be “the merchandise equivalent of the Library of Alexandria” cares about the provenance of his wares. But he goes further, saying that as local and regional ties have loosened their hold over the past century, and racial and ethnic differences have become less contentious, our identities have come to be defined primarily by what we buy, where we eat, how we shop and other markers of cultural consumption.It’s an idea that has been voiced by Tyler Brûlé, founder of media brand Monocle, which serves the global cosmopolitan elite, and others: In today’s world, possessions evidence character. In its extreme formulation, it’s the idea that, at least in the eyes of others, we are what we surround ourselves with. By marrying shopping with storytelling, brands such as Bureau of Trade and Zady, a New York City-based fashion retailer that launched this month, charge what might otherwise be mere acquisitiveness with the primal human need for meaning.”Online shopping is increasingly about exploration,” says Tyler Thoreson, vice president of men’s editorial, creative and customer experience for Gilt. “It’s less transactional.”It’s a mistake to look for an immediate return on your investment in editorial, he says. Brand visibility, goodwill, excitement, customer loyalty — these are the things it achieves. “You have to ask yourself what your goals are. Is it [sales] conversion, or is it marketing and branding?”Related: The Family Behind Luxury Lingerie Business Cosabella Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more