North Caicos man jailed for incest violates own daughter

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppGrand Turk, TCI, January 16, 2017 – The Prosecutor’s Office and Police have secured a conviction for a 53 year old man who has confessed to the most sickening of crimes; incest and buggery of his own 8-year old daughter.John Lightbourne of North Caicos this morning confessed to sexually assaulting his primary school aged child in July 2016.   The 53 year old, who is a fisherman and carpenter, lives in North, the child is a resident of Provo and while he could have gotten life for the crime, he was sentenced to a mere eight years and is now jailed at Her Majesty’s prison in Grand Turk.The two charges – incest and buggery – will run concurrently.  The sentencing was handed down by Robert Schuster, Supreme Court judge.#MagneticNewsMedia#JohnLightbourne Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp TCI Premier blasts Opposition side for “slop” information, sets it straight in HOA Nearly 30 Haitians caught following illegal landing in Nassau, says Defence Force Recommended for you Related Items:#JohnLightbourne, #MagneticNewsMedia Bahamas Police Commissioner Greenslade gone to UK, appointed as High Commissionerlast_img read more

Millipede trapped in amber for 99 million years gets its moment to

first_img 20 Photos A spider’s erection, and other cool things trapped in amber Tick’s ‘worst day ever’ frozen in amber for 100 million years Tailed spider found in amber will crawl into your nightmares Tags Comments Enlarge ImageThe newly described millipede (Burmanopetalum inexpectatum) stuck in amber. Leif Moritz A tiny millipede stuck in amber has had 99 million years to contemplate its sticky predicament. The itsy insect didn’t live to enjoy its 2019 coming-out party as a scientific curiosity, but the rest of us can marvel at the remarkable specimen.The millipede is trapped in Cretaceous-era amber found in Myanmar. Researchers determined the millipede is the first fossil found from the order Callipodida, but it was strange enough to require a new suborder. It’s now called “Burmanopetalum inexpectatum,” with the latter word meaning “unexpected” in Latin.millipede3dEnlarge ImageThe researchers created this 3D model of the millipede. Leif Moritz The team created a 3D model of the 0.3-inch (8.2-millimeter) millipede to more closely study its anatomy.”With the next-generation micro-computer tomography (micro-CT) and the associated image rendering and processing software, we are now able to reconstruct the whole animal and observe the tiniest morphological traits which are rarely preserved in fossils,” said zoologist Pavel Stoev of the National Museum of Natural History in Bulgaria.Stoev is the lead author of a paper on the millipede published this week in the journal ZooKeys. The Callipodida order of millipedes still exists today, with over 100 species crawling around the planet. This particular fossil was the only one of its order found among over 500 millipede specimens trapped in the same amber deposit.  Paleontologycenter_img Sci-Tech Fossil arthropod expert Greg Edgecombe from the Natural History Museum in London welcomed Burmanopetalum inexpectatum to the club of ancient amber-encased millipedes. “In the past few years, nearly all of the 16 living orders of millipedes have been identified in this 99-million-year-old amber,” Edgecombe said. Congratulations, little millipede, you’re a trailblazing representative for your order. Share your voice 2 Trapped in amberlast_img read more