Gabby Douglas Reveals the Extent of Pain She Felt

Gabby Douglas (@gabbycvdouglas/Instagram)After facing a barrage of online criticism and harassment during the 2016 Olympic Games, gymnast Gabby Douglas is finally speaking out.The three-time gold medalist, who was heavily criticized about her hair at the 2012 Beijing Olympics, faced similar condemnation this year along with accusations of a lack of patriotism and poor sportsmanship. For Douglas, the recrimination was hurtful.“I had [to] take off social media before the Olympics,” Douglas told Teen Vouge on Facebook Live Wednesday, Dec. 21. “Then, after team finals in Rio, I Googled myself and there was just so much noise. First, it started with me not having my hand over my heart, then my hair, then me not being supportive. I was like, ‘Oh my God, I have no idea where this is coming from.’ It was hard.”Online commenters reignited the 2012 fury over Douglas’ hair during the Games in Rio De Janerio, Brazil, in August. One person proclaimed the 20-year-old’s tresses “makes me so mad.”Then, Douglas stood at attention during the national anthem but didn’t place her hand over her heart like the rest of her Final Five teammates. In reaction, a Twitter user deemed Douglas a “sorry American.” Finally, when teammate Simone Biles won gold in the women’s individual all-around, Twitter took aim at Douglas for allegedly feeling salty over the triumph.“Every single day, I’d come back to the village after every single training practice and I literally bawled my eyes out,” Douglas said. “I would cry and cry and cry because people were being so mean.”The judgment visibly took a toll on the gymnast towards the end of the Olympics, when USA Today reported Douglas seemed to be holding back tears as she scrolled through her phone.Douglas also addressed criticism about her serious demeanor during the 2016 Games, noting she had simply grown up since she last competed in the Olympics at age 16.“Going from 2012, I was this smiley, bubbly Gabby,” she explained. “And in 2014 to 2016, I was like, ‘I’ll be a little more mature, a little more sass.’ And everyone was like, ‘What’s wrong with her? She’s not smiling, something’s wrong.’ And I’m like, ‘No, this is mature Gabby.’ I love to laugh, there’s nothing wrong with that. Just don’t put me in a category, you know? Let me do what I need to do out on the floor.”Douglas has advice for other people who have dealt with cyberbullying: Don’t change.“There’s [sic] people out there that love you guys and your life is very important and very valuable,” she said. “Always be strong and you can overcome it, you really can.” read more

Fast Company Names Stephanie Mehta EditorinChief

first_imgThe announcement notes that Mehta will be charged with oversight of Fast Company‘s editorial across print and digital, as well as its growing events business—including the annual Fast Company Innovation Festival in New York. Stephanie MehtaMansueto Ventures has tapped Vanity Fair deputy editor Stephanie Mehta as the next editor-in-chief of Fast Company, CEO Eric Schurenberg announced today.The announcement comes two months after Robert Safian, the magazine’s longtime editor-in-chief, revealed plans to step down after 11 years in the role. Safian has since gone on to found the media advisory firm Flux Group.Mehta arrives at Fast Company having spent the last two years at Vanity Fair, where she headed up the brand’s New Establishment Summit and Founders Fair conferences in addition to serving as one of the magazine’s deputy editors. Prior to Vanity Fair, Mehta spent about a year at Bloomberg Media running the Bloomberg Live event series, and before that had a long tenure at Fortune, where she rose to executive editor in 2010 and deputy managing editor in 2013. She began her career in the early ’90s as a staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal.“Having worked with Stephanie in the past, I know that she is an exacting journalist, a generous leader, and a warm colleague,” said Schurenberg (who also serves as editor-in-chief of sister title Inc.) in a prepared statement. “She is a true practitioner of smart business journalism and a fierce believer in Fast Company’s mission and its future as a brand. I couldn’t be more excited to have her on board.”last_img read more

Millipede trapped in amber for 99 million years gets its moment to

first_img 20 Photos A spider’s erection, and other cool things trapped in amber Tick’s ‘worst day ever’ frozen in amber for 100 million years Tailed spider found in amber will crawl into your nightmares Tags Comments Enlarge ImageThe newly described millipede (Burmanopetalum inexpectatum) stuck in amber. Leif Moritz A tiny millipede stuck in amber has had 99 million years to contemplate its sticky predicament. The itsy insect didn’t live to enjoy its 2019 coming-out party as a scientific curiosity, but the rest of us can marvel at the remarkable specimen.The millipede is trapped in Cretaceous-era amber found in Myanmar. Researchers determined the millipede is the first fossil found from the order Callipodida, but it was strange enough to require a new suborder. It’s now called “Burmanopetalum inexpectatum,” with the latter word meaning “unexpected” in Latin.millipede3dEnlarge ImageThe researchers created this 3D model of the millipede. Leif Moritz The team created a 3D model of the 0.3-inch (8.2-millimeter) millipede to more closely study its anatomy.”With the next-generation micro-computer tomography (micro-CT) and the associated image rendering and processing software, we are now able to reconstruct the whole animal and observe the tiniest morphological traits which are rarely preserved in fossils,” said zoologist Pavel Stoev of the National Museum of Natural History in Bulgaria.Stoev is the lead author of a paper on the millipede published this week in the journal ZooKeys. The Callipodida order of millipedes still exists today, with over 100 species crawling around the planet. This particular fossil was the only one of its order found among over 500 millipede specimens trapped in the same amber deposit.  Paleontologycenter_img Sci-Tech Fossil arthropod expert Greg Edgecombe from the Natural History Museum in London welcomed Burmanopetalum inexpectatum to the club of ancient amber-encased millipedes. “In the past few years, nearly all of the 16 living orders of millipedes have been identified in this 99-million-year-old amber,” Edgecombe said. Congratulations, little millipede, you’re a trailblazing representative for your order. Share your voice 2 Trapped in amberlast_img read more

Rohingyas flee no mans land after Myanmar threat

first_imgThis photo taken on 27 February, 2018 shows Myanmar army personnel keeping watch as Myanmar workers build a fence along the Myanmar-Bangladesh border, as seen from Tombru in the Bangladeshi district of Bandarban. Photo: AFPHundreds of Rohingya living in no man’s land have left their makeshift camp and crossed into Bangladesh after soldiers from Myanmar used loud hailers to threaten them, community leaders said Wednesday.Around 6,000 Rohingya have been living on a thin stretch of land between the two countries since fleeing Myanmar in the wake of a brutal military crackdown on the Muslim minority in late August.They were among the first to flee Myanmar when the violence erupted last year and set up makeshift shelters in no man’s land in the weeks before Bangladesh agreed to let the Rohingya into the country.In recent weeks they have come under pressure from soldiers who have stepped up patrols along the barbed wire border fence just yards (metres) away from the camp and broadcast messages using loud hailers ordering the Rohingya to leave.Community leader Dil Mohammad said the messages had spread panic through the camp.”We can’t now sleep peacefully. Most of the Rohingya in the camps now want to flee and take shelter in Bangladesh,” Mohammad said.”Around 150 families have already left the camp for Bangladesh as they were afraid they might be forcefully sent back to Rakhine,” he told AFP, referring to the area of Myanmar where the Rohingya used to live.One Border Guard Bangladesh official said the Myanmar soldiers were playing the announcement at least 10 to 15 times a day.In it, they urge the Rohingya to leave, saying the land they are on is under their jurisdiction and threatening them with prosecution if they remain.Last week Bangladesh and Myanmar officials visited the camp and urged the refugees to return to Rakhine.But community leaders have said they won’t go back unless their demands for citizenship and security guarantees are met.Myanmar views the Rohingya as illegal settlers from Bangladesh and has long denied them citizenship and basic rights.Nearly 700,000 have fled since the military backed by Buddhist mobs launched a brutal crackdown last year in the wake of militant attacks on police posts.Doctors without Borders has said 6,700 Rohingya were killed in the first month of the violence alone in a campaign the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing.Most of the refugees are now living in camps in Bangladesh.The Bangladesh government has signed an agreement with Myanmar to repatriate them, but the refugees themselves say they do not want to return.Bangladesh was supposed to start the repatriation process last month but it has been delayed amid concerns over a lack of preparation.Myanmar forces have also erected a kilometres-long barbed wire fence along the border in recent weeks and installed multiple outposts with armed guards and loudspeakers, the refugees said.last_img read more