Everyone seems to have the Mac Pro already – but its a

first_imgThe marketing strategy for the new “Mac Pro” sets Italian stereotypes back by 50 years #WWDC19 pic.twitter.com/8grHCJUkGp— Relatable Hermit (@RelatableHermit) June 4, 2019Whereas a (slightly…) more creative interpretation saw the Mac Pro reimagined as a towering skyscraper: @marcoarment with apples AR (Mac Pro site on https://t.co/bEk6S1h4OU) you can take the new Mac Pro to the beach! pic.twitter.com/3EoE3SeVqD— Simon Iannelli (@simonnelli) June 4, 2019Everyone knows you can’t compare apples and oranges — but this tweet shrinks down the AR Mac Pro to compare Apple and a banana: This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. So how much does the new Mac Pro … cost.You’re shitting me.You’re absolutely shitting me.My 16 core 32 thread Threadripper 1950x system only cost $1500.And $6k is the *entry* price. pic.twitter.com/uPWJS8Ql4U— The Nash is coming from inside the house (@Nash076) June 4, 2019A parody account of Jony Ive, Apple’s renowned hardware designer, shared in the grief of hard-up Apple devotees: Introducing new Mac Pro. pic.twitter.com/GeVLesfGWu— 루미논 카노네스~ (@atLuminon) June 4, 2019Criticism wasn’t just limited to the aesthetics. Users weren’t thrilled about the price, which starts from $5999 (~£4750). New mac pro + XDR screeb for sale. DM me for details! pic.twitter.com/jYSpvKLB9s— Frontliner ♫ (@djfrontliner) June 4, 2019 Thought it would be bigger. #macpro #mini pic.twitter.com/q89g7xfK8F— Bart Reardon (@bartreardon) June 4, 2019Of course, Twitter had plenty to say about the design of the Mac Pro itself, which the eagle-eyed among you may have noticed shares a resemblance with a certain cheese-compatible kitchen utensil:center_img It really is a shame that you only have two kidneys because that’s not going to be nearly enough to buy a fully-loaded revolutionary new Mac Pro.— ᴺᴼᵀ Jony Ive (@JonyIveParody) June 4, 2019Thankfully, this tweet offers a great cost-free alternative to revamping your set up to Apple’s latest and greatest hardware: We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Yeeee, the new Mac Pro pic.twitter.com/4LP1uALNYm— UsagiKun (@UsagiiKun_) June 4, 2019More creatively, this guy brought an AR Mac Pro to the beach with them (grumble grumble, in my day we made do with buckets and spades): Take a scroll down your social media feed and you’ll probably see your friends proudly displaying a brand new Mac Pro on their desk — but there’s less to it than meets the eye.Apple has enabled iPhones and iPads to view an AR model of the Mac Pro on the devices’ camera, accessible from the Apple website. Twitter users have taken gleefully to the concept, which lets you shrink or expand the desktop beyond its actual size.Related: Best DesktopsWe’ve had some fun with the app, and it’s impressive how well the AR works — it quickly appears on a flat surface in a good quality image, allowing you to see how the size compares in real life. We’re just a bit disappointed it doesn’t enable you to play around with the computer by taking off the shell or exploring the internals.Some Apple fans used the tool for bragging rights straight away: Make Mac Pro Grate Again pic.twitter.com/4y9Glf6ldE— Linus Tech Tips (@LinusTech) June 3, 2019A more woke user fretted about the cultural sensitivities of the design (complete with a delicious visual pun on Apple’s CEO): Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Court places Mike Weir Wine Inc in receivership company owes more than

first_img A man pours a bottle of Prosecco during a wine tasting at the Case Paolin farm, in Volpago del Montello, Italy on Oct. 15, 2018. A court placed Mike Weir Wine Inc. into receivership as the winery owes more than $6 million.Luca Bruno / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 0 Comments Share this storyCourt places Mike Weir Wine Inc. in receivership, company owes more than $6 million Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation TORONTO — A court has placed Mike Weir Wine Inc. into receivership as the winemaker owes more than $6 million.Court documents say the corporation that produced, marketed and sold wine from a Beamsville, Ont.-based winery, which closed somewhere around April 2018, owes the Masters champion golfer about $2.2 million and RBC about $4.3 million.Justice Hainey of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice appointed BDO Canada Ltd. the monitor Jan. 30 after Weir filed an application earlier in January asking the court to do so in order to arrange a sale that permits the buyer to take advantage of the spring growing season.Court documents say a company related to Robert McCown became the owner of 15 per cent of the corporation’s shares in 2013 and the remainder of its shares in October 2017.The corporation issued three promissory notes to Weir on Oct. 20, 2017 that it was to pay back a year later, but court documents allege it failed to repay what now amounts to roughly $2.2 million — some of which is secured against the winery and its physical assets.Some of the debt was to be forgiven if the winery was sold by the time repayment was due on the notes and the secured notes were repaid in full.After Weir’s application, McCown requested a brief adjournment to allow for the negotiation and closing of a sale to a potential purchaser of the winery who intends to make an offer over $7 million — enough to repay the corporation’s debts.He says the claim that the winery is in danger and needs a receiver to protect it “is incorrect.”He says the winery has been listed for sale since late 2017, but this is the first buyer who has indicated they will make an offer. The Canadian Press Facebook Aleksandra Sagan Twitter Join the conversation → More Comment Email Recommended For You’We were experiencing headwinds’ — Canopy Growth stock heads south on poor sales ramp-upDefining the future of Canadian competitiveness: How partnerships between industry and educational institutions can help lead the way forwardTrans Mountain construction work can go ahead as National Energy Board re-validates permitsDavid Rosenberg: Deflation is still the No. 1 threat to global economic stability — and central banks know itBank of Canada drops mortgage stress test rate for first time since 2016 Sponsored By: Reddit Featured Stories Court places Mike Weir Wine Inc. in receivership, company owes more than $6 million February 4, 20191:50 PM ESTLast UpdatedFebruary 5, 20199:43 AM EST Filed under News FP Street advertisement ← Previous Next →last_img read more

LG Chem Hosts The Battery Challenge

Main point of interest for LG Chem are four categories:battery materialbattery management and controldesign, manufacturing and processingrecycle and regenerationLG Chem revealed that its automotive battery business has exceeded 60 trillion won (approx. $ 53.263 billion) in order backlog by the end of the first half of 2018, which sounds like hundreds of GWh.More info here: The Battery ChallengeFrom press release:LG Chem, South Korea’s leading manufacturer of advanced lithium-ion batteries, runs its first open innovation contest ‘The Battery Challenge’ to support start-ups specializing in new battery technology to strengthen its competitiveness in the industry.LG Chem is accepting applications until November 2nd. The fields of application are separated into four categories: ‘battery material’, ‘battery management and control’, ‘design, manufacturing and processing’ and ‘recycle and regeneration’. Start-ups can apply and receive detailed information through the official website. (https://batterychallenge.co/).The company asks all participants to submit their technology descriptions and business plans, which will then be carefully analyzed and evaluated to pick the top eight. Applications are encouraged to focus on technology and innovation in the battery sector. The selected companies will then be invited to ‘Demo Day’ in Silicon Valley, USA, around February of next year to present their business plans.The finalists will be selected through the holistic evaluation of each business plan and presentation, taking into account each start-up’s feasibility and marketability in the sector. LG Chem provides an opportunity to receive more than $1.9M in funding through a formal partnership agreement and will also continue to grow related technologies through joint research projects.Strengthening technological competitiveness through open innovation.LG Chem’s goal is to discover innovative technologies and enhance competitiveness through active open innovation.In June of this year, the company hosted the ‘Global Innovation Contest (GIC)’ in an effort to promote technical cooperation between LG Chem and academia. Prominent universities and research institutes from around the world took part, particularly those working on innovative technologies in five promising business areas: energy, environment, functional materials, biotechnology and platform technology.LG Chem’s ongoing effort to innovate is one of the many reasons why the company is now a leader in the battery industry. LG Chem has achieved numerous milestones since entering new business fields such as automobile batteries, ESS batteries and small batteries.The automotive battery business has secured global customers with its advanced technology and has exceeded 60 trillion won (approx. $ 53.263 billion) in order backlog by the end of the first half of 2018.On top of winning the ‘ees Award’ two years in a row at one of the world’s largest ESS exhibitions ‘ees Europe’, 2016 & 2017, LG Chem also took home America’s Brad Roberts Award in 2017. This is awarded by the Energy Storage Association (ESA) to honor the largest contributors to the development of the North American ESS industry each year. LG Chem’s ESS battery is widely recognized in the industry as a leading innovative technology.In addition, LG Chem has recently achieved remarkable growth in various business fields such as IT, where the launch of low-cobalt batteries for notebook computers in the small-sized battery business proved to be a great success. The company has achieved outstanding results in the battery business thanks to its top-of-the-line battery technology.LG Chem’s battery manufacturing method ‘Lamination & Stacking’ technology stacks electrodes and separator layers. This method increases energy density by maximizing the internal space efficiency of electric vehicles, ESS, smart phones and so on. In March of this year, LG Chem received the LG Research & Development Prize for ‘Free Form Battery,’ which utilizes this technology to realize the maximum capacity in the limited space found inside a smartphone.LG Chem plans to focus on R&D investment in the field of innovative batteries, which can far exceed the limits of conventional batteries, such as investment in high capacity electric cars, small batteries and high power ESS batteries with low cobalt content.Furthermore, the company will continue to strengthen its R&D in various areas, such as innovative batteries, through the active search and support for inspiring start-ups with innovative battery technologies. LG Chem looks for promising battery start-upsLG Chem announced a new initiative – The Battery Challenge – in the form of an open innovation contest for start-ups with new battery technologies.The South Korean company offers more than $1.9 million in funding to 8 selected start-up companies (applications are accepted until November 2) and the possibility to partner with LG Chem on joint technology development, access to commercialization opportunities, etc.LG Chem news Source: Electric Vehicle News Volkswagen Forms Battery Task Force With LG Chem LG Chem Forms 2 JVs In China For Up To 400,000 Battery Pack Per Year LG Chem Secures More Materials For Future Battery Production Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 19, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Jaguar Shows Off IPACE Before Formula E In Hong Kong

first_img Jaguar I-Pace Wins European Car Of The Year EV Range Test: Tesla Model X Vs. Audi e-tron & Jaguar I-Pace: Video Mitch Evans and Nelson Piquet Jr. from the Jaguar Racing ABB FIA Formula E team together with Darryl O’Young (first Hong Kong driver to participate to contest in the Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY) were invited to this electrifying launch. The drivers had a chance to speak about the race and some of the challenges they expect especially when the weather forecast shows to be a wet weekend. The I-PACE eTROPHY race on Sunday will give the Hong Kong audience a taste of what the first all-electric Jaguar can do on a race track before local customers getting their hands on their road version expected in Q3 2019.British Motors Limited, the local Jaguar dealer in Hong Kong will introduce 4 version of I-PACE for the local market. The price range from USD127,948 up to USD192,051 (including first registration tax) but customers can receive further rebates up to approx USD19,000 if current ICE owners apply for the 1 to 1 trade-in program (*if transport department criteria are met) where the old ICE vehicle must be sent to the junkyard to be scrapped. You can view the full specification below for each model. Watch Jaguar I-Pace Electric SUV Take On Snow & Ice: Video 9 photos Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News I-Pace makes Hong Kong debut.Hong Kong will be hosting the Formula E Championship this weekend for the third year. Besides introducing the Gen2 racer racing quietly through the city streets, a number of EV announcements have taken place throughout the week. Jaguar is one of the brands that was not shy to make some noise when officially unveiling the all-electric I-PACE in Hong Kong.More I-Pace Info Source: Electric Vehicle News Range and charging are definitely factors customers will consider when choosing an EV. The I-PACE houses a 90kWh Lithium-ion battery in its aluminum architecture. It is using 432 pouch cells delivers a range of 470km (WLTP cycle) that sits centrally between the two axles enabling a perfect 50:50 weight distribution and a low center of gravity. Owners can expect to achieve 80% charge in just 85mins using DC rapid charging (50kW) available at public charging station throughout the city. No announcements were made about providing Jaguar’s own charging station for the local market but will likely partner with local charging providers to serve owner needs.It has been definitely an exciting and promising week for EV development in Hong Kong. Let’s keep the momentum going to help reduce the carbon footprint and roadside pollution.last_img read more

DOE awards WAVE 84 million to develop charging platform for EV drayage

first_imgThe DOE has awarded $8.4 million to EV technology company WAVE (Wireless Advanced Vehicle Electrification) to develop and deploy high-power, fact-charging technology for EV drayage trucks at the Port of Los Angeles. WAVE will partner with Cummins, Schneider Electric, Utah State University and Total Transportation Services (TTSI) to develop a 500 kW wireless inductive charger , which transfers power from a charging pad to a receiving pad mounted on the vehicle’s undercarriage. The technology will be designed to allow TTSI’s EV drayage trucks to charge during cargo loading and unloading stops.WAVE CEO Michael Masquelier said, “This is a critical technology because battery electric commercial vehicles will play an important role in improving air quality in cities and ports, but charging infrastructure can be a barrier to their adoption.”TTSI founder and CEO Victor La Rosa said, “This is an important step in TTSI’s innovative push to reduce emissions throughout its terminal operations. Data gathered from this project will provide critical insights not only to TTSI but also to the port and freight sectors at large. The model that we are building will form a blueprint that any port operator looking to significantly reduce emissions can follow.”Source: WAVE Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

JAC ElectricOnly RideHailing Service — CleanTechnica Exclusive

first_imgChinese automaker JAC Motors (江淮汽车) launched an electric-only ride-hailing service called Hexing (Hexing on-line Hailing) (和行约车/Hexing Yueche) on the 9th of January in Hefei, Anhui, China. I have been monitoring this service since launch. Today, I will explain the service, its future expansion plan, and my experience in the vehiclesSource: CleanTechnica Car Reviews RSS Feedlast_img

Drones could 3Dmap scores of hectares of land in just a few

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Unmanned drones aren’t just for warfare. In recent years, they’ve been used to map wildlife and monitor crop growth. But current software can’t always handle the vast volume of images they gather. Now, researchers have developed an algorithm that will allow drones to 3D-map scores of hectares of land in less than a day—an advance that is important for cost-effective farming, disaster relief, and surveillance operations.“It is revolutionary for the problem of mosaicking large volumes of imagery,” says computer scientist Dalton Rosario of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Maryland, who was not involved with the study.Camera-equipped, autonomous, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can fly low to the ground and take high-resolution images of crops that tell farmers exactly where to plant their seeds or add fertilizers—at a tenth the cost of flying a plane or purchasing satellite images. To stitch the photos together into a mosaic, a computer program needs to figure out the exact angle and position of the camera for each picture taken in order to build a 3D model of the land. Conventional software does that by looking at common features in neighboring photos—for example, the same corn plant that appears in two images—and marking them with points called tie points. The software then tweaks its calculation of the camera positions for all the photos at once, so that when it projects the tie points onto a 3D model, points from different images match up to form a coherent projection of the corn plant. This method works well for a few hundred photos, but once the number of images exceed a thousand—typical for mapping a 40-hectare farm—the process can take 1000 hours, an impossible load for desktop computers. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img So computer scientist Mark Pritt and colleagues at Lockheed Martin in Gaithersburg, Maryland, took a different route. Their computer program directly projects the points from each photo onto a 3D space without knowing the exact shape of the land or the camera positions. As a result, the tie points don’t necessarily match up, which means the same corn plant can have two projections on the model. When that happens, the algorithm automatically takes the middle point between the two projections as the more accurate location and adjusts the camera position accordingly, one image at a time. Because the algorithm tweaks far fewer things at each step, the shortcut drastically speeds up calculations. Once the software has adjusted the camera positions for all the photos, the software repeats the entire process—starting from projecting the points to the 3D space—to correct for any errors.With the new algorithm, the researchers can produce a map from a thousand images in just 4 hours, they reported this month at the annual IEEE Applied Imagery Pattern Recognition Workshop. That means it can render a map of the land within 24 hours after the drones fly, giving farmers a head start on taking care of their crops and enabling them to use drones routinely to monitor crop health.The image-mosaicking algorithm can also speed up applications of drone imaging such as surveillance and disaster relief, says computer scientist Kannappan Palaniappan of the University of Missouri, Columbia, who was not involved with the study. When an earthquake strikes, for example, rescue teams could survey the affected area with drones and create a detailed 3D map of the damage in less than a day. The next step for researchers, Palaniappan says, is to improve the algorithm so that it can produce a map within minutes. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Solar cells—now in a rainbow of colors

first_imgSure, solar panels are good for the environment, but they’re so … boring. Now scientists have found a way to spice things up. In a study published online this month in Nano Letters, researchers describe making solar cells in several colors (pictured) that still perform efficiently. The scientists layered silicon dioxide, a common material to make glass optical fibers, and titanium dioxide, widely used to absorb harmful ultraviolet rays in sunscreens, alternately to create a structure called photonic crystal that can interact with light. Then they placed a layer of perovskite, the light-harvesting material, on top of the photonic crystal. The colors appear as a result of a combination of light reflected by the photonic crystal and absorbed by the perovskite; they can be changed by varying the thickness of individual silicon or titanium layers in the photonic crystal section. One downside: The colored cells are less efficient than their black counterparts, converting—at most—about 9% of the sunlight they receive into electricity, versus 25% for traditional cells. Still, the team hopes that the colorful cells could win over people averse to solar panels and boost solar adoption on buildings and other structures.last_img read more

Top stories Thinking soil dumb luck in science publishing and a science

first_imgOne of our reporters tried to do CRISPR. He failed miserablyScience staff writer Jon Cohen may be fluent in the language of biology, but the molecular complexities of CRISPR have long baffled him. So he decided to test what one scientist told him about the novel gene-editing technique: CRISPR (for “clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats”) is so simple to use that “any idiot” could do it. But Cohen is not just “any idiot.” You can watch him giving CRISPR his all in this video.See the first color images produced by an electron microscope Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In a macroscopic advance, scientists have taken the first multicolor images of cells using an electron microscope. Electron microscopes can magnify an object up to 10 million times, allowing researchers to peer into the inner workings of, say, a cell or a fly’s eye, but until now they’ve only been able to see in black and white. The new advance—15 years in the making—uses rare earth metals called lanthanides layered over cells on a microscope slide. So far, the researchers can only produce three colors—red, green, and yellow. But with a few more tweaks, researchers hope to add other colors to the mix soon.Hey scientists, how much of your publication success is due to dumb luck?What makes some scientists’ careers take off whereas others’ stagnate? There are personal factors, of course: Some run clever experiments, have good collaborating skills, and are eloquent in communicating their work. But there’s also dumb luck. A new study shows that some people who publish the same number of papers—even in the very same journals—get more citations than chance alone can explain. However, something called the Q-factor—which combines elements like eloquence, team-building skills, and creativity—might help. It takes a while to nail down: The authors found that calculating a scientist’s Q-factor requires at least 20 papers and 10 years of citations. But once they had it, they found that they could accurately predict the number of citations earned by that scientist’s 40th paper with 80% accuracy.How to cram your entire genome into a tiny nucleusOver the past decade, researchers have come to realize that how our DNA is bunched into the nucleus is a miracle of packaging, with very deliberate loops and bends that bring specific parts of each chromosome into contact to help control what genes are active. In a new study, researchers used statistical approaches to convert experimental data into a 3D model. Previous experiments—capturing when one bit of DNA came close to another bit of DNA—had provided only indirect information about individual connections, but the new modeling has resulted in a comprehensive, biologically correct depiction of how our DNA fits into a nucleus.‘Thinking soil’ made of bacteria could keep buildings from collapsingIt can be quite costly, even catastrophic, when the land under a building subsides. Now, a biodesigner and his colleagues have been pushing hard to develop biocement, a material that custom-built soil microbes would produce in response to the changing pressures in soil to help shore up the ground under foundations. They identified 122 bacterial genes that increased their activity by at least threefold by the pressure change. The team then modified the bacterial genome so that the regulatory DNA responsible for activating one of these genes was attached to a gene for a protein that glows when produced. The more pressure exerted on the microbe, the more intensely it glows. Eventually the researchers plan to replace the glowing protein gene with genes that make biocement, creating a “thinking soil” that will keep buildings safe and be a self-constructing foundation.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz! Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Jellyfish almost killed this scientist Now she wants to save others from

first_img Email Studies supported that hunch. In a 2012 paper in PLOS ONE, Yanagihara and a colleague reported that venom of Chironex fleckeri, one of the deadliest jellyfish species, rapidly punctures red blood cells, causing them to leak a huge amount of potassium ions. A high level of potassium in the blood, or hyperkalemia, causes cardiac arrest, and when Yanagihara injected mice with high doses of venom, their hearts quickly stopped. The same happened when she injected only the porins from the venom.In human jellyfish sting victims, however, autopsies show no signs of hemolysis, says Jamie Seymour, a prominent toxinologist at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia. He is skeptical that porins are the killers. In venom from C. fleckeri, his team instead found two distinct protein groups that specifically attack and kill human heart cells; those proteins are “the bit that will kill you,” he says.Seymour says he has unpublished evidence that Yanagihara’s technique for collecting venom deactivates the heart toxins along with other components. Winkel, too, is skeptical. He doesn’t contest that porins puncture red blood cells, but agrees with Seymour that hemolysis is not usually seen in sting victims. Porins should be tested on heart cells and tissues, he says, to find out whether they directly affect the heart.Yanagihara acknowledges that jellyfish venom contains other toxins, including molecules that break down lipids and proteins, but her studies convinced her that porins are the main and fastest killer. Recently, she and U.S. military researchers began to study how the venom affects piglets, which are physiologically much closer to humans than mice are. At a 2017 meeting in Florida, the group presented results showing they could reproduce both rapid death and Irukandji syndrome, depending on the dose of venom injected; the as-yet-unpublished findings also supported Yanagihara’s porin hypothesis.That hypothesis pointed to a remedy. In the PLOS ONE paper, Yanagihara showed that zinc gluconate inhibits porins and prolongs survival when injected into mice that had received a lethal dose of porins. Later, she found that copper gluconate works even better.On the basis of those findings—and heeding instructions from the U.S. Department of Defense, which had funded her work—Yanagihara developed two patented products under the brand name Sting No More to counter jellyfish envenoming. A spray helps remove tentacles clinging to the skin; it contains urea, which is thought to make tentacles less sticky, and vinegar, which older studies and Yanagihara’s own work had shown can deactivate unfired nematocysts. A cream containing copper gluconate is then applied to inhibit the injected venom. The products are used by U.S. military divers and sold on her website; dive shops in Hawaii carry them as well. She says she has yet to recoup her startup costs, in part because she gives the products away in developing countries.Yanagihara has also developed simpler ways to test how well her products and other interventions inhibit porins, including a bioassay consisting of human blood suspended in agar (a gelatin derived from seaweed) overlaid with a membrane from pig intestine. A live tentacle placed on the membrane immediately pierces it and injects venom into the agar; blood cells destroyed by porins show up as white patches against the vibrant red. Winkel calls the test “the closest we have to human skin and blood, short of getting an experiment on human volunteers,” and Yanagihara says it confirms her treatment’s effectiveness.”I was really impressed by the scientific rigor” in Yanagihara’s methods, says jellyfish ecologist Thomas Doyle at University College Cork in Ireland. In 2016, he worked with Yanagihara to test treatments for several species in Irish waters, including the lion’s mane (Cyanea capillata) and the Portuguese man-of-war (Physalia physalis), which resembles a jellyfish but belongs to a different class. Doyle and Yanagihara showed that treating stings with seawater and ice, as recommended in Irish guidelines that Doyle helped draft in 2008, actually worsens sting injury. He is now pushing to revise those guidelines. Targeting the heartScientists have three different theories to explain on how jellyfish venom, which attacks nerves, blood, and the heart, can cause cardiac arrest, the main cause of death after a sting. 2 Tubule unhingedThe pressure pushes open thenematocyst’s lid (operculum) and ejects the tubule. A hard- ened lancet at the tip of the tubule pierces the target, followed by the rest of the tubule, which turns inside-out as it leaves the nematocyst.Ion channel blockers may disrupt the flow of ions across the membranes of nerve and muscle cells, including those that keep the heart beating.Pore-forming proteins called porins poke holes in red blood cells, releasing a flood of potassium into the blood that may cause cardiac arrest. (Hemo- globin leaves the cells as well, causing them to lose their color.)Specific proteins in the venom may cause cardiac arrest by directly attacking muscle cells in the heart. A deadly carpetEmbedded in the surface of jellyfish tentacles are hundreds of thousands of cnidocytes, specialized cells that can inject venom when triggered. Inside each is a nematocyst, a capsule loaded with venom and a hollow, coiled tubule. By Yao-Hua LawNov. 8, 2018 , 2:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Human skinHuman skinCnidocyte V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE 3 Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Chironex fleckeri, one of the deadliest box jellyfish species, has left its mark on a patient’s leg in North Queensland in Australia. Most of the 4000 species of jellyfish cause only pain and discomfort when they sting humans. Only Cubozoans, or box jellyfish, of which some 50 species inhabit tropical and temperate seas around the globe, are fatal. They take their name from their cubic body, which has between four and 15 tentacles up to 3 meters long growing from each of the four corners. The tentacles are carpeted with hundreds of thousands of specialized cells, each harboring a capsule called a nematocyst that can fire a microscopic harpoon at speeds of more than 60 kilometers per hour. The harpoon carries a spiny hollow tube that injects venom after it strikes a victim.Yanagihara, born in Alaska, hadn’t planned to study jellyfish. But in 1997, the year she obtained her Ph.D. at UH for research on cellular ion channels, the jellyfish found her. One day that year, Yanagihara swam out to sea before dawn—”My father taught me to swim before I walked,” she says—when she encountered a swarm of box jellyfish some 500 meters offshore. She felt needles burning into her neck and arms and her lungs collapsing; her arms began to fail. She switched to a breathing technique she had learned for childbirth and clawed back to shore in agony, “like an automaton.” The pain kept her in bed for 3 days. After she recovered, she wanted to know what almost killed her.In some cases, box jellyfish venom causes Irukandji syndrome, in which an overload of stress hormones and inflammation proteins produces pain and nausea for days, as well as high blood pressure that can lead to brain hemorrhage and death. Most sting casualties, however, die within minutes from cardiac arrest. The prevailing hypothesis 20 years ago was that the culprits are ion channel blockers, molecules that disrupt movement of ions in and out of cells. The blockage shuts down nerve and muscle cells, including those that keep the heart pumping.To test the idea, Yanagihara followed a standard procedure for studying jellyfish venom: She dissolved the tentacles in water to release the nematocysts and broke them with a mortar and pestle or glass beads to release the venom. Then she exposed immature frog egg cells—a common model in cell physiology—to the venom and measured ion movement using electrophysiological techniques. But the experiments kept failing. After scrutinizing every part of her experimental setup, she began to wonder whether her venom preparation was too impure to reveal its secrets. She realized that crushing the nematocysts produced a crude mix of venom and cellular debris—akin to putting “a rattlesnake in a blender” to get its venom, she says.Taking a cue from a 1970s study, she developed a new method that uses citrate, an acidic compound, to dislodge the nematocysts without breaking them. She then puts them in a French press, in which a piston forcibly ruptures all the nematocysts at once. A minuscule harvest of venom squeezes out through a tiny outlet that filters larger cellular components.The yield is excruciatingly low: some 10 milliliters of venom from 1000 box jellyfish. (Yanagihara collects a species named Alatina alata, often called the sea wasp, en masse in Hawaii.) But the result, she says, is a much purer venom. In it she found not only ion channel blockers, but also many porins, proteins that puncture cells, allowing their contents to leak out. She suspected hemolysis—the destruction of red blood cells by porins—might be the fatal mechanism. 1 AUSCAPE/UIG/GETTY IMAGES NOEL SAGUIL Killing mechanismJellyfish use venom to capture prey and to defend themselves from predators. Box jellyfish (Cubozoa), which swim in tropical and temperate seas worldwide, are the most dangerous; some can kill an adult human in minutes. Many injuries and deaths from box jellyfish go unreported.1 TriggerWhen potential prey or predators stimulate the cnidocil—a hairlike trigger—on a cnido- cyte, water within the cell rushes i nto the nematocyst and exerts immense pressure.3 Venom releasedVenom is immediately released from the tip of the tubule. Hours later, leftover venom may be released from the spines, too.The tentacles of some box jellyfish can extend up to 3 meters.center_img LAURA AGUON Her message was clear—and controversial. Yanagihara has staked out one corner in a debate over how the venom of box jellyfish kills, stopping the heart in as little as 5 minutes. What she calls her unified field theory holds that the venom contains proteins that puncture red blood cells and release potassium, disrupting the electrical rhythms that keep the heart beating. Her conclusions, and the treatments she has based on them, emerged from 20 years of science that colleagues praise as thorough and imaginative. Yanagihara “has done a great favor to the field in doing systematic comparisons” of methods to collect and study the venom, says Kenneth Winkel, a former director of The University of Melbourne’s Australian Venom Research Unit who is now at the university’s Melbourne School of Population and Global Health.But nobody has independently replicated Yanagihara’s methods and findings or tested her treatments. Some jellyfish researchers say other compounds in the venom are the real killers and that different remedies—or none at all—are more likely to work. “Jellyfish venom is a graveyard for simplistic causation and therapy,” Winkel says.Research that would resolve the debates is scarce. Worldwide, only about five research groups study jellyfish venom. Funders prefer to focus on bigger public health problems—although Yanagihara thinks the stings exact a much higher death toll than most people assume. So she and her few colleagues and competitors struggle on with small budgets to study the threat, develop remedies, and educate communities at risk. Jellyfish almost killed this scientist. Now, she wants to save others from their fatal venom 2 Angel Yanagihara preparing for a dive off the shore of Honolulu. She decided to study jellyfish venom after being stung during a morning swim in 1997. WaterWaterPotassium Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe TALAO-TALAO, THE PHILIPPINES—On 17 June, several families were celebrating Father’s Day here at Dalahican Beach, a popular bathing spot near Lucena, a city on Luzon island. A steady breeze blew across sand that looked like fine brown sugar. Children splashed in the dark green water. Suddenly, people started to scream as a toddler was lifted unconscious from the water, his lips pale. A witness recalled that dark lashes crawled across the toddler’s thighs—the telltale marks of a jellyfish sting. The boy’s family simply held him and cried. Shortly after, Prince Gabriel Mabborang, 18 months old, was dead—one of at least three children killed in the Philippines this summer by the stings of box jellyfish.On a midmorning 3 weeks later, Angel Yanagihara, who studies jellyfish venom at the University of Hawaii (UH) in Honolulu, arrived at Dalahican Beach. After slipping into a full-body wetsuit, she slung a box over her shoulder, put on gloves, and walked into the sea. No reminders of the recent tragedy were present; children were playing in the shallows, clapping their hands to Filipino songs. “Hello! What’s your name?” they giggled as Yanagihara, 58, walked by. Yanagihara spent almost 3 hours wading in waist-deep waters, hoping to catch box jellyfish for her studies of their venom. One of the nearly transparent animals swam to the surface, almost within reach, but then escaped as she approached. She emerged empty-handed, but villagers had brought her two specimens earlier that day.Among the world’s public health problems, jellyfish stings may seem trivial, affecting millions of people each year but known to kill only a few dozen. But many deaths may go unrecorded, and in some places, jellyfish stings take a real toll. Prince Gabriel was the second child killed on the same beach in the past year, and many people in the area bear the scars of nonfatal attacks. After news of the boy’s death spread rapidly on social media, Lucena health officials invited Yanagihara to talk about jellyfish venom and how to save sting victims, a service she provided for free. She spoke at a basketball court by the beach, and as she flipped to her slide on first aid, cellphones rose in a wave, snapping photos. Cnidocil LancetLancetVenom Angel Yanagihara gives a presentation about box jellyfish biology and stings at a rural health unit in Tagalag, a town on Samar island in the Philippines. Education and first aid can help reduce injuries and deaths, she says. Here in Talao-talao, the day before her talk, Yanagihara’s hotel room smelled of vinegar. Neat rows of empty spray bottles stood beside a big plastic box on the floor. Her Filipino collaborator poured 23 liters of vinegar into the box, followed by a base solution—made separately by mixing water with a blue powder—and voilà, the Sting No More spray was ready. They pumped the solution into the bottles with a long siphon, ready to be handed out.Her talk offered an unexpected chance for a real-world test. As she started to speak, a young man who had heard about her quest for box jellyfish walked in with a live one the size of a baseball cap. Wearing only boxers—he had just come from the beach—he held the relatively harmless cubic top in his hand, at arm’s length, the tentacles dangling to his knees. The audience froze in tension, while Yanagihara grabbed her spray. The man thrust the jellyfish into a bag and then jumped back when a tentacle grazed his hand. It hurt so badly that he wanted to scratch his hand off, he said. Yanagihara quickly applied her spray and cream. Three minutes later, the man said the pain had eased. He sat through the 90-minute talk.So far, Yanagihara has only such anecdotal evidence—along with hundreds of testimonials, she says—that her products work. Together with a clinician and two nurses in Hawaii, she has started a clinical trial in which 48 volunteers will be stung on both arms with centimeter-long pieces of tentacle from A. alata—small enough to cause only minor damage at the sting site. One arm will then be treated with vinegar and a hot pack, the other with either Yanagihara’s products or a combination of vinegar and a cold pack. (Yanagihara says she will take no part in the data collection and analysis.)Seymour questions whether Yanagihara’s antiporin cream can save lives, and he argues that her vinegar-based spray may even harm sting victims. In a 2014 paper in the journal Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine, he and his colleagues reported that vinegar causes nematocysts that have already fired to release more venom. He now recommends no treatment at all for sting victims suffering cardiac arrest, except cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which can help keep blood pumping to the brain until the heart starts to beat again. “I don’t care if they are screaming in pain 20 minutes later,” Seymour says, “as long as they are alive.”In a letter in the same journal, Yanagihara, along with a statistician, criticized Seymour’s vinegar study for flaws in the design and statistics; a group of Australian physicians published a critical letter as well. Yanagihara has also blasted “wildly extrapolative” reports of the study by Australian media, which claimed vinegar might kill. Cell bodyNematocyst (capsule)Operculum Settling the debate will require more research on venom pathology and treatment—plus funding, which might be easier to win if researchers could point to hard numbers on the toll of stings. Studies and media reports often cite an estimate of 150 million stings each year worldwide and 20 to 40 deaths in the Philippines annually. Those figures surfaced in a 2008 report from the U.S. National Science Foundation, but what they are based on is unclear. In a 1998 review, clinicians estimated that jellyfish kill up to 50 people in the Philippines every year, “based on personal experience,” without further explanation. More recent studies tallied at least two dozen fatal and severe jellyfish stings in Malaysia and Thailand combined since 2000, almost all in tourists from abroad.Most researchers believe the real number is much higher. The Philippines has a long, populated coastline dotted with estuaries where box jellyfish like to breed. In almost every coastal community Yanagihara has visited, locals lifted their shirts, sleeves, or pants to show scars from stings and recalled the deaths of friends and family from jellyfish. Many such cases don’t make it into official statistics. Seymour says he had the same experience in the Southeast Asian nation of Timor-Leste 20 years ago: Villagers “said they get stung all the time but didn’t bring the victims to the hospital,” he recalls. “They pointed to a tree and said they just buried them there.”Yanagihara and her collaborators are examining health surveillance records and surveying villagers and health workers in the Philippines. “We can triangulate these results to get a better idea of the burden,” says Catherine Pirkle, a UH public health epidemiologist on the project. Getting the study underway wasn’t easy. The National Institutes of Health twice rejected a grant application, Yanagihara says, and local institutes and health units initially were lukewarm as well. Part of the problem may be that many communities accept the danger as part of life. “Although our fishermen and children are often stung by box jellyfish, we don’t think it’s a serious problem,” says Reil Briones, Talaotalao’s village chief, who was stung by a jellyfish at age 11 and carries a scar on his arm.Yanagihara says the sentiment is now changing. On her latest trip, she spoke to full rooms of policymakers, health workers, and researchers, and many asked to collaborate with her team. Photos of Prince Gabriel circulating on social media may have played a role. “It’s a big issue if people are dying from jellyfish,” says Janet Gendrano, who leads the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office in Lucena. She says the tragedy was a wake-up call and wants to join the survey project; once the data are in, her office might propose an ordinance requiring beach resort operators to take first-aid training for stings and to put up warning signs.Yanagihara hopes the study will get jellyfish the attention they deserve. “If you are a pony on this racetrack of human suffering,” as many believe jellyfish stings to be, “you want to stand down,” she says. “But I have nothing but evidence to the contrary.”last_img read more

Chinese bioethicists call for reboot of biomedical regulation after countrys geneedited baby

first_imgHe Jiankui speaks at a 2018 conference in Hong Kong, China, where he gave a public account of creating the first gene-edited human babies. Four prominent Chinese bioethicists have published an unusually frank and critical assessment of their country’s handling of biomedical research in the wake of what they refer to as the “CRISPR babies’ scandal.”Their commentary, published online today in Nature, calls for “an overhaul” in the way the biomedical experiments in China are regulated, monitored, and registered and for “severe” penalties for researchers who violate regulations. “China is at a crossroads,” write Ruipeng Lei of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, Xiaomei Zhai of Peking Union Medical College in Beijing, Wei Zhu of Fudan University in Shanghai, and Renzong Qiu of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing. “The government must make substantial changes to protect others from the potential effects of reckless human experimentation.”The authors say a “soul searching” is now taking place in China because of the November 2018 revelation that He Jiankui, a biophysicist at the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, China, had created the world’s first babies, twin girls, who had genes edited while they were embryos. He, who was subsequently fired from his job and has not spoken publicly since he described the germline editing experiment at a Hong Kong, China, meeting, used CRISPR—which cuts DNA—to cripple a cell surface protein that HIV uses to infect cells. The intent, he said, was to “genetically vaccinate” the girls so that they would not be susceptible to the virus. Chinese bioethicists call for ‘reboot’ of biomedical regulation after country’s gene-edited baby scandal Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img In the Nature commentary, the authors criticize He for his secrecy and the country for creating an environment that encouraged him. “In our view, researchers in China are increasingly motivated by the promise of fame and fortune, rather than by a genuine desire for discovery,” they write. “And transferring devices or approaches to the clinic is not always backed by solid basic research. Moreover, researchers who can declare that they are the first to discover something, both in Asia and in the world, are disproportionately rewarded when it comes to peer review, hiring decisions and funding.”Bioethicists outside China are impressed by the editorial. “I think it’s rather remarkable that they published this in such a prominent place,” says Alta Charo, a bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison who is on an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization to assess how to better regulate germline editing. Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City, said he “admired” the article and thought it was “courageous” for his Chinese colleagues to speak so bluntly. “They’re getting into things that haven’t been said by others in China, so that’s very good.”The four authors contend that scientific research should be governed by the State Council, China’s cabinet, rather than the collection of government ministries that now do oversight, a system they say “is fragmented and hampered by staff incompetence or resistance.” They also urged their country to confront “the eugenic thinking that has persisted among a small proportion of Chinese scholars.”As for He, who was strongly criticized in preliminary findings made public by a Chinese government-controlled news outlet in January from an investigation run by the Guangdong Health Commission (the province where he worked), the bioethicists suggest the government conduct a more extensive inquiry. They recommend that “a committee of internationally renowned experts in gene editing assess the data resulting from He’s work” and also offer a blueprint for monitoring the health of the twin girls for their entire lives.Science corresponded by email with Qiu about the investigations surrounding He’s controversial experiment. This is an edited version of that exchange.Q: Xinhua, China’s official news agency, described the initial He inquiry as a “preliminary investigation,” which suggests it was either not complete or that there was at least another investigation underway. Do you know?A: Nothing suggests another investigation is underway. So, we suggest a further, more extensive inquiry is needed.Q: In the United States, western European countries, Australia, and Japan, a misconduct investigation of a scientist almost always leads to a thorough report that is made public. There has been nothing issued by the Guangdong Health Commission―nothing more than a press release given only to Xinhua—and your commentary did not call for any future report to be made public. Do you think these reports should be made public?A: Of course, I think such reports should be made public. There seem to be no rules on whether and how to report the findings of investigations on cases of violating regulations. My colleagues and I have suggested to build a central registry on genome editing which is open access to the public. The registry could also be a platform where findings of investigations on cases of violating regulations are published.Q: Have any of you been asked to help with any investigations of He?A: Immediately after the news was broke, the National Health Commission asked Xiaomei Zhai to go to Shenzhen to investigate the case―along with some commission officials. Zhai couldn’t go because she had to attend the Hong Kong summit. There were two occasions where I was invited by government think tanks to provide advice on He’s case. I suggested the government should make thorough investigation―especially any involvement of government officials and He’s colleagues and collaborators (both in China and the U.S.), including personnel at the IVF [in vitro fertilization] clinics―because He could not be the only person responsible for the incident. It’s unclear if any government officials were involved in the He incident in any way. But He certainly had ties with some governmental officials as his work on third-generation genome sequencing was prominently featured in a state television channel.Q: Your editorial calls for “rebooting” ethics governance. If any government officials or government-funded institutions supported or indicated approval of He’s germline editing in any way, are you confident that the Guangdong Health Commission’s investigation or any other investigation led by a government agency would transparently report this?A: Sorry, I am afraid I am not in a position to answer this question. There has been no transparency regarding who the members of the investigation team are, which procedures they have followed, or what they have found. In general, I favor that the government puts together investigation teams that consist of independent experts. I don’t know if more investigation results will be disclosed, but I think the world deserves to know the truth. And I don’t think we can properly move on or prevent similar incidents from happening again until we know exactly what has happened.I don’t believe the government per se is involved. I have some contact with deputy ministry of National Health Commission and some officials at its Department of Science and Education, and I think they are not only honest persons, but also hold the view like our bioethicists in compliance with international guidelines. In many cases, they accepted our suggestions on drafting or revising relevant regulations. However, I cannot exclude some governmental officials in some departments at different levels being involved in it.Q: Do you think independence of the investigatory team is important? Is it possible in China?A: For a bioethicist like me and many other scholars in China, that’s a given. Of course, the investigation should be both independent and transparent. I think it’s possible if China realizes the gravity of the matter. How China deals with it will determine the reputation and the future of the country and its scientific and bioethics communities. Email By Jon CohenMay. 8, 2019 , 2:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

New Movie Reimagines Malcolm X In Modern Times

first_img Malcolm X , MAlcolm X Birthday , malcolm x movie A Look Through His Eyes: The Malcolm Shabazz GIANT Photo Shoot Watch the new short film, “MALCOLM” below.SEE ALSO:#MalcolmXDay: 20 Quotes Relevant To The Movement TodayHappy Birthday, El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Malcolm X) “The social climate in America has been all to [sic] familiar when It comes to African American history,” wrote Todd Anthony, the star of the movie who uploaded the film to YouTube. “The voice of balance has been void to a degree but what if Malcolm X were here today to restore the imbalance? In this film “MALCOLM” directed by Will Catlett (Black Lightening, Love Is) starring Todd Anthony, Malcolm X comes back on 5/19/19 (his birthday) to discuss some of the current social issues that plague our country and to offer solutions for not only the African American culture but America as a whole!”Aside from Anthony, who also co-wrote the short film with Catlett, the production also stars Jay D. Henderson and Demarius Mack and also features music by the late rapper Nipsey Hussle.It would have been interesting to see what he’d have to say about President Donald Trump. Since we’ll never know, how about revisiting a couple of his best quotes:1. If you’re not ready to die for it, take the word ‘freedom’ out of your vocabulary.— Chicago Defender (November 28, 1962)2. We declare our right on this earth…to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary.As Malcolm X evolved away from his past as Detroit Red, he transformed himself first, into a loyal protégé of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, then, into a world-renowned human rights activist. He never hid behind his legend to avoid speaking of his time as a petty criminal, instead using his story to bolster the confidence of everyday men facing his same struggles. He let them know, in no uncertain terms, that they didn’t have to have a pristine past to make a difference in the present and the future. The Duality Of The Role Fear Plays In ‘The Talk’ More By NewsOne Staff ‘The Talk’ 101 In the history of African Americans who fought for the rights of our people, a conversation cannot go by without mentioning the great Malcolm X. May 19 is the birthday of the great civil rights leader who was killed by an assassin’s bullet. Had he survived, he would have turned 94 today.In honor of the iconic leader’s birthday, a new short film was produced reimagining Malcolm X being interviewed in 2019 and offering his sage commentary on how much things have changed (or stayed the same) in society. It’s an interesting take on how far the fight for civil rights has come, and how much farther society needs to go to truly attain social justice in American and around the world. How The News Cycle Dictates ‘The Talk’ Parents Have With Their Kidslast_img read more

NCI Director Norman Sharpless named acting FDA chief

first_imgNed Sharpless Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Daniel Sone/National Cancer Institute NCI Director Norman Sharpless named acting FDA chief Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Norman Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, will become acting administrator of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in Silver Spring, Maryland, after current FDA chief Scott Gottlieb steps down in early April.The announcement came this morning from Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar at a U.S. House of Representatives hearing. “Dr. Sharpless’ deep scientific background and expertise will make him a strong leader for FDA,” Azar said in a statement. “There will be no let-up in the agency’s focus, from ongoing efforts on drug approvals and combating the opioid crisis to modernizing food safety and addressing the rapid rise in youth use of e-cigarettes.”Gottlieb’s resignation to spend more time with his young family in Connecticut rattled markets and FDA watchers when it was announced last week. That uncertainty is at least temporarily eased by the acting appointment of Sharpless, a physician-scientist and former director of the University of North Carolina’s cancer center in Chapel Hill who has drawn praise as NCI director since October 2017.center_img By Jocelyn KaiserMar. 12, 2019 , 2:45 PM Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sharpless has bolstered support for NCI-funded clinical trials and freed up funds for research grants by trimming the internal NCI budget. He introduced a new policy to support promising young investigators by adding 2 years to their initial 5-year research grants. A champion of big data, Sharpless had just begun to shape a plan to spend $50 million in 2020 in part to share data on pediatric cancer patients as part of a 10-year childhood cancer initiative proposed by President Donald Trump. Although he does not have an industry background, he has started two biotech companies.The highly regarded Gottlieb reportedly recommended Sharpless as his replacement. He tweeted today: “I’m delighted by the announcement from @SecAzar that @NCIDirector will serve as acting commissioner of #FDA. Ned is a friend to FDA, a great public health champion, a dedicated physician, and will be warmly welcomed into his new role. FDA will benefit greatly from his leadership.”NCI Deputy Director Douglas Lowy, who served a stint as acting NCI director from April 2015 to October 2017, will again step in as acting NCI director.last_img read more

Scotlands bitter feud comes alive with discovery of 16th century clan seal

first_imgThe feuds between clans in 16th and 17th century Scotland are famous, and one that raged between the Campbell family and the MacDonald family was particularly unrelenting. Now a seal owned by one of the clan leaders, Sir John Campbell of Cawdor, has come to light. It was buried beneath mounds of rubble at Dunyvaig Castle on Islay, where the clans fought.Islay is the southernmost of the Inner Hebrides islands, off the west coast of Scotland, and is celebrated today for its whisky. In fact, Islay is known as “The Queen of the Hebrides” and celebrated as the reigning monarch of a typically smoky, peaty style of single malt whisky. Its 17th century history was considerably more tumultuous.Dunyvaig Castle, Islay, Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Seen from north within outer courtyard. Photo by Otter CC BY-SA 3.0The artifact that attests to the conflict was described as “remarkable” and “extremely rare” by archaeologists.Once used to sign and seal charters and documents, the seal is a disc of lead that carries the inscription “Ioannis Campbell de Calder.”  (Calder was the original spelling of Cawdor). It carries the Cawdor coat of arms with a galley ship and a stag and is dated 1593.The Campbells and the MacDonald’s fought over Dunyvaig in the early 17th century, with a series of sieges of the castle until the Campbells won. Sir John took ownership of Islay in 1615.A field school student has unearthed the seal of Sir John Campbell of Cawdor, a leader of the Campbell clan. Photo by Islay Heritage and the University of ReadingLosing the castle was a bitter blow for the MacDonalds. The castle was once the naval fortress of the Lords of the Isles, the chiefs of the clan MacDonald. Most of the castle remains are from the 16th century but the foundations are believed to be centuries older.The seal was found by a field student during an excavation of the castle being carried out by Islay Heritage and the University of Reading. According to the BBC, University of Reading student Zoë Wiacek, who found the seal, said everyone on the dig became excited when it was uncovered.She said: “I removed a piece of rubble and it was just sitting there on the ground. I immediately knew it was an important find, but had no idea what it was. I called over my trench supervisor, and when it was lifted, the soil fell away to show the inscription.”Colin Campbell of GlenorchyThe clan feud was a bitter one and long lasting, with much blood spilled.The website Memories of Scotland says, “Memories run long in the highlands of Scotland and, we’ve heard tell, the bitterness between Clans Campbell and MacDonald continues to this day. The clash between these two ancient Celtic houses, which has lasted for hundreds of years, is not just about lands, religion, Jacobitism, or even betrayal. Rather, it is about power.”In 1344, the chief of the MacDonalds began to style himself “Lord of the Isles.” Each of the succeeding Lords of the Isles rebelled against their Stewart king, often in coordination with the English kings.Dunyvaig Castle, Islay, Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Seen from northeast. Photo by Otter CC BY-SA 3.0Said Memories of Scotland, “They sought an independent Highland kingdom and bitterly resented paying fealty to lowland Scots. They had been kings and wished to be kings still. Yet, they were completely unsuccessful and there were only four acknowledged Lords of the Isles.”The Campbells, however, sought power in Scotland while cooperating with the Stewart kings, and they were the ones who tried to take down the MacDonalds.“The Campbell lands lie in Argyll. By the 16th century, the chiefs were Earls of Argyll, and these days (and for some time past) there has been a Duke of Argyll, the 9th of whom married a daughter of Queen Victoria.”Ruins of Dunyvaig Castle. Photo by Chris Heaton CC BY-SA 2.0As the clan with the muscle in that part of Scotland, the Campbells were all too ready to besiege the castle on Islay and try to dislodge the MacDonalds. After they won, there was of course considerable bitterness.The most notorious chapter in the clans’ feud was the Massacre of Glencoe in 1692. The Campbells, now loyal to the British Crown, held by William of Orange, instead of the Stuarts and their Jacobite cause, initiated an underhand and savage attack against the MacDonalds. Their soldiers killed the chief of the clan, 33 other men, two women, and two children.The massacre took place after the Campbells and their followers were welcomed by the MacDonalds for two weeks of Celtic hospitality. The Campbells had pretended to come as friends. But in the dark early morning of February 13, 1692, the guests slaughtered their unarmed hosts, not even sparing the children.Read another story from us: Game of Thrones’ Red Wedding is based on Scotland’s Black Dinner in 1440 and Glencoe Massacre of 1692The horror of the Glencoe Massacre is thought to have inspired George R. R. Martin in his “Red Wedding” section of Game of Thrones, in which one family is wiped out under the guise of hospitality.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more

Mourning Fashion and Etiquette in the Victorian Era

first_imgWhen Prince Albert succumbed to illness on a bleak December day in 1861, this marked the beginning of Queen Victoria’s period of mourning, which ended with her death some four decades later, in 1901. The Queen never got over the loss of spouse of 21 years. Her prince’s death was premature, at the age of 42, so she stuck to dark outfits for the remainder of her years.At the same time, this tragedy within the royal household was sort of booster to mourning dresses and etiquette — a lucrative business on its own right.Queen Victoria in 1890.Crêpe, which was the most used fabric for sewing mourning attire, was used in such quantities that by the end of the 19th century, British fabric manufacturers Courtaulds had amassed a fortune by selling this type of textile alone.As mourners needed to be supplied with proper clothing quickly, there were also numerous vendors who catered for their needs. In London, one of the most popular was Jay’s Mourning Warehouse, which opened in 1841.Girl in a mourning dress holding a framed photograph of her father, who presumably died during the American Civil War.Mourning etiquette was not so rigid in the early years of the Victorian era, but after Queen Victoria’s own Annus horribilis in 1861, things changed. Principles were indeed reinforced. What came out of the royal household was copied at every other layer of society, including the working classes.The general rule was that a full mourning period over a loved one lasted a year, though the period was sometimes extended to two years, or as was the case with the Queen — it felt like it hardly ever ended.Elderly woman, possibly dressed in mourning clothes, 1890-1900.The full mourning period was coupled with a half-mourning period which lasted for an additional two years. Victoria herself sported half-mourning dresses, overwhelmingly dark except little bits of white or purple, decades after Prince Albert’s demise.It was toughest for widowed women, who were expected never to abandon their dark garments while grieving, as well as avoiding any social gatherings or events that had a hint of joy (as if this would aid the loss).Victorian-style mourning dress with bustle.The widow’s outfit was known as the widow’s weeds. While it was all sewn in crêpe, the collars and the cuffs of shirts were edged with black piping too. Buttons were black and jewelry was also supposed to be dark, such as black pearls or jet-stones for those who could afford them. Those who couldn’t used cheaper imitations.Another popular option was using a lock of hair belonging to the dearly departed. The relic was often woven in a beautiful knot and worn as a brooch, with it the memory of the lost one.Mourning jewelry. Photo by Detlef Thomas CC BY-SA 2.0 deIf a grieving person owned, for example, a pair of white gloves, these needed some adjustment. Embroidering with black thread would have done the trick.A rare exception would have been the funeral of a young deceased girl, where white was among the acceptable colors in the outfit combinations, as it symbolized purity. However, this practice somehow disappeared.To adjust to all such requirements of the abundant mourning etiquette required money and a manual. For the wealthier, a mourning period was more or less another chance to communicate their economic standing in society.Queen Victoria with the five surviving children of her daughter, Princess Alice, dressed in mourning clothing for their mother and their sister Princess Marie in early 1879.In case of multiple deaths in a household over a short period of time, it meant mourning phases extended for several years. All regular clothing during this period were stored away. By the time the mourning ritual was through, it was no surprise if those stored-away clothes had gone entirely out of fashion.On the benefits of mourning warehouses, it was bad luck to keep attire at home after the mourning was through. The used black clothes were discarded. If someone else died afterward, the required outfit was bought anew — if you had the money to so often change your wardrobe.Those who were unable to afford to purchase any black garments dyed and used what they already had.The five daughters of Prince Albert wore black dresses and posed for a portrait with his statue following his death in 1861.Those not so familiar with the correct etiquette were able to check in any of the popular household manuals that were published at the time. Women, who stood out as leaders of the household’s mourning procedures, normally kept a copy of these manuals at home. Cassell’s and The Queen were among the most popular ones (so you could learn to mourn like a queen).Such help books thoroughly instructed the reader on the most appropriate ways to mourn, among other tips on general dressing. There were tons of little rules that reflected on the sorrow and the sentiment of loss. And everyone was expected to abide by these when someone near and dear to them died.Woman’s mourning dress (1867-1869): silk bodice and skirt with black fringe, white lace cuffs, and white guaze collar. Museum of Funeral Customs, Springfield, Illinois, 2006. Photo by Robert Lawton CC BY-SA 2.0The amount of black to be worn was dictated by the various stages of mourning, such as the full mourning year and the half-mourning stage that followed.In specific cases, women were able to remarry past their sixth month of mourning, when there was a need: If the husband was abroad for years and missing, or perhaps suffered and passed due to a long, exhausting disease, and the woman had children to feed.Woman in blackOther than this, it was acceptable for a woman to adopt a little grey or little purple on her outfit once she entered the half-mourning period. At this point, she was also able to go back to social gatherings.The Workwoman’s Guide, published in 1840, details expected mourning time for loss of other relatives. A parent was to grieve up to half a year or a full year, and the same principle stuck for children older than ten. Below the age of ten, children were mourned up to six months. An infant was mourned six weeks at the least.Illustration of woman in mourning.Siblings were mourned in between six and eight months, and uncles and aunties from three and six months. Friends were mourned three weeks at the least.And men? It was a bit easier for them, at least with the outfit. A normal-looking dark suit combined with black gloves and dark-colored cravat would have been appropriate enough. A black ribbon was sometimes worn as an armband, too.Children themselves attending a funeral were not expected to wear any mourning clothes, though they were sometimes dressed in white clothes.Read another story from us: Dark Secrets and Scandals that have Rocked the VaticanThese rigid principles of deep mourning were somewhat abandoned once the Edwardian era commenced. Even more impactful was World War I. When the war was over in 1918, it seemed the entire world was mourning, and such rigidity didn’t really soothe anyone anymore.last_img read more

Karnataka Five more rebel MLAs move SC say being threatened to support

first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence karnataka crisis, karnataka coalition crisis, karnataka congress, congress jd(s) in karnataka, congress jd(s) government, karnataka rebel mlas, karnataka congress mlas, karnataka assembly speaker, supreme court, india news, Indian Express The 10 rebels had moved the Supreme Court against the Speaker’s decision to reject their resignations. (File/PTI)The political crisis in Karnataka continued to fester as five more rebel MLAs approached the Supreme Court on Saturday, accusing Assembly Speaker K R Ramesh of sitting on their resignations. The legislators also said they were “being threatened to support the government on the threat of disqualification”. By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 14, 2019 1:24:17 am Opposing this stand of the Speaker, the five legislators said the Constitution “contemplates only an inquiry to be conducted and not an enquiry and therefore there is no necessity of any elaborate hearing. The inquiry is directed only for two considerations i.e., a) whether the resignation is voluntary and b) whether it is genuine. lt is submitted that once the MLA himself states that the resignation is voluntary, there is no scope for any inquiry on this account. Even for the second ground, namely it must be ‘Genuine’ when the person concerned submits it in person under his own signature, the said ground is also answered. Both these conditions being fulfilled, elaborate enquiry is not contemplated in the present scenario”.They said there were no disqualification proceedings against them on the date of their resignation and hence there was no ground to deny them the right of the resignation on the ground of pendency of disqualification proceedings. The resignation cannot be invalidated by filing disqualification proceedings subsequently, they added.They claimed that the subsequent disqualification petition against them was filed by the Congress party stating that they had not attended the legislature party meeting held outside the House. “It is submitted that the non-attendance of the legislature party meeting outside the house does not amount to a ground for disqualification”.The MLAs claimed that the disqualification proceedings were being “used to threaten and intimidate” them. Those who moved the court Saturday are Anand Singh, K Sudhakar, N Nagaraju, Roshan Baig and Munirathna.Their application, filed through advocate Shubhranshu Padhi, sought to implead in the main plea filed by 10 other MLAs. It said the resignation letters of four — Singh, Sudhakar, Nagaraju and Baig — of the five MLAs were submitted to the Speaker in person.Acting on the plea by the 10 MLAs, the Supreme Court had on July 11 asked the Speaker to decide on the resignations before the end of the day. The Speaker, however, said this was not possible, as under the Constitution, he was required to conduct an “enquiry” to ascertain whether the resignation was voluntary and genuine and that he would need more time for this. SC rules: Rebel Karnataka MLAs can’t be compelled to participate in trust vote center_img Express daily briefing: Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict out today; SC to rule on Karnataka MLAs’ plea; and more Best Of Express Advertising Related News Karnataka crisis: SC verdict a moral victory for rebel MLAs, says Yeddyurappa “It is stated that on the one hand the Hon’ble Speaker is not acting upon the resignations and on the other hand a whip has been issued by the Governing party threatening disqualification for failure to attend the legislature proceedings starting from 12.7.19…It is submitted that despite the Applicants having resigned, the Applicants are being threatened to support the Govt. on the threat of disqualification”, their plea submitted.On July 12, the SC ordered a status quo in the matter, asking the Speaker not to decide on the disqualifications or resignations till it heard the matter again on July 16. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Brain wave device boosts memory performance

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2018The entrainment of theta brain waves with a commercially available device not only enhances theta wave activity, but also boosts memory performance. That’s according to new research from the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis, published recently in the journal Cognitive Neuroscience.Electrical activity in the brain causes different types of brain waves that can be measured on the outside of the head. Theta waves occur at about five to six cycles per second, often associated with a brain that is actively monitoring something — such as the brain of a rat navigating a maze.In an earlier study, Charan Ranganath, professor of psychology, and colleagues at the Center for Neuroscience found that high levels of theta wave activity immediately before a memory task predicted better performance.”Entrainment” devices use a combination of sound and lights to stimulate brain wave activity. The idea is that oscillating patterns in sensory inputs will be reflected in brain activity. The devices are marketed to address a range of problems such as anxiety, sleep issues, “low mood” and learning. However, there is very little published scientific evidence to support these claims.Related StoriesRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsBrooke Roberts, a postdoctoral researcher in Ranganath’s lab, obtained a theta wave entrainment device and decided to test it. She had 50 volunteers either use the device for 36 minutes, or listen to 36 minutes of white noise, then do a simple memory test.Improved memory performanceThe subjects who had used the device showed both improved memory performance and enhanced theta wave activity, she found.Roberts showed her results to Ranganath, who was intrigued but cautious and suggested new controls. They repeated the experiment with another 40 volunteers, but this time the control group received beta wave stimulations. Beta waves are a different type of brain wave pattern, occurring at about 12 to 30 cycles per second, associated with normal waking consciousness.Once again, theta wave entrainment enhanced theta wave activity and memory performance.Ranganath’s lab also conducted a separate study using electrical stimulation to enhance theta waves. However, this actually had the opposite effect, disrupting theta wave activity, and temporarily weakened memory function.Ranganath said he’s surprised the devices work as well as they appear to do.”What’s surprising is that the device had a lasting effect on theta activity and memory performance for over half an hour after it was switched off,” he said.There is debate among neuroscientists over the function and role of these brain waves. Some researchers argue that they are simply a product of normal brain function with no particular role. Ranganath, however, thinks that they may play a role in coordinating brain regions.”The neurons are more excitable at the peak of the wave, so when the waves of two brain regions are in sync with each other, they can talk to each other,” he said.Source: https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/brain-wave-device-enhances-memory-functionlast_img read more

Study finds increase in opioidaffected births to rural residents in rural and

first_img Diagnosis of maternal OUD and NAS are steadily increasing among rural residents, and opioid-affected births are occurring in all hospital settings: rural and urban, teaching and non-teaching. The highest rates of maternal opioid use disorder diagnoses occurred among rural patients giving birth in urban teaching hospitals. Rural women with opioid use disorder and other clinical complications were more likely to give birth in urban teaching hospitals, compared with rural hospitals, likely indicating appropriate referral patterns for higher risk patients. Nearly half (48.3 percent) of rural moms with both opioid use disorder and a preterm delivery gave birth in rural hospitals, highlighting the importance of readiness to care for complex patient needs in all hospital settings. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 30 2018The opioid epidemic has had devastating effects on families in rural communities, places where both maternity care and substance use treatment are limited.Pregnant women with opioid addiction may have particular challenges in receiving the care they need when they live in rural areas. Both maternal opioid use disorder (OUD) and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), also known as infant withdrawal, are increasing faster in rural areas than in urban areas. Rural women with opioid-affected births may give birth locally in rural hospitals or may be referred to higher acuity facilities in urban areas, which may be better equipped to handle complex treatment needs.Katy Kozhimannil, associate professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and director of the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center, and her colleagues studied where rural moms with opioid use disorder gave birth and examined the characteristics of opioid-affected births to rural moms, based on whether they occurred in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals or urban teaching hospitals. Her research was recently published in the Journal of Rural Health.The study examined maternal and infant records for childbirths to rural residents that occurred from 2007-2014. The analysis included 942,798 rural mothers and 981,090 rural infants.”Some of these rural moms, especially those with clinical complications, give birth in urban, teaching hospitals, often far from home,” said Kozhimannil. “Yet, our study findings show that more than 60 percent of rural moms with opioid use disorder give birth locally. These rural hospitals may have more limited capacity to care for them and their babies.”Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needAdditional key findings include: “Recent policy and clinical efforts to address opioid-affected births have frequently focused on specialized capacity building within tertiary care settings, often urban teaching hospitals,” said Kozhimannil. “Yet, these results show that resources are also needed in rural hospitals that are caring for more and more opioid-affected moms and babies each year.”The characteristics of rural mothers with opioid-affected births are different for those who give birth in rural hospitals and those who give birth in urban hospitals. This finding highlights the distinct clinical and programmatic needs required in each hospital setting to successfully care for rural mothers with opioid use disorder and for rural infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome, no matter where they are born.center_img Source:https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/research-brief-opioid-affected-births-rural-residents-are-increasing-both-rural-andlast_img read more

Antiaging protein hormone Klotho shown to be neuroprotective in ALS model

first_imgRelated StoriesHinge-like protein may unlock new pathways for cystic fibrosis treatmentVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds studyQuorn protein stimulates muscle building to a greater extent than milk proteinUnfortunately, very few treatments are available to ALS patients today. “We propose that increasing the levels of the Klotho protein would significantly alleviate the neurologic manifestations, improve the quality of life and prolong life span in patients with ALS. If one was to extrapolate the results of this study, increasing Klotho by only 50 percent would prolong life by approximately 300 days.”According to Abraham, anything that increases Klotho levels is neuroprotective. For example, it has been shown that exercise increases Klotho. “This may be relevant for healthy individuals or patients newly diagnosed with ALS. Additionally, in the cases of familial ALS, family members who wish to be tested and discover that they are carriers of an ALS gene could start exercising or start Klotho boosting therapy, once it becomes available.” Source:Boston University School of MedicineJournal reference:Abraham, C. et al. (2019) Klotho Is Neuroprotective in the Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1G93A) Mouse Model of ALS. Journal of Molecular Neuroscience. doi.org/10.1007/s12031-019-01356-2. Here we now show that Klotho is also neuroprotective in an ALS model. Thus, increasing Klotho levels would be a logical treatment for age-related neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases.”Corresponding author Carmela Abraham, PhD, professor of biochemistry at BUSM Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 28 2019Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model.ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons, leading to progressive muscle atrophy and paralysis, which is fatal within three to five years of diagnosis.Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have previously shown that increasing Klotho protein levels is beneficial in experimental models of Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis.last_img read more

Study uncovers new way to identify driver genes important for cancer progression

first_imgIn our study, we identified that certain recurrent mutations found in DNA stem loops, a common DNA structure, were in fact passenger hotspots and not the drivers we had originally believed them to be. More importantly, we discovered other recurrent mutations, found in DNA locations outside of stem loops, may be new drivers that are not yet characterized. The importance of our finding is that it gives us the ability to discriminate among mutations, which is essential in order to develop novel cancer therapies.”Rémi Buisson, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Chemistry at the UCI School of Medicine and lead researcher on the study Related StoriesStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerResearch teams from UCI School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital examined the mutation landscape and the distribution of mutations in the cancer genomes of more than 9,000 patient tumors. They identified that certain hotspot mutations arise from the activity of a family of proteins called APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like).”Our analyses show that APOBEC3A, in particular, has a strong preference for DNA structures called stem-loops or DNA hairpins. This preference results in the creation of hotspot mutations in patient tumors,” said Buisson.Tens of thousands of DNA damage events occur daily in human cells. The APOBEC family of proteins are one of the most common sources of endogenous DNA damage events in cancer cells. APOBEC3A directly attacks genomic DNA, inducing DNA double-strand breaks and mutations. Until now, little was known about how APOBEC3A targets genomic DNA and if some structures of the genome are more prone to APOBEC3A attacks than others. DNA stem-loop structures can be transiently generated during DNA replication, transcription or through diverse DNA repair processes. These multiple pathways provide many opportunities for APOBEC3A to promote structure-specific cytosine deamination favoring the emergence of passenger hotspot mutations in patient tumors. Source:University of California, Irvine Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 29 2019Until now, researchers believed recurrent mutations (hotspot mutations) in cancer tumors were the important mutations (driver mutations) that promoted cancer progression. A new University of California, Irvine-led study indicates this is not always true.Methods for identifying driver genes important to cancer progression have relied on the gold standard of recurrence across patients. Seeing exactly the same DNA base pair mutated repeatedly across many patients has been taken as incontrovertible proof that the mutation must be contributing to tumor development. However, the study, “Passenger hotspot mutations in cancer driven by APOBEC3A and mesoscale genomic features,” published today in Science, reveals many recurrent cancer mutations are likely passenger hotspot mutations and not important for cancer development.last_img read more